Lunch Menu: Week of July 17th, 2018

Starters & Salads

Farm Salad (8.00) (GF, vegan)
GTF salad mix, summer vegetables, toasted hazelnuts, with thyme & balsamic vinaigrette

Simply Salad (6.00) (GF, vegan)
GTF salad mix, thyme balsamic vinaigrette

Summer Vegetable Confit (7.00) (Vegan)
Tomatoes, summer squash, pearl onions, garlic, olive oil, fresh bread

Cucumber & Flower Salad (9.00) (V, GF)
Walnuts, chilies, scallions, basil, mint, nasturtium, borage, meyer lemon, yogurt

Heirloom Tomato & Basil Salad (9.00) (V, GF)
Heirloom tomatoes, farm ricotta, balsamic, basil

Fish Cakes & Greens (16.00)
Pacific rockfish, potato, herbs, GTF salad mix, carrot, radish, charred chive  aioli, sherry vinaigrette

Summer Vegetable Flatbread (8.00) (V)
Roasted eggplant puree, tomatoes, shaved fennel, yogurt, herbs

Tomato Gazpacho (6.00) (vegan)
Basil, olive oil, grilled bread


Wood-Fired Pizza

Margherita (11.00) (V)
Marinara, mozzarella, basil

Shiitake Mushroom, White Kale, & Anchovy (13.00)
Olive oil, parmesan, chili flake

Heirloom Tomato, Chorizo & Kalamata Olive (13.00)
Marinara, mozzarella, fresh herbs, arugula

Tomatillo, Summer Squash & Scallion (13.00) (V)
Basil pesto, parmesan


Larger Plates & Sandwiches

Reuben Sandwich (13.00) (half 7.50)
Pastrami, Isaac’s sauerkraut, swiss cheese, thousand island, rye bread, side salad

Smoked Chorizo Sandwich (13.00) (half 7.50) (DF)
Farm smoked spanish chorizo, peperonata, garlic aioli, cilantro, ciabatta bread, side salad

Summer Vegetable Sandwich (12.00)(half 7.00) (Vegan)
Marinated zucchini, butter lettuce, tomato, pea sprouts, salsa verde, pugliese bread, side salad

Chicken Ratatouille (17.00) (GF)
Oven roasted GTF chicken, red onion, zucchini, eggplant, tomato, green pepper, pecorino romano, basil

Summer Vegetable Plate (16.00) (GF, vegan)
Summer squash, sweet onions, carrots, tomatoes, fennel, salsa verde, pumpkin seeds

Braised Beef Ossobuco   (19.00) (GF)
Potato puree, roasted summer vegetables, beef jus

Braised Fennel, Tomato, & Eggplant Pasta (18.00) (V)
Pappardelle, olives, pecorino romano, basil

Seared Chinook Salmon (21.00)
Camas Country Mill wheat berry salad, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, labneh


Jules’ Sweet Treats

Boysenberry Apple Crisp (8.00) (GF)
Walnut, hazelnut, and coconut crumble, boysenberries, fuji apples, candied ginger ice cream

Lemon Baby Cheesecake (8.00) (GF)
Boysenberry syrup, meyer lemon gel, fresh berries, candied orange peel, sweet pastry crust.  Perfect for sharing.

Chocolate Caramel Zucchini Cake (7.00)
Whiskey ganache, salted caramel, chantilly, toasted almonds

Peachy Ginger Ice Cream Cone (6.00)
House-made candied ginger ice cream, waffle cone, fresh peach and ginger compote

Scoop of farm ice cream  ($3)
Ask server for today’s flavors

 

From the farm: boysenberries, rhubarb, garlic scapes. Snap pea, zucchini, young potato, radishes, romaine, broccolini, basil, spring garlic, salad mix, chard, cilantro, radish sprouts, carrots, yellow onion, leeks,  endive, arugula, beets, cucumber, chives, tarragon, thyme, parsley, oregano, all other vegetables! (except celery and clove garlic)

CSA 2018 – Week 6: The Art of Noticing

CSA Newsletter – Week 6


The Art of Noticing

Though not many of us work on a farm these days, there are still things that we notice about the changing seasons. This past week we all experienced this summer’s first major heat wave. Many of us respond by packing away sweaters and thick pants and turning our attention to clothing that is light and/or able to survive a jump into the river. Some of us may feel a craving to eat lighter, cooler foods as opposed to the heavier, hotter foods that we glom onto in the winter months. Though we may be far removed from our subsistence-farming lives, we cannot escape the need to  respond and adapt to our changing environment.

