Lunch Menu: Week of August 21, 2018

*All items and prices subject to change

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and red wine vinaigrette 7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, hazelnuts, and red wine vinaigrette 9-

Plate of farm pickled vegetables   6-

Sourdough bread and confit of summer vegetables 8-

Charentais melon, watermelon, and cucumber salad with peach vinegar, olive oil, and feta  9-

Heirloom tomatoes, farm ricotta, balsamic reduction and basil 9-

Watermelon gazpacho with pickled watermelon rind, sesame seeds and grilled baguette   6-


Entrees

Roasted summer vegetables with black bean roasted red pepper puree and pepitas 16-      

Farfalle pasta with roasted tomato sauce, fennel sausage, roasted peppers, onions, garlic, parmesan and bread crumbs 18-

Seared albacore tuna with smoked corn and chipotle puree, roasted potatoes, summer squash, green beans and cilantro 20-

Grilled beef striploin steak with summer vegetable succotash and smoked paprika butter  23-


Sandwiches

Oregon Valley Beef pastrami on rye with farm sauerkraut, emmentaler cheese and thousand island  13 / 7.5-

Farm smoked ham, gruyere cheese, pugliese bread, farm pickles, dijon mustard 13 / 7.5-

Marinated zucchini, tomato, butter lettuce, and basil with salsa verde on pugliese bread 12 / 7-


Wood-Fired Pizzas

Classic Margherita 11-

Pizza Bianca 11-

Summer squash, blistered shishitos, and scallions with basil pesto and chives 13-   

Cherry tomato, marinated fennel, and fennel sausage with tomato sauce and mozzarella 14-

Corn, chorizo, and nardello peppers with bechamel, chevre, and cilantro 14-

CSA 2018 – Week 11: Hazy Days & Heavy Harvest – Revisiting Gratitude

CSA Newsletter – Week 11


Hazy Days & Heavy Harvest – Revisiting Gratitude

Watermelon. Cantaloupe. Tomatoes. Cherry tomatoes. Corn. Green beans. Bell peppers. Shishitos. Summer squash. Cucumbers. Salad mix hand-cut from nearly fifteen different greens. Carrots. Beets. Herbs. Chard. Potatoes. The list goes on to include just over a hundred different items that we are currently harvesting, which just goes to show how abundance is surely a double-edged sword. On top of that, the smoke in the air feels stagnant, heavy, and slow, and at times it’s difficult to breathe.

But these feelings are not new. In fact, they burbled to the surface this exact time last year. I am constantly reminded of exactly how cyclical the farming season is. This time last year we were uplifted by the 2017 full solar eclipse. I want to take you all back to that time, to the lessons that peak season had for us then that still remain true. Here goes:

There isn’t much of anything that can stop farmers from farming in the dead of August, but this celestial event sure did it. Just as the moon started peaking over the sun, we all dropped our hoes and harvest totes, grabbed some breakfast and eclipse shades, loaded into a couple flatbeds, and went out into our most expansive field to watch day turn to night and back. As I sat on the truck munching on some cantaloupe, I was overcome with a deep sense of gratitude. Gratitude for the beautiful fields of produce being showered by irrigation, for the darkening purple mountains surrounding this valley, for the hardworking fellow farmers sitting on the back of the truck with me, and for the amazing fact that the sun and the moon happen to look like they’re the same size when viewed from our planet.

This is the time of year when we are all working 60 hours a week or more; the only thing on the menu is farming with a small serving of sleep on the side. We are all exhausted and winter is still far off on the horizon, but it’s moments of gratitude that keep us going. Yes, we’re tired. Yes, it’s hot out. And yes, we still love what we do. We get to spend our days in the gorgeous Willamette Valley, growing, eating, and sharing good food together. Maybe it’s not for everyone, but I surely can’t think of anything else I’d rather do.

Though you may not be working on a farm, I’m sure life still tries its hardest to exhaust you. Hopefully this box can provide you with something to be grateful for, something to make you feel—even for just a minute—like you have everything you need in this world. We’ve all got clean drinking water, access to some of the finest fresh produce in the world, and lovely people to eat it with. Enjoy.

Best, Laura Bennett


Table of Box Contents

  • Poblano Pepper
  • Sweet Italian Pepper
  • Sweet Bell Peppers
  • Jimmy Nardello Sweet Pepper
  • Serendipity Sweet Corn
  • Basil
  • Mixed Summer Squash
  • Green Cabbage
  • Willamette Sweet Onions
  • Colorado Rose Potatoes
  • Bunched Carrots
  • Tomatoes – Our $30/20 lbs. canning tomato deal is still running! Contact our office to make a special order for your home preservation needs.
  • Romaine Lettuce – Often times I will use the outer leaves from romaine for a salad, and will retain the inner leaves, otherwise known as the heart, to dip into hummus or herbed cream cheese. 

