November 12th Market Recipes ft. Fioretto Cauliflower

A big thanks to everyone who made it down to market this week! Our Corvallis and Beaverton outdoor markets will only have one more Saturday left in the season until next spring, so make sure to take advantage before winter. Being in customer service at a farmers’ market in Oregon has been heavy this past week to say the least. I hope we can all seek comfort in the bounty of our local farms, sharing good food with our friends and family. We are perennial, and even if we lose our leaves, the frost will not be fatal. Here are some cozy fall recipes to warm you up, straight from our sample station at the Corvallis Farmers’ Market.img_3162-2

  • Braised Fioretto Cauliflower
  • Kabocha Squash with Medusa Red Kale
  • Celeriac with Lacinato Black Kale

*Note: Any time that you find your sauté pan dry in the middle of the cooking process, add more oil! Fats get a bad rap these days, but being liberal with olive oil in a vegetable sauté probably never harmed anyone.

Braised Fioretto Cauliflower

Broccoli has a well-known cousin named broccoli raab, a non-heading variety with its own unique flavor and texture. Cauliflower turns out to have a cousin of its own called Fioretto Cauliflower Sticks. At first glance, they sort of look like broccoli raab that’s been sitting around one too many weeks, but do not be perturbed by their pale color. img_3187-3-700-pixels-wideToday was my first day tasting these conspicuous florets, and I was surprised how delicious they were. They have a much sweeter taste than cauliflower, with a smooth, fresh texture. Though I ended up sautéing them at market, I firmly believe they are destined for the grill!

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 2 bu. Fioretto cauliflower sticks
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Chop off the very bottom of the cauliflower sticks while they’re still in a bunch. Then, slice the larger sprigs lengthwise and keep the smaller sprigs as is.
    • Heat up olive oil in your pan to medium high. Add in the cauliflower sticks, and let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Remove lid, add in a pinch or two of salt, and continue to cook uncovered until tender another 2-5 minutes, depending on desired crispness.
    • Serve as is, just like asparagus!

Kabocha Squash with Medusa Red Kaleimg_3184-2

Kabocha and other large squashes lend themselves to easy baking, but being limited to a frying pan at market forces me to cook in creative ways. Trust me, if you stir fry kabocha once, you might never go back. Kabocha is a dry yet intensely flavorful squash, with the sweet and savory flavor similar to a roasted chestnut. Cooking it in the frying pan takes hardly ten minutes, as there is very little water to cook out, and you end up with bites of creamy squash encased within crisp edges.20161113_113149

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • ½ Kabocha squash, sliced thin
    • 2 large shallots, finely chopped
    • ½ head garlic (Goodfoot Farm)
    • ½ bu. Medusa red kale
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Cutting up the big kabocha squash while it’s raw is the hardest part of this recipe. Be safe, take your time, and don’t chop your fingers off however tempting it may be. Follow the chopping tutorial at right, and set aside.
    • Finely chop your shallots.
    • Heat a pan of olive oil up to medium-high temp and add in the shallots, letting cook 2-4 minutes.
    • Add in the kabocha squash slices and stir around. Let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop garlic and add into the pan, continuing to cook uncovered another 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop up ½ bunch of Medusa red kale and add it into the pan along with 2-3 pinches of salt, stirring around to distribute evenly. Let cook another 2-3 minutes until done to taste, but before the kabocha turns to mush! It’s a race against time, but it’ll always turn out delicious.

Celeriac with Lacinato Black Kaleimg_3191-2

I fondly refer to celeriac as “instant chicken soup,” as celery is a common ingredient in chicken soup and celeriac tastes like a savory version of celery. And let’s get real, nobody walks up to a celeriac and says, “oh boy, does that look delicious,” unless they’re being sarcastic. But if you can make it past their gnarly exterior, you will make your way to a wonderfully sweet and savory treasure.20161113_113253

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 1 celeriac (celery root), sliced thin
    • 1 bu. Lacinato black kale
    • 2 large shallots
    • ½ head garlic (Goodfoot Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • To cut into a celeriac, I first slice off the top and then set it flat-side-down on the cutting board. Then, I take my knife and carefully shave off the skin, including all the gnarled root hairs. You’re left with a chunk of soft white root, which you can then cut into thin slices, as seen in the chopping tutorial at right. Set aside.
    • Finely chop your shallots.
    • Heat a pan of olive oil up to medium-high temp and add in the shallots, letting cook 2-4 minutes.
    • Add in the celeriac slices and stir around. Let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop garlic and add into the pan, continuing to cook uncovered another 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop up ½ bunch of Lacinato black kale and add it into the pan along with 2-3 pinches of salt, stirring around to distribute evenly. Let cook another 2-3 minutes until done to taste.
    • This sauté is delicious on its own, and on occasion when I accidentally overcook the celeriac and it becomes mushy, I’ll just puree the whole thing with cream to make a quick hearty soup with amazing flavor.

 

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