On the farm the heat wave produced a thousand new things to notice. The crops seem to be doubling in size every few days, but that means that the weeds are doing the same thing. Suddenly the hoop houses that have been giving our hot-weather crops the head start they need are holding more heat than the plants can withstand. Within just one week, the amount to harvest has pretty much doubled, the weed pressure seems to have tripled, and the need to shade all of our hoop houses with hand-thrown mud one Nancy’s yogurt cup at a time has become immediate.

The more energy the sun gives us in a day, the more the plants capture, and the more work there is for us all to do. It is known that we will not get to everything on the to-do list every day, and so a highly educated triage of tasks must be done to decide what must be done when. The weeds in the salad field may be five times taller than the lettuce, but that field will get tilled in next week so it’s a better use of our time to weed the winter squash that has tiny weeds but will be in the field until October.

Those who have been farming for their entire lives have spent their lives honing in the art of noticing required to adapt and respond to the changing seasons. Farming is so beautifully complicated, so realistically chaotic just like the weather that it depends on. All we can do is continue to hone in our own art of noticing so that we know how best to ride the ups and downs of the seasons year after year.

Best, Laura Bennett


Table of Box Contents

  • Gold Beets—If you already love beets, then you’ll definitely love these gold beets. For those who struggle to enjoy beets however, gold beets can be an excellent first step into appreciating a milder version of beet flavor that is particularly sweet. Out in the field, we’ve come to call these “mangos,” because when you peel them the inner color looks just like the tropical fruit.
  • Summer Cabbage
  • Fresh Shallots— Shallots are a cross between garlic and onions, which you can see from the way they often bulb up in twos or threes. Their flavor is a perfect balance, much stronger than onion, yet not tricky to peel like garlic. I use them as an onion substitute in everything!
  • Tomatoes
  • Zucchiniexcellent grilled whole! A few of you got Cocazelle zucchini, which are striped and have thicker skins, great for holding up on the grill.
  • Sweet Slice Cucumbers— These cucumbers may have thicker and more rumply skins, however their flavor is by far the sweetest out of the other cucumbers that we grow. Thinly slice into salads to avoid the skin’s texture, or peel if desired. If you have a mandolin or a spiralizer, thinly slice long strips of cukes and season with toasted sesame oil, vinegar, and salt for a delicious fresh salad
  • Nicola Potatoes—their waxy and buttery flavor makes these perfect for roasting as they hold their shape well.
  • Lettuce Surprise—this week’s box contains a mix of different lettuce types.
  • Semi-Sweet Onions
  • Blueberries!

Recipes

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Beet Slaw with Pistachios and Raisins

“The pistachio butter underneath the slaw is like an Asian peanut sauce, bringing a much fuller nut flavor than the pistachios could offer alone. As you eat the dish, the juices from the slaw dissolve the pistachio butter and make a crazy good sort of vinaigrette. 

Servings 4 people
Author Adapted from Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 2 Tbsp white wine vinegar (or any acid)
  • 1 1/4 lb beets; use a mix of colors if you can
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup flat leaf parsley leaves, lightly packed
  • 1/4 cup mint leaves, lightly packed
  • 1/2 tsp dried chili flakes
  • salt & pepper
  • olive oil
  • pistachio butter (or any nut butter)
  • Suggested Additions: cabbage & fennel, sliced thinly

Instructions

  1. Combine the garlic, raisins, and vinegar in a large bowl and let sit for 1 hour.

  2. Grate the beets on the large holes of a box grater or cut into fine julienne. Yes, your hands will get stained, but the color fades quickly.

  3. Remove the garlic from the raisins and discard. And the beets, lemon juice, most of the parsley and mint (save the rest for finishing), and chili flakes. Season with 1.5 tsp salt and lots of black pepper and toss. Let it sit for about 5 minutes and then taste—the slaw should be tart, spicy, peppery, and sweet. Adjust the seasoning, if necessary, then add ¼ cup olive oil. Toss and taste again.

