2017 CSA – Week 3: Feasibly Delicious Foods

CSA Newsletter – Week 3


Feasibly Delicious Foods

Hello everyone, it’s the official first CSA box of summer, woo! With all this sunshine production is really picking up. Your boxes will be fuller by the week until you can hardly carry them home.

I wanted to take a moment to let you all know what my intentions are with the CSA Newsletters this season. Though my life revolves around vegetables, it certainly has not always been that way. Pretty much the only vegetable that I ate growing up was baby carrots, and the rest of my diet was processed food either from a box or from a drive through (there’s nothing quite like instant mashed potatoes, is there?). Needless to say, this city girl had no idea what she was doing when she started working at a farm!

Throughout my years with this farm, I have gotten to know and fallen in love with the vast variety of vegetables that can be grown in the Willamette Valley, most of which I had never laid eyes on let alone tasted. Many of you are experienced cooks and for you I will be sure to include some more intricate recipes that will wow your guests and offer more complex flavor combinations.

But what I intend to focus on is what I like to call feasible deliciousness. Even as a farmer, it nearly impossible to find the time to cook a meal at home these days, and so if we want to eat lots of veggies and stay healthy, the simpler the better. I want to help you all learn more about the lesser known veggies, learn easy and quick ways to make them delicious and filling, and hopefully inspire you all to love and appreciate vegetables as much as I have come to.

First and foremost, never feel like you have to follow a recipe exactly. I encourage you to eyeball measurements, replace ingredients with whatever you have on hand, and use a spice not listed if it calls to you. Always have fun, and don’t take anything too seriously. Feel free to contact me with cooking or farming questions any time! But please remember to send all logistical CSA questions to csa@gatheringtogetherfarm.com , thank you!

-Laura Bennett, markets@gatheringtogetherfarm.com

Table of Box Contents

  • Beets—Sweet, earthy, and beautifully bright. If you or some of your family members are in the I-hate-beets club, look into different ways to prepare them. It’s rare that we actually don’t like something, we often just don’t like the way we’ve had it before.
  • 5 lbs New PotatoesNewly dug potatoes are very high in water content, so make sure if you’re making a crispy potato dish that you find a way to remove some of the water, either via pre-boiling, pre-baking, or by pressing with a cloth.
  • Dill—A little dill goes a long way, and provides such a delicate freshness and texture to any dish.
  • Spinach—Our spinach is at its prime right now; it doesn’t like the heat of summer much, so it’s just in the edges of summer that it is particularly beautiful.
  • Lettuce—Various varieties
  • 2 Sweet OnionsHigh sugar content that makes them perfect for caramelizing.
  • 4 Cucumbers—Eat fresh like an apple or slice into salads for a nice, sweet crunch. We have two varieties coming this week, you can taste and decide which is your favorite!
  • 2-3 Zucchini—Make sure when you cook zucchini to salt at the end of the cooking process so it doesn’t turn to mush!

Recipes

Beet Slaw with Pistachios and Raisins

This recipe is from one of my favorite new cookbooks, Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden, head chef at Ava Gene’s in Portland, a wonderful restaurant that our farm sells produce too. Enjoy!

“The pistachio butter underneath the slaw is like an Asian peanut sauce, bringing a much fuller nut flavor than the pistachios could offer alone. As you eat the dish, the juices from the slaw dissolve the pistachio butter and make a crazy good sort of vinaigrette.  Serves 4”

  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • ½ cup golden raisins
  • 2 Tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 ¼ lb. beets; use a mix of colors if you can
  • 2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • ½ cup lightly packed flat-leaf parsley leaves (substitute dill, since that’s what you have)
  • ¼ cup lightly packed mint leaves
  • ½ tsp dried chili flakes
  • Salt and pepper
  • Olive oil
  • Pistachio butter

Combine the garlic, raisins, and vinegar in a large bowl and let sit for 1 hour.

Grate the beets on the large holes of a box grater or cut into fine julienne. Yes, your hands will get stained, but the color fades quickly.

Remove the garlic from the raisins and discard. And the beets, lemon juice, most of the parsley and mint (save the rest for finishing), and chili flakes. Season with 1.5 tsp salt and lots of black pepper and toss. Let it sit for about 5 minutes and then taste—the slaw should be tart, spicy, peppery, and sweet. Adjust the seasoning, if necessary, then add ¼ cup olive oil. Toss and taste again.

To serve, plate and top with the slaw. Finish with reserved fresh herbs and a drizzle of olive oil.