Recipes

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One-Skillet Sausage, Peppers, Potatoes, & Onions

Author Notes: Don’t you love when the recipe title is also the ingredient list? I do. This one-skillet dish is as easy (and delicious) as a weeknight dinner gets. If spicy Italian sausages aren’t your favorite, sub in any other fresh sausage link; I bet chorizo would be great. —Emma Laperruque—adapted from https://food52.com/recipes/77606-one-skillet-sausage-peppers-potatoes-and-onions

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp Olive Oil, divided
  • 4 spicy Italian Sausages
  • 1 lb Potatoes, cut into large bite-sized chunks
  • 2 pinches Salt, plus more to taste
  • 2 Bell Peppers, roughly chopped
  • 1 large Onion, roughly chopped
  • Suggested Addition: Sweet Corn Kernels

Instructions

  1. Set a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. After it gets good and hot, add the olive oil, then the sausages. Brown all over—about 2 minutes per side—then remove to a waiting plate. We’re not trying to cook them through, just sear ’em!

  2. Add another tablespoon olive oil to the skillet, followed by the potatoes, cut side facing down. Season with a big pinch of salt. Cook these for 5 minutes until browned, then flip and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer these to the plate with the sausages.

  3. Add the remaining tablespoon olive oil, then the peppers and onion. Season with a big pinch of salt. Sauté, stirring occasionally, until tender—about 10 minutes. Add the sausages and potatoes back to the skillet. Pour 1/3 cup water evenly over the top and cover the pan with a lid.

  4. Cook for 10 to 15 minutes until the sausage is cooked through and the potatoes are tender, lifting the lid for the last few minutes. Taste and adjust the salt accordingly.

  5. This dish could also be a great breakfast served with eggs on the side.

 

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Zucchini & Basil Risotto

Adapted from the Vegetarian Bible, p. 94

Ingredients

  • Olive Oil
  • 4 Zucchini, diced
  • 1 Sweet Bell Pepper, seeded & diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 large Onion, finely chopped
  • 3-5 cups Risotta Rice
  • 4 tbsp Dry White Vermouth
  • scant 7 cups Vegetable Stock, simmering
  • 2 tbsp Unsalted Butter, at room temperature
  • large handful Fresh Basil, torn
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan

Instructions

  1. Heat 2 Tbsp of oil in a large skillet over high heat. When very hot, but not smoking, add the squash and bell pepper and stir-fry for 3 minutes, until lightly golden. Stir in the garlic and cook for about 30 seconds longer. Transfer to a plate and set aside.

  2. Heat 2 more Tbsp of oil in a large heavy pan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 2 minutes, until soft. Add the rice and cook, stirring frequently, for about 2 minutes, until the rice is translucent and well coated with olive oil.

  3. Pour in the vermouth; it will bubble and steam rapidly and evaporate almost immediately. Add a ladleful (about ½ cup) of the simmering stock and cook, stirring constantly, until the stock is completely absorbed.

  4. Continue adding the stock, about half a ladleful at a time, letting each addition be absorbed before adding the next. This should take 20-25 minutes. The risotto should have a creamy consistency and the rice should be tender, but still firm to the bite.

  5. Stir in the zucchini mixture with any juices, and the butter, basil, and grated parmesan. Drizzle with a little oil and garnish with basil. Serve hot. Tomato would be a great addition on top as well.

 

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Chicken Salad w/ Garlic Basil Aioli

At GTF we serve crew lunch to nearly 70 employees in the heat of the season. I had the very challenging but extremely rewarding opportunity to cook for everyone a few weeks ago, and this dish was a big hit. I loved it because it was an easy way to feed a ton of people something that was delicious and healthy, and everyone else loved it because it is full of protein but is nice and cool, perfect for farmers to get through a day in the heat. Many people think of aioli or mayonnaise as unhealthy because it is high in fat, but fat is not the enemy—sugar is.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cabbage, grated or sliced thinly
  • 1/2 Chicken, roasted whole, cooled, and shredded
  • Walnuts
  • Dried Cranberries
  • Raw Veg Additions: Sweet Corn, Sweet Peppers, Grated Carrot
  • Aioli/Mayo