  4. To serve, plate and top with the slaw. Finish with reserved fresh herbs and a drizzle of olive oil.

 

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Cucumber-Fennel Fizz

“Imagine it’s 100°F with 90 percent humidity; the air is still and sodden. You are hot and sticky, and even breathing requires effort. What you need is a nice, cold drink. Cucumber Fennel Fizz is the perfect blend of tangy and refreshing. The cucumber is the standout flavor with a hint of fennel in the background. The lime juice and vinegar add a nicely sour edge. The fizz makes everything livelier. You feel invigorated; you can once again face the world.”

Servings 2 drinks
Author Adapted from Food52

Ingredients

  • 1 large cucumber
  • 1/4 oz fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz apple cider vinegar
  • 4 ice cubes
  • 1 inch fresh fennel bulb
  • 1 can club soda or ginger ale
  • 2 short stalks fresh fennel for garnish
  • 10 (frozen) blueberries
  • 3 oz gin (optional)

Instructions

  1. Skin cucumber, cut into 4 chunks, and toss into blender.

  2. Add lime juice, apple cider vinegar, ice, and 1-inch fresh fennel bulb. Add gin if using. Blend until smooth and foamy, about 1 minute. Don’t be tempted to add more liquid unless your cucumber is exceptionally dry and it refuses to blend. (In which case add a dash of soda.)

  3. Split the cucumber mix between two glasses, adding either club soda or ginger ale in a 1:1 ratio. Add 5 frozen or fresh blueberries to each glass. Garnish with a sprig of fresh fennel.

Print

Zucchini Pancakes

— adapted from Food52 

Ingredients

  • 2 cups grated zucchini
  • 1/2 cup grated potato
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tbsp chopped parsley
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1 pinch breadcrumbs
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp sour cream or yogurt

Instructions

  1. Grate your zucchini and potato using the largest hole on your grater. Let stand in a colander for at least 30 minutes to drain. They will hold together better when you drain out maximum moisture. Salt generously

  2. In a bowl, beat egg, chopped parsley, and lemon zest. Add pinch of salt and pepper to taste.

  3. Roll and squeeze zucchini/potato mixture in a towel to soak up moisture. Add pinch of breadcrumbs to soak up any leftover wetness.

  4. Combine zucchini/potato mixture with egg mixture. Stir well and coat.

  5. Turn on oven to 200°F and place cookie sheet with foil in there to keep your pancakes warm as you make them. 

  6. Heat 13” skillet on medium high heat. Melt 1 Tbsp of butter. You can use olive oil if you prefer, but butter is delicious. When foam subsides, drop a spoonful of your pancake mixture in. You don’t really need to form it in advance, but pat it with a spatula and try to flatten it out as much as possible—it’ll be more crispy that way.

  7. Cook 2 at a time until golden brown on each side, then place in oven to keep warm to make additional pancakes. Serve as soon as possible, with a dollop of sour cream or (drained Greek) yogurt on top for extra richness.

 

Dinner Menu: July 12-14, 2018

Starters & Salads

Farm Salad (9.00) (vegan, GF)
Salad greens, summer vegetables, toasted hazelnuts, thyme balsamic vinaigrette

Simply Salad (7.00) (vegan, GF)
Salad greens, thyme & balsamic vinaigrette

Summer Vegetable Confit (7.00) (Vegan)
Fresh bread, tomatoes, summer squash, pearl onions, garlic, basil, olive oil

Eggplant Parmigiana (9.00) (GF, V)
Mixed green salad

Curried Summer Vegetable Gratin (10.00) (V)
Chickpeas, summer squash, tomato, spinach, paneer cheese, bread crumbs

Cucumber & Flower Salad (9.00) (GF, V)
Walnuts, chilies, scallions, basil, mint, lemon, yogurt

Heirloom Tomato & Basil Salad (9.00) (V, GF)
Heirloom tomatoes, farm ricotta, balsamic, basil

Summer Vegetable Flatbread (8.00) (V)
Roasted eggplant puree, tomatoes, shaved fennel, herbs

Siletz Tomato Gazpacho (6.00) (vegan)
Basil, olive oil, grilled bread


Wood-Fired Pizzas

Margherita (11.00) (V)
Marinara, mozzarella, basil

Shiitake Mushroom, White Kale, & Anchovy (13.00)
Olive oil, chevre, chili flake, purslane

Heirloom Tomato, Chorizo & Kalamata Olive (13.00)
Marinara, mozzarella, fresh herbs, nasturtium