Crispy Buttery Smashed Potatoes

-Portland Farmers Market Cookbook by Ellen Jackson

  • 5-2 lbs. potatoes, unpeeled
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2-3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 4 Tbsp butter, melted and divided
  • 1 tsp minced garlic
  • 2 tsp finely chopped herbs (rosemary, thyme, parsley, chives, dill, etc.)

Add the potatoes to a large pot and cover them with cold water by several inches. Generously salt  the water and bring it to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook the potatoes until just before they are fork-tender, about 10 minutes. Drain the potatoes in a colander and let them cool for 10 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Lightly coat a baking sheet with the oil. Evenly space the boiled potatoes out across the sheet and, using a small glass or a fork lightly coated with oil, gently flatten each potato by pressing down until it mashes into an oblong shape. Brush the potatoes generously with 2 Tbsp of the melted butter, sprinkle them with salt and pepper to taste, and bake them for 10 minutes. Add the garlic and herbs to the remaining 2 Tbsp butter, brush the potatoes again, and bake until they are golden brown and crispy, about 8-10 minutes more.

Simple Cucumber Salad

I make this all the time at home for munching, usually to get me through to my next big meal. This cucumber salad takes hardly five minutes to prepare, and is a wonderful snack or side dish on a hot summer day. In a large bowl, mix together the following ingredients, and add more of anything to taste.

  • 3-4 Cucumbers, sliced into discs
  • 1/3 bunch Dill, finely chopped
  • Lemon juice to taste (I often use vinegar if I don’t have any lemons on hand.)
  • Salt to taste, 2-3 pinches

2017 CSA – Week 2: The Gathering Together Story

CSA Newsletter – Week 2


The Gathering Together Story

With this being our 30th anniversary farming, I thought it would be nice to tell you all the tale of how Gathering Together Farm came to be such a well-known farm in the valley.

Owners John Eveland and Sally Brewer both come from farming families—John being from Iowa and Sally from New Hampshire— and though they loved to farm, they wanted to break free from the limited selection of vegetables that were commonly grown. GTF grows many of the same types of foods that we are all used to, but they grow almost 500 different varieties of them, from newly bred black tomatoes to nearly forgotten heirloom varieties of Asian greens.

In the eighties, John, his sister, and a couple friends started Nearly Normal’s Restaurant in Corvallis, and they were dissatisfied with the lack of organic produce available for them to use. John and Sally decided to start their own farm to provide the restaurant with quality, organic produce, and before they knew it, thirty years had gone by and they had one of the most well-known organic vegetable farms in the valley. This is largely what gives Gathering Together its human feel; for a farm as big as GTF, John and Sally have managed to maintain a small family farm feel. After all these years they are both still sweating in the sunshine every day with the rest of us!

Working at GTF is unlike working at most any other place. We are all fed breakfast every day, lunch three days a week, and we get free vegetables to take home to our families. I couldn’t imagine more amazing benefits, and we are all grateful for the generosity that John and Sally put forth into the world.

From all of us at the farm base who have put endless hours working in the sun and soil, rain or shine, flood or freeze, thank you for being a part of our farm and for enjoying the produce that we grow. We are forever grateful for the time that you’ll spend with Gathering Together Farm. Enjoy your weekly bounty. Thanks y’all!

-Laura Bennett

Table of Box Contents

  • Chard—Chard greens and stems are both delicious. The stems are like a beet-flavored rainbow version of celery. The greens are similar to spinach and are amazing raw in a salad.
  • Bunch Carrots—Oh my goodness you guys, they’re so sweet! Such a special spring treat.
  • Scallions—In my opinion scallions are best enjoyed raw, sliced thin on top of everything.
  • 5 lbs New PotatoesThis week you’ll be getting Nicola potatoes, a yellow skinned and yellow fleshed potato.
  • Romaine lettuce—Everyone loves romaine lettuce for its crunch, making it perfect for caesar salads, etc.
  • Cilantro—Excellent on top of almost any dish. If you’re having a hard time using the whole bunch up, try making a cilantro pesto. You can use local walnuts or hazelnuts for a cheaper pine nut alternative.
  • 2 Sweet OnionsThe high sugar content in these onions makes them perfect for caramelizing.
  • 2 Cucumbers—Eat fresh like an apple or slice into salads for a nice, sweet crunch.
  • 2 Zucchini—Make sure when you cook zucchini to salt at the end of the cooking process so it doesn’t turn to mush!

Recipes

Spring Pad Thai

This is my personal pad thai recipe that I’ve adapted over the past few years. It’s definitely alternative (I don’t use tamarind because I never have any on hand), and it’s super easy to make. Alter to your own taste as always! You can use almost any selection of vegetables, green beans are a great addition but they aren’t in yet, but we’re in luck that we have many other perfect  veggies.