If you feel like making aioli from scratch, get an egg and some oil and a blender and emulsify away! If not, buy some mayonnaise from the store—no shame! Either way, mix in the following:

  • minced Raw Garlic
  • half bunch of Basil, finely chopped
  • lemon juice
  • salt & pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Mix together all ingredients

Lunch Menu: Week of August 14, 2018

*All items and prices subject to change

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and balsamic vinaigrette 7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, hazelnuts, and balsamic vinaigrette 9-

Sourdough bread and herb butter 6-

Charentais melon, watermelon, and cucumber salad with peach vinegar, olive oil, and feta  9-

Heirloom tomatoes, farm ricotta, balsamic reduction and basil 9-

Siletz tomato gazpacho and grilled baguette 6-



Entrees

Roasted summer vegetables with mole verde and pepitas 16-      

Sweet corn & chevre filled agnolotti with fresh tomatoes, green beans, and bread crumbs 17-

Seared albacore tuna with romesco, roasted potatoes, peppers, sweet onions and fennel oil 20-

Farm chicken breast roasted in our wood-fired oven, fennel, sweet onions, shallots peppers, cherry tomatoes, and summer squash  18-


Sandwiches

Oregon Valley Beef pastrami on rye with farm sauerkraut, emmentaler cheese and thousand island  13 / 7.5-

Farm smoked chorizo on ciabatta bread with peperonata, garlic aioli, and cilantro 13 / 7.5-

Marinated zucchini, tomato, butter lettuce, basil, with salsa verde on pugliese bread 12 / 7-


Wood-Fired Pizzas

Classic Margherita 11-

 Pizza Bianca 11-

Summer squash, blistered shishitos, and scallions with basil pesto and dill flowers 13-   

Cherry tomato, marinated radicchio, and white anchovy with tomato sauce and mozzarella 14-

Corn, chorizo, and roasted peppers with olive oil, feta, and cilantro 14-


Dessert

Chocolate sourdough cake with cinnamon infusion, apricot, chocolate cremeux, and chantilly.     8-

Peach Semifreddo, genoise, peach and boysenberry compote  8-

Rhubarb custard pie with lattice crust vanilla ice cream        and rhubarb compote.                7-

Scoop of daily ice cream   3-

CSA 2018 – Week 10: Home Canning—Preserving Summer with Bulk Deals

CSA 2018 – Week 10


Home Canning—Preserving Summer with Bulk Deals

Home food preservation, an activity that was once necessary to get through the winter, has gone from being a dead art to being revived once again. More and more people are trying their hand at food preservation, whether it be canning, freezing, drying, or fermenting. Although we don’t need to preserve food to make it through the winter anymore, food preservation is one of the best ways to get high quality organic produce for the lowest price, and it can be super fun.

In addition to being incredibly cost effective, larger food projects can be a great activity with friends and family. Everyone gathers around in the kitchen to share in a simple task, such as coring tomatoes, snapping green beans, or chopping herbs, all the while just hanging out.

Also, food preservation doesn’t have to mean canning. Canning can be intimidating even if you’re experienced with it. It takes a lot of time and everything has to be sanitary. Most people are worried about getting botulism from their canning projects, but this is a concern that is often blown pretty far out of proportion. The vast majority of botulism cases in the US are related to a particular fish product common in Alaska, and potato salad that has sat out too long at picnics. Approved canning recipes have already gone above and beyond with regard to safety. So, while sanitation is still important, there’s no need to feel like you’re in a life or death situation as you make your sauce. Where’s the fun in that? But even so, I often time make big batches of sauces or jams and simply split up the bounty with friends to enjoy fresh or freeze it in ziplock bags. The freezer is an especially attractive option when your sauce-making takes longer than intended and you don’t feel like canning into the night.

For the next few couple weeks, we will be selling 20 lb. cases of Canning Tomatoes for $30, which comes out to $2.00/lb., 33% lower than our lowest market rate. If you would like to make a special order for canning tomatoes and other ingredients at discounted rates, please call our office at 541-929-4270 or email us at gtf@gatheringtogetherfarm.com with Special Order in the subject line. For smaller food projects, simply visit us at one of our booths at the farmers’ market.