Tomatillo, Summer Squash & Scallion (13.00) (V)
Basil pesto, parmesan


Entrees

Summer Vegetable Plate (16.00) (GF, V)
Summer squash, sweet onions, carrots,  eggplant, tomatoes, tomatillos, mole verde, pumpkin seeds

Braised Fennel, Tomato, & Eggplant Pasta (18.00) (V)
Pappardelle, olives, pecorino romano, basil

Seared Chinook Salmon (24.00)
Camas Country Mill wheat berry salad, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, labneh

Peach Glazed Pork Chop (22.00) (DF)
Deck Family Farms bone-in pork chop, peach & gewurztraminer compote, roasted baby onions, caramelized fennel, pearled barley salad

Chicken Ratatouille (19.00) (GF)
Oven roasted GTF chicken, red onion, zucchini, eggplant, tomato, green pepper, pecorino romano

Braised Lamb Shank (23.00) (GF,DF)
Cattail Creek lamb shank, grilled eggplant, roasted fennel & tomatoes, couscous, cilantro & mint chutney


Jules’ Sweet Treats

Apple + Boysenberry Crisp (8.00) (GF)
Hazelnut and coconut crumble, caramel apple compote,  boysenberries, cardamom ice cream. Served warm.

Caramel Chocolate Zucchini Cake (8.00)
Whiskey ganache, salted caramel, chantilly, toasted almonds

Lemon Baby Cheesecake (8.00) (GF)
Blueberry syrup, meyer lemon gel, fresh berries, candied orange peel, sweet pastry crust.  Perfect for sharing.

Scoop of farm ice cream  ($3)
Ask server for today’s flavors

Lunch Menu – Week of July 10, 2018

Smoked Chorizo Sandwich

Starters & Salads

Farm Salad (7.00) (GF, vegan)
GTF salad mix, summer vegetables, toasted hazelnuts, with thyme & balsamic vinaigrette

Simply Salad (5.00) (GF, vegan)
GTF salad mix, thyme balsamic vinaigrette

Summer Vegetable Confit (7.00) (Vegan)
Tomatoes, summer squash, pearl onions, garlic, olive oil, fresh bread

Panzanella Salad (9.00) (vegan)
Cucumber, tomato, zucchini, carrot, snap pea, scallion, sherry vinaigrette, altamura croûtons

Siletz Tomato Salad (8.00) (GF, vegan)
Sweet onions, cucumber, mint, olive oil

Fish Cakes & Greens (16.00)
Pacific rockfish, potato, herbs, GTF salad mix, carrot, radish, charred chive  aioli, sherry vinaigrette

Tomato Gazpacho (6.00) (vegan)
Basil, olive oil, grilled bread

Chicken & White Bean Soup (6.00) (DF)
Herbs, grilled bread

Summer Vegetable Flatbread (8.00) (V)
Yoghurt, tomatoes, zucchini, purslane, mint


 

Wood-Fired Pizza

Margherita (11.00) (V)
Marinara, mozzarella, basil

Shiitake Mushroom, Anchovy, & White Kale (13.00) (V)
Olive oil, chevre, chili flake, purslane

Roasted Golden Beets, Fennel, & Bacon (13.00)
White sauce, parmesan

Zucchini, Carrot, & Scallion (13.00) (V)
Fontina, basil pesto


Larger Plates & Sandwiches

Reuben Sandwich (13.00) (half 7.50) (V option)
Pastrami, Isaac’s sauerkraut, swiss cheese, thousand island, rye bread, side salad

Smoked Chorizo Sandwich (13.00) (half 7.50) (DF)
Farm smoked spanish chorizo, peperonata, garlic aioli, cilantro, ciabatta bread, side salad

Summer Vegetable Sandwich (12.00)(half 7.00) (Vegan)
Marinated zucchini, butter lettuce, tomato, pea sprouts, salsa verde, Pugliese bread, side salad

Chicken Ratatouille (17.00) (GF)
Olive Oil braised GTF chicken legs, red onion, zucchini, eggplant, tomato, green pepper, white beans, pecorino romano

Summer Vegetable Plate (16.00) (GF, vegan)
Summer squash, sweet onions, carrots, tomatoes, fennel, mole verde, pumpkin seeds