Ingredients—Veggie Sauté

  • 1 bunch Cilantro (roots in sauté, leaves raw as garnish)
  • 1 bunch Scallions (1/2 in sauté, ½ raw as garnish)
  • ½ bunch Carrots, sliced long and thin
  • 1 Zucchini, sliced long and thin
  • 1 Sweet Onion, sliced thin
  • Oil (I use coconut)
  • Fish Sauce, Tamari, garlic, or whatever you’d like

Ingredients—Pad Thai Sauce & Noodles
(If you like things light, follow this recipe; if you like things super saucy, double the sauce recipe!)

  • 2/3 cup Stock (pork, chicken, or veggie)
  • 6 Tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 6-8 Tbsp Brown Sugar (it may sound strange, but you can supplement the sugar for strawberry jam and it’s delicious!)
  • 2 Tbsp Fish Sauce
  • 2 Tbsp Soy Sauce/Tamari (use 4 Tbsp if you don’t use fish sauce)
  • 1 Tbsp Hot Sauce/Chili Oil
  • ~1 cup Nut Butter (I use peanut or sunflower seed)
  • 1 8oz package Pad Thai noodles (or if you have a spiralizer you can make carrot and zucchini noodles!)

Directions

  1. Chop all your veggies up beforehand. With Pad Thai, I have found that taking care to slice things thin and long really affects the final product’s taste and beauty! Set aside.
  2. Put all sauce ingredients together in a pot (omit nut butter) and bring up to a simmer. Once it’s hot, add in your nut butter and stir around to dissolve into the sauce. You can control the thickness of the sauce depending on how much you add.
  3. Meanwhile, heat up some oil in a big pan and get your veggie stir fry going. First add in your sweet onion, and after a minute or two add in some tamari or soy sauce and let sauté another few minutes more.
  4. Then add your cilantro root (everything below the twist tie), carrots, scallion, and zucchini. Let sauté about five minutes, stirring occasionally. Add a sprinkle of salt, and don’t let the veggies lose their fresh crunch!
  5. Boil some water and cook your noodles, careful not to overcook them. Drain noodles, mix into sauce to coat them.
  6. Plate noodles, put veggies on top, and garnish with raw cilantro and scallions. Enjoy!

Marinated Tofu with Swiss Chard

Source Note: This savory vegan dish calls for marinating the tofu a few hours ahead. It can be served over white or brown rice, or with any type of noodles…like Pad Thai!

Ingredients

  • ½ pound firm tofu
  • Marinade
    • 1 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
    • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil
    • 2 tsp Sesame Seed Oil
    • 2 Tbsp Garlic Chives/Scallion, minced
    • 2 tsp Ginger, minced
    • Pinch of red pepper flakes
    • 1 ½ Tbsp Tamari or Bragg Liquid Aminos
  • 1 bunch Swiss Chard
  • 1 Tbsp Sesame Seeds

Directions

  1. Drain the tofu and cut into cubes.
  2. In a medium bowl, mix all of the marinade ingredients.
  3. Set the tofu cubes in the marinade, toss gently, and marinate for at least 2 hours at room temperature, turning the cubes over occasionally.
  4. Setting aside the tofu, pour the marinade into a skillet on medium heat; simmer 1-2 minutes, until reduced by about half.
  5. Add the Swiss Chard and cover the pan. Continue simmering, stirring occasionally, until the green wilt.
  6. Add the tofu back in, sprinkle with the sesame seeds, stir to combine, and heat through. Serve immediately.

Recipe from Bounty From the Box: The CSA Farm Cookbook by Mi Ae Lipe

2017 CSA – Week 1: Greetings from Your Farmers

CSA Newsletter – Week 1


Greetings from Your Farmers

Welcome to our 20th CSA season, everyone! This year also happens to be our 30th year growing vegetables in the Willamette Valley, and it is an honor to continue providing quality produce to our community. Your contribution as a CSA member provided a much needed kick start to our off-season allowing us to do things such as purchase seed and prep ground. As many of you may know, it’s been a particularly rough winter and spring for farming with all the rain we’ve had, so we appreciate your support that much more. The next 21 weeks of vegetables is our way of saying thank you.

This year we have a new system for CSA where rather than having one coordinator who does everything, we have a small crew of people devoted to bringing you your box. Marina, who has been a part of our farming family her whole life, will be managing box packing and produce selection. Will, who you’ve all been communicating with already, is new to the farm this year and is the official CSA Coordinator. And I am the Farmers’ Market Coordinator and self-proclaimed Vegecator, ready to spread the love of vegetables with you all through this newsletter. I invite you all to view your CSA box not just as a box full of fresh, organic produce at a discounted rate, but also as an educational opportunity to learn about where your food comes from and easy ways to enjoy it. It’s going to be a journey through the seasons!