Best, Laura Bennett


Table of Box Contents

  • Watermelon Surprise— GTF is known for its multi-colored watermelon. We have crowds surrounding our sample table all summer long, all waiting to taste the difference between red, orange, and yellow watermelon. People at market often ask us what we did to the melons to make them different colors. The reality is that there are multiple varieties of watermelon, kales, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, and all crops, that are different shapes, sizes, and colors, yet only a few make it into mainstream grocery stores. Red watermelon is simply the most common. This week our CSA members are getting an assortment of watermelon, so you’ll have to wait to cut your melon open to see which color you got!
  • Green Beans—As always, our Crockett green beans are incredibly tender, eaten both raw or cooked. And as always, my favorite way to enjoy them is to remove the stems, and stir fry the beans with onion, garlic, and tamari.
  • Sweet Bell Pepper
  • Eggplant
  • Broccoli
  • Moss Parsley
  • Red Beets with Greens
  • Willamette Sweet Onions
  • Purple Majesty Potatoes—these are purple all the way throughout and will maintain their color best roasted rather than boiled.
  • Garlic—this is the best garlic year the farm has had in years. We’re loving those fat cloves!
  • Persian Cucumbers
  • Slicer Tomatoes
  • Lettuce Surprise

Recipes

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Ajvar - Roasted Pepper & Eggplant Spread

“There aren’t too many rules when it comes to ajvar recipes and uses, including the way it’s served. I’ve had it as a condiment with grilled fish and meats, in a sandwich for some oomph, or slathered on a cracker with a drizzle of olive oil and a crumble or smear of whatever goat or feta cheese I can get my hands on. Then I daydream and forget about car troubles, sticky summer heat, and dream of the next time I can get back to those gorgeous seas and summers of Croatia.”—adapted from http://saltandwind.com/recipes/370-ajvar-roasted-pepper-and-eggplant-dip-recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs Colored Bell Peppers
  • 1 small Eggplant
  • 3 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 1 small handful Chives or Parsley
  • 1 tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 1 tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Cane Sugar
  • 1/4 tsp Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 450°F and arrange racks in the upper third. Halve each pepper, discarding stems and seeds. Place peppers, cut side down, on a baking sheet lined with foil. Cut eggplant in half lengthwise and drizzle it with about 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and a little salt and place it, cut-side down, on the baking sheet. Roast the peppers and eggplant until they are blackened, blistered, and the eggplant collapses when you press on it, about 30 minutes.

  2. Remove the eggplant and set it aside to cool slightly. Remove the peppers, place them in a bowl, and cover with plastic wrap until the peppers have slightly cooled, at least 5 minutes. Use a spoon to remove the pulp of the eggplant from the skin and discard the skin. Put eggplant in a food processor with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and the garlic. Pulse the eggplant a few times so that it’s roughly chopped.

  3. Once peppers are cool enough to handle, peel them (reserving any juices that collect), discard the peel, and add the peppers and 2 to 3 tablespoons of the pepper liquid to the food processor. Add the chives and pulse 5 to 8 times to chop coarsely. Stir in the lemon juice, vinegar, red pepper flakes, and sugar. Taste and add more sugar if it is a bit sour, then add salt and freshly ground black pepper, as desired. 

Recipe Notes

Tip—Ajvar can be made up to 4 days ahead of time; store refrigerated in an airtight container and bring to room temperature before serving. Taste and stir in more vinegar, sugar, salt, or olive oil as desired.  You can also grill the peppers and eggplant.

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Broccoli & Pepper Jack Frittata

Adapted from Brassicas—Cooking the world’s healthiest vegetables

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 cups Broccoli florets, bite size
  • 2 tbsp Water
  • 6 Eggs
  • Salt & Pepper
  • 1 cup Pepper Jack Cheese, shredded

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Put the oil and garlic in a 10-12 inch non-stick frying pan and place over medium heat. When the garlic starts to sizzle, add the broccoli, stir to coat it with the oil, and cook for about 2 minutes. Stir in ¼ teaspoon of the salt and the water and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes, until the broccoli is tender.

  2. Meanwhile, in a bowl, beat the eggs with the remaining ½ tsp salt and the pepper until blended. When the broccoli is ready, sprinkle the cheese evenly over it and then add the eggs to the pan. Cook for about 2 minutes, until the eggs are set around the edges.

  3. Transfer the pan to the oven and bake for 8-10 minutes, until the eggs are just set. A knife inserted into the frittata should come out clean. Remove from the oven and carefully slide the frittata out onto a serving plate.

 

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Basil-Garlic Tomato Sauce

Ingredients

  • 20 lb Tomatoes
  • 1 cup Chopped Onion
  • 8 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1/4 cup Basil, minced
  • 1 tbsp Lemon Juice per hot jar
  • 7 pint jars (or 3 quart jars)

Instructions

  1. PREPARE boiling water canner. Heat jars and lids in simmering water until ready for use. Do not boil. Set bands aside.

