2019 CSA – Week 12: Embodied Knowledge & the Art of Noticing

CSA Newsletter – Week 12


Embodied Knowledge & the Art of Noticing

Hello, veggie-lovers! We’ve got an amazing box of peak season Pacific Northwest produce for you this week! August and September are our biggest months. At no other time of year is there this much to harvest, so much work to do, so much to eat! We’re tired all the time, but we’ll sleep later when the plants do. Maybe we’re crazy, but we love it.

Our Mediterranean summers are a marathon of long, hot, dry days. With so much sunlight being captured every day, the crops seem to double in size before our eyes, as do the weeds. We have over a hundred different crops to harvest every week, only when they’re at their best, in their prime, not too young or too old. There are so many things to notice right now, and through exhaustion we must keep our eyes peeled. It’s time to make hay while the sun shines!

To farm is to always be thinking ahead to the next season while keeping your balance as you walk on the ground in front of you. Time changes when you watch plants grow. You experience time at their scale, their frantic scramble to photosynthesize that we follow in our own chaotic choreographed dance around our patch-worked fields.

There is such an art and a science to knowing exactly how to harvest everything at its peak perfection, to know how the crops change throughout the season, it all becomes embodied by those who have spent years honing their craft. Growing vegetables requires a combined mental and physical knowledge that only time and experience can give you. It requires the science of harvest, the engineering of tomato pruning, the mindfulness of weeding, knowledge on par with any complex calculus.

Every single vegetable and fruit that made it into your box was first looked upon by someone who was deciding whether or not it was ready to harvest. As we each make our way through tightly packed rows of plants bursting forth with life and fruit, we take years of experience and embodied knowledge and shove it into a single glance where we ask ourselves—should I pick this? All the while knowing that what is not ready today only awaits our asking of the same question tomorrow. Food is embodied knowledge, a physical bridge that connects us. Our relationships are always embodied in our food.

Best,
LB

Table of Box Contents

  • 1 Candy-loupe—Part cantaloupe, part Galia (a green-fleshed cantaloupe from Southeast Asia), this larger cantaloupe is intensely sweet and everything one could want in a melon. If you somehow don’t just devour it all in one sitting sliced up or with a spoon, this is an amazing melon to slice up into a salad with feta and basil, or to have for breakfast in the morning cut in half with yogurt and granola in the center.
  • 1 bu. Basil—Although basil is amazing chopped into salads in large quantities, whole leaves and all, pesto really is the bees knees. A true pesto with pine nuts is always lovely, but never feel boxed in when making a pesto! I often blend up whatever nut I have (walnut, almond, not peanut for some reason), and blend it with basil, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, garlic, and parmesan cheese.
  • 1 Shallot—We’ve been waiting for these flavor bombs all season! Dried shallots are even more potent like their garlic parent than their fresh-bunched past selves were. Enjoy!
  • 1 Sweet Italian Pepper—This week you’ll get either a yellow or a red sweet Italian. On the farm we often eat these sweet treats like apples as is. But they are also delicious sliced thinly into salads, and slaws.
  • 1 head Broccoli
  • 4 ears Serendipity Sweet Corn
  • 1 Green Bell Pepper
  • Tomatoes
  • Romaine Lettuce
  • 1 bu. Carrots
  • 2 Willamette Sweet Onions
  • 1.5 lb. Potatoes

Recipes

Pesto Potato Tomato Salad

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line 2 sheet pans with parchment paper.

  2. In a glass baking dish, toss quartered tomatoes with olive oil, salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer. On the other sheet pan, toss the potatoes with the remaining olive oil, salt and
    pepper, and place cut-side down.

  3. Roast for 20-25 minutes until the tomatoes have let loose some of their water and are looking golden to a bit charred. Continue roasting the potatoes for an additional 20-25 minutes until they are golden brown and tender when pierced with a paring knife.

  4.  In a large bowl, toss the potatoes with the pesto, and gently fold in the tomatoes and chives.

 

Broccoli & Caramelized Onion Baked Eggs

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1/2 Sweet Onion, sliced
  • 1/2 Shallot, sliced
  • 1 tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
  • 1/2 head of Broccoli, broken into small pieces
  • 2 Eggs
  • Salt & freshly ground Pepper

Instructions

  1. Heat olive oil in a frying pan, add the onions, cook covered for 5-10 minutes over a medium heat, stirring occasionally.

  2. Remove the lid, add balsamic vinegar, season with salt and freshly ground pepper, cook over a high heat for another 5 minutes, stirring often, until caramelized.

  3. In the meantime, place the broccoli in a heatproof bowl, pour over boiling water to cover the broccoli completely. Let it stand for 5 minutes, then drain the water.

  4. Add the broccoli in the pan. Make two wells and crack in the eggs. Cover with a lid and cook over a medium heat for 5-10 minutes, depending on how runny you like your yolk. Enjoy!