The CSA Newsletter is a way for me to share a little bit about the contents of each box, let you in on what’s going on at the farm, and share ideas about ways to prepare your weekly supply of veggies in a feasibly delicious way. We would also love to hear from you! Share your favorite recipes or preparation methods, pictures, or questions. If you are social media savvy, you can find us on Facebook and Instagram at @gatheringtogetherfarm and hashtag your pictures and comments with #gtfcsa so that we can find you! I will be sure to share tips, and recipes in future newsletters.

Thanks again for all your support. It’s going to be a delicious year!

– Laura Bennett
markets@gatheringtogetherfarm.com

Table of Box Contents

  • 1 bunch Basil ($3.00)
  • Fresh Garlic ($1.50) – Enjoy the savory wonder of garlic without having to peel it! It’s a game changer, folks.
  • 5 lbs New Potatoes ($5.25) – This week’s variety is Harvest Moon, a rich, yellow-fleshed potato with purple skin. Store in a cool, dry place & don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.
  • Kohlrabi ($1.50) – Remove skin with a knife or peeler. You can add thin slices or grated kohlrabi to salads, or cut spears to dip into hummus. Kohlrabi is also a great addition to coleslaws.
  • Black Kale ($3.00) – Remove stems, slice leaves thinly and sauté with garlic and onion. Top with fried eggs for a quick, delicious, and hearty breakfast.
  • 1 Sweet Onion ($1.50) – The high sugar content in these onions makes them perfect for caramelizing.
  • 2 Cucumbers ($3.00) – Eat fresh like an apple or slice into salads for a nice, sweet crunch.
  • 1 bunch Pearl Onion ($2.50) – These are delicious roasted or grilled and eaten whole.
  • 2 heads Lettuce ($4.00)
  • 1 pint Strawberries ($4.00)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $29.25

Recipes

 Roasted Potatoes & Pearl Onions

Our Eclipse pearl onions are incredibly sweet! Your CSA Coordinator Will loves them so much that he’s even been eating them raw at lunch lately. If you’re not quite that hardcore (he might be the only one) then one of the best ways to maximize their sweetness is to roast them. Mixed up with purple potatoes they will be both beautiful and delicious. There’s nothing quite like that first bite of warm, creamy, sweet onion, mixed with crispy, savory potatoes.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 pounds new potatoes
  • 1 bunch pearl onions, peeled
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons dried rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a large bowl, toss together all ingredients. Spread the mixture in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake until the potatoes and onions are golden brown and cooked through, about 40 minutes. Serve immediately or cool and store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, reheating the next day in a preheated 400 degrees F oven for 10 to 15 minutes.

Adapted from http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/potatoes-and-onions-recipe-1916966

Spring Couscous Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 1 cup uncooked couscous
  • 1 head lettuce, sliced thinly
  • 1 medium cucumber, halved and sliced
  • 1 kohlrabi, peeled and grated
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 3 tablespoons minced fresh basil
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepperDirections
  1. In a small saucepan, bring broth to a boil. Stir in couscous. Remove from the heat; cover and let stand for 5-10 minutes or until water is absorbed. Fluff with a fork and set aside to cool slightly.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cucumber, kohlrabi, cheese, onion and basil. Stir in couscous.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk the oil, lemon juice and seasonings. Pour over couscous mixture; toss to coat. Add more of anything to taste. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Adapted from http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/summer-garden-couscous-salad

My Favorite Breakfast

 Ingredients

  • ¼ Sweet Onion, chopped
  • 1 head Fresh Garlic, minced
  • 1 bu. Black Kale, thinly sliced
  • 2 eggs
  • Salt & cooking oil of choice
  • Your hot sauce of choice

Directions

Chop everything up, heat up some oil in a frying pan, and start onions on their own first. After a couple minutes, add in the garlic, and after another couple minutes add in the kale. Toss around for a minute or so to wilt the kale sufficiently, sprinkle with salt and plate.

In the same pan, fry up a couple eggs however you like them. When done, place on top of your garlic & greens sauté and finish with a drizzle of hot sauce. This is such an easy breakfast to make you guys!

Adapted from: my mind…

2016 CSA: Thank You, Thank You

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CSA Newsletter – Week 21


Thank You, Thank You

Throughout the year, there are certain events that are indicators that remind us of the changing seasons. The end of the CSA is certainly one of them. It marks the beginning of the season winding down. In a month, many markets will be ending and things will start to get a little quieter around the farm. Then, before you know it, we start the cycle all over again!