Grilled Hanger Steak (22.00) (GF, DF)
Za’atar spiced potatoes, summer vegetables, salsa verde

Smoked Salmon & Fresh Tomato Pasta (17.00) (DF)
Fettuccine, tomatoes, fennel, garlic, onion, white wine, parmesan


Jules’ Sweet Treats

Boysenberry + Apricot Crisp (8.00) (GF)
Walnut, hazelnut, and coconut crumble, boysenberries, apricot, candied ginger ice cream

Chocolate Caramel Zucchini Cake (8.00) (GF)
Whiskey ganache, salted caramel, cardamom ice cream

Five-Spice Chocolate Mousse (7.00) (GF)
Dark chocolate mousse infused with house five-spice blend, boysenberry, served with fresh berries and cream

Scoop of farm ice cream  ($3)
Ask server for today’s flavors

From the farm: boysenberries, rhubarb, garlic scapes. Snap pea, zucchini, young potato, radishes, romaine, broccolini, basil, spring garlic, salad mix, chard, cilantro, radish sprouts, carrots, yellow onion, leeks,  endive, arugula, beets, cucumber, chives, tarragon, thyme, parsley, oregano, all other vegetables! (except celery and clove garlic)

CSA 2018 – Week 5: Nonstop Growth and Constant Change

CSA Newsletter – Week 5


Nonstop Growth and Constant Change

One of the many benefits of working on the farm is getting the chance to watch the plants around you grow. Every day it amazes me that we, for example, go through every cucumber and zucchini patch every single day to only pick the fruits that are perfectly ripe, a choreographed dance around our patchwork fields.

There is such a science to knowing exactly how to do this that it becomes embodied by those who have spent their lives honing their craft. Many would describe this as an art—the art of harvesting, the art of weeding, the art of pruning tomatoes—yet somehow that word doesn’t seem to quite capture the impressive amount of knowledge needed to bring these plants to fruition. Growing vegetables requires the science of harvesting, the science of hoeing, the science of pruning tomatoes, knowledges on par with any complex calculus.

At certain times of the season with cucumbers, for instance, ripeness means a dead blossom, whereas in others ripeness is more dependent on a shift in color. Yet sometimes the fruits are a little lighter because they’re planted in a field that is slightly nutrient deficient and you can’t go by the same color test as you normally do in that field in this year. Instead you have to see whether or not the ribbing is filled out or not. And then the spring planting is ripped out to make way for something else and you must become accustomed to new summer varieties. You must embrace constant change and remain flexible.

Every single vegetable that comes off of this farm is first gazed upon by someone who is looking at it in order to decide whether or not it is ready, whether or not it is good. As we each make our way through the tightly packed rows of plants bursting with fruit, we take years of experience and embodied knowledge and shove it into a single glance where we ask ourselves—should I pick this? All the while knowing that what is not ready today only awaits our asking of the same question tomorrow. In this way we are reminded that there is always a relationship before there is food.

Best, Laura Bennett


Table of Box Contents

  • Green Bell Pepper—We don’t actually grow green bell peppers, in fact, such a variety doesn’t really exist. Green bells are just unripe bell peppers that would turn color if left on the plant longer. But being “unripe” doesn’t have to mean that something is less delicious. It contains less sugars, but this just lends green bells to a more savory flavor profile than sweet.
  • Broccoli—First broccoli of the season always goes to our beloved CSA customers. Enjoy!
  • Purple Haze Carrots—bright orange inside and deep purple outside. Round slices in a salad really pop. These are also delicious roasted.
  • Jalapeno—First of the season and they’re hot! Remove seeds and webbing to cool off.
  • Tomatoes
  • Cilantro
  • Scallion—I always try to use my entire bunch of scallions all the way to the top. The greens are excellent in eggs, sautés, or in stock.
  • Zucchiniexcellent grilled whole! A few of you got Cocazelle zucchini, which are striped and have thicker skins, great for holding up on the grill.
  • Persian Cucumbers
  • Colorado Rose Potatoes
  • Lettuce—this week you have either green leaf or red leaf lettuce
  • Semi-Sweet Onion
  • Boysenberries

Recipes

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Summer Pad Thai

This is my personal pad Thai recipe that I’ve adapted. As someone who loves pad Thai and definitely never thought I could make it myself, I’m really happy with this recipe and it’s really easy to make. It’s definitely alternative as there is nut butter and not tamarind in the sauce, but it’s a delicious way to enjoy your vegetables nonetheless. Alter to your own taste as always! You can add pretty much any vegetable and as long as you chop it long and thin it’ll blend in just fine.