  2. WASH tomatoes; drain. Remove core and blossom ends. Cut into quarters. Set aside.

  3. SAUTE onion and garlic in olive oil until transparent. Add tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

  4. PUREE tomato mixture in a food processor or blender, working in batches. Strain puree to remove seeds and peel.

  5. COMBINE tomato puree and basil in large saucepot. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until volume is reduced by half, stirring to prevent sticking.

  6. ADD 1 Tbsp bottled lemon juice to each hot pint jar; Add 2 Tbsp. bottled lemon juice to each hot quart jar. Ladle hot sauce into hot jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rim. Center hot lid on jar. Apply band and adjust until fit is fingertip tight. Place jar in boiling water canner. Repeat until all jars are filled.

  7. PROCESS pint jars for 35 minutes and quart jars for 40 minutes. Remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then remove jars and cool. check lids for seal after 24 hours; they should not flex up and down when center is pressed. 

Dinner Menu: August 9-11, 2018

*All items and prices subject to change

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and balsamic vinaigrette  7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, hazelnuts, and balsamic vinaigrette  9-

Sourdough bread and summer vegetable confit  7-

Desert king figs with with farm labneh, honey, walnuts, mint, and olive oil  8-

Smoked salmon rillettes with frisee salad, cherry tomatoes, capers, and lemon vinaigrette  9-

Charentais melon, watermelon, and cucumber salad with peach vinegar, olive oil, and feta  9-

Heirloom tomatoes, farm ricotta, balsamic reduction and basil  9-

Siletz tomato gazpacho and grilled baguette  6-


Entrees

Roasted summer vegetables with mole verde and pepitas  16-

Corn and chevre-filled agnolotti pasta with wild mushrooms, fresh tomatoes, green beans and bread crumbs  19-

Seared albacore tuna with romesco, roasted potatoes, peppers, sweet onions and fennel oil  23-

Braised pork shoulder with fennel puree, braised chard, bacon lardons, and poached figs  20-

Farm chicken thigh roasted in our wood-fired oven, fennel, sweet onions, shallots peppers, cherry tomatoes, and summer squash  18-

Oregon Valley Farm beef osso bucco with creamy polenta, roasted summer vegetables, and gremolata  24-


Wood-Fired Pizzas

Classic Margherita  11-

Pizza Bianca  11-

Summer squash, blistered shishitos, and scallions with basil pesto and dill flowers  13-

Cherry tomato, marinated radicchio, and fennel sausage with tomato sauce and chevre  14-

Corn, chorizo, and roasted peppers with olive oil, feta, and cilantro  14-


-August on the Farm-

The Art of Noticing

In the Pacific Northwest, July is almost always home to the first real heat wave of summer, producing a thousand new things for farmers to see and do. The crops seem to be doubling in size every few days, and the weeds are as well. Suddenly the hoop houses that have been
giving our hot-weather crops the head start they need are holding more heat than the plants can withstand. We respond by mixing mud in a wheel barrel and slinging it onto the houses to create
shade. The more energy the sun gives us in a day, the more the plants capture, and the more work there is for us all to do. We know that we can’t get to everything on the to-do list every day,
and so we work as hard as we can to do as much as we can to get the beautiful summer vegetables onto your plates.

One of the many benefits of working on the farm is getting the chance to watch the plants grow all around us. For example, we go through every cucumber and zucchini patch every single
day to pick the fruits that are newly, daily, perfectly ripe. It’s a choreographed dance around our patch-worked fields.
There is such a science to knowing exactly how to do this that it becomes embodied by those who have spent their lives honing their craft. Many would describe this as an art—the art of
harvesting, the art of weeding, the art of pruning tomatoes— farming really is an art. Yet somehow that word doesn’t seem to quite capture the impressive amount of knowledge
needed to bring these plants to fruition. Growing vegetables requires the science of harvesting, the science of hoeing, the science of pruning tomatoes, knowledges on par with any complex
calculus.

Every single vegetable that comes off of this farm and has made it onto your plate was first looked upon by someone who was deciding whether or not it was ready to harvest. As we each make our way through the tightly packed rows of plants bursting with fruit, we take years of experience and embodied knowledge and shove it into a single glance where we ask ourselves—should I pick this? All the while knowing that what is not ready today only awaits
our asking of the same question tomorrow. There is always a relationship before there is food.