Author Laura Bennett

Ingredients

Veggie Saute

  • 1 bunch Cilantro (roots in saute, leaves raw as garnish)
  • 1 bunch Scallions (1/2 in saute, 1/2 raw as garnish)
  • 1/2 bunch Carrots, sliced long and thin
  • 1 Zucchini, sliced long and thin
  • 1 head Broccoli, sliced long and thin
  • 1 Sweet Onion, sliced thin
  • Oil (I use coconut)
  • Fish sauce, tamari, garlic, or whatever you'd like

Pad Thai Sauce & Noodles

  • 2/3 cup Stock (pork, chicken, or veggie)
  • 6 tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 2 tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 6-8 tbsp Brown Sugar (it may sound strange, but you can replace the sugar with strawberry jam or mashed fresh strawberries and it's delicious!)
  • 2 tbsp Fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp Soy sauce/Tamari (use 4 tbsp if you don't use fish sauce)
  • 1 tbsp Hot Sauce/Chili Oil
  • ~1 cup Nut Butter (I use peanut or sunflower seed)
  • 8 oz Pad Thai noodles (or if you have a spiralizer you can make carrot and zucchini noodles!)

Instructions

  1. Chop all your veggies up beforehand. With Pad Thai, I have found that taking care to slice things thin and long really affects the final product’s taste and beauty! Set aside.

  2. Put all sauce ingredients together in a pot (omit nut butter) and bring up to a simmer. Once it’s hot, add in your nut butter and stir around to dissolve into the sauce. You can control the thickness of the sauce depending on how much you add.

  3. Meanwhile, heat up some oil in a big pan and get your veggie stir fry going. First add in your sweet onion, and after a minute or two add in some tamari or soy sauce and let sauté another few minutes more

  4. Then add your cilantro root (everything below the twist tie), carrots, scallion, and zucchini. Let sauté about five minutes, stirring occasionally. Add a sprinkle of salt, and don’t let the veggies lose their fresh crunch!

  5. Boil some water and cook your noodles, careful not to overcook them. Drain noodles, mix into sauce to coat them.

  6. Plate the noodles, put veggies on top, and garnish with whatever you like. I suggest raw cilantro, peanuts, cucumber, and scallions. Enjoy!

 

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Swiss Chard Cakes with Greek Yogurt

Makes 6-10 cakes. 

“Greens and tart yogurt are a match made in heaven! These little cakes contain a mixture of blanched Swiss chard with ricotta, Parmesan, and herbs.” —adapted from https://food52.com/recipes/34567-swiss-chard-cakes-with-greek-yogurt

Ingredients

  • 1-2 bunches Swiss Chard
  • 4 leaves Basil, sliced thin
  • 1 cup Whole-Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1/3 cup Parmesan, grated
  • 3/4 cup Milk or Coconut Milk
  • 2 Eggs
  • 3 tbsp Ghee or Oil, plus more for frying
  • 1/3 cup Greek Yogurt

Instructions

  1. Wash and drain the chard, then place in a pot of boiling water. Cover and cook over high heat until chard is just wilted, about 2 minutes (the chard should be tender but not overcooked, so watch it carefully). When the chard is done, use a slotted spoon to transfer it to a colander to cool and drain.

  2. In a small bowl, cover the thinly sliced basil leaves with two tablespoons of the boiling water and set aside.

  3. Combine the flour, salt, and baking powder in a bowl. In a larger bowl, mix together the ricotta, Parmesan, milk, and eggs until blended. Add the ghee and basil. Whisk in the flour mixture. Return to the chard and squeeze out as much water as possible, then chop it finely. It should yield between 10-12 cups. Stir the chopped chard into the mixture until well combined.

  4. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, add a few tablespoons of ghee. Drop the batter by the spoonfuls into the hot pan, making whatever sized cake you wish, to make between 6-8 cakes. The batter is quite thick, so you must give it plenty of time to cook through (about 3 minutes per side or longer, depending on the size). They should be golden brown. Only turn the cakes once and resist the urge to pat them down.

  5. Remove the cakes from the pan and serve warm with a dollop of Greek yogurt and some fresh basil.