We hope that you have enjoyed your CSA experience this year. We certainly appreciate your support! While we do have diversified sales avenues, the CSA remains a vital part of our farm model. Your support in the early months of the year when we are working hard to prepare for the growing season is very integral to our success. As an individual, your contribution may seem small but when there are 330 shares, that amounts to a lot of support!

On our end, we do our best to give you a taste of our seasonal offerings and to share the bounty of our harvest. Our way of saying thank you for investing in our farm is by loading you up with veggies throughout the season. This year, the market value of your CSA veggies was about 35% over what you paid for your share.

Thank you for your support and we hope that you’ll join us again!

 

Table of Box Contents

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Butternut Squash ($3.00) – Butternut squash is incredibly versatile and delicious. The skin is thin enough that you can eat cooled or peal it easily before cooking. Roast it, use it for pie, add it to soup, the possibilities are endless!

☐  1 Pie Pumpkin ($4.00) – This pumpkin is cute to look at and is tatsy to eat too. Roast it and make a pie, or use it in soup or curry. If you have leftovers when you cook it, freeze for later use this winter.

☐  White Kale ($3.00)

  1 Celeriac ($2.50) – You are now acquainted with this gnarly fall veggie. Roast it, mash it, add it to soup. Try the Root Ribbons with Sage recipe.

☐  Bulk Carrots ($2.00)

☐  2 Parsnips ($2.00) – Parsnips are deliciously sweet when sautéed or roasted. Use them to make home fries, pureed soup, or mashed.

☐  Parsley ($2.00) – Parsley is a great addition or garnish to almost any dish. Add it to salad, soups, pesto, or salad dressings. Not going to use it all? Dry it for later use!

☐  1 Shallot ($1.50)

  2 Storage Onions ($1.50) – These onions are not as sweet raw but are delicious when cooked and they can last a very long time when stored in a dry, dark area.

Box Market Value: $25.00

 

Recipes

Butternut Squash and Kale Torte

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • ½ small butternut squash (about 1 lb)
  • 1 medium red onion
  • 1 small bunch kale
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • 1 medium Yukon gold potato (about 6 oz)
  • 6 oz. thinly sliced provolone cheese (from the deli counter)
  • 1 plum tomato
  • ¼ c. grated Parmesan (1 oz)

Preparation

Heat oven to 425°F. Oil a 9-in. springform pan. Arrange half the butternut squash in the bottom of the pan, in concentric circles. Top with half the onion, separating the rings. Top with half the kale, drizzle with half the oil and season with 1/4 tsp salt. Top with the potatoes and half the provolone cheese.

Top with remaining kale, drizzle with the remaining oil and season with 1/4 tsp each salt and pepper. Top with the remaining onion, tomatoes and provolone. Arrange the remaining squash on top and sprinkle with the Parmesan.

Jerry Traunfeld’s Root Ribbons with Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds medium root vegetables, such as carrots, parsnips, celeriac, rutabagas, turnips, parsley root, or salsify (avoid beets)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped sage
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

 Preparation

Wash and peel the roots and discard the peelings. Continue to peel the vegetables from their tops to the root tips to produce ribbons, rotating the roots on their axis a quarter turn after each strip is peeled, until you’re left with cores that are too small to work with. (You can snack on these or save them for stock.) Alternately, you may use a mandoline.

Melt the butter with the sage in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir for a minute to partially cook the sage. Add the root ribbons and toss them with tongs until they begin to wilt. Add the salt, a good grinding of black pepper, the maple syrup, lemon juice, and about 3/4 cup of water.

 

Butternut Squash Fries

As you probably know by now, I believe that anything is more delicious in fry form. Squash is now exception. Try making parsnip fries too. For a great dipping sauce, make herbed aioli with your fresh herbs.

 Ingredients

  • 1 butternut squash
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • sea salt to garnish

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 400° F. Peel and cut the squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds and then cut each half into fries or wedges.

Toss the fries in oil and then place in a single layer onto a baking tray. Bake for 20-35 minutes (depending on the size of your fries) turning once.

Remove from the oven and sprinkle with sea salt.

2016 CSA – Week 20: From the Field to the Fridge

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CSA Newsletter – Week 20


From the Field to the Fridge

I have the pleasure of hosting a pickup each week in Corvallis. It is there that I get to see the fruits of our labor enjoyed by CSA members, their children, and even a few dogs! Last week, I was chatting with a member about how many vegetables are groomed during harvest or during packing on the farm. For some vegetables, there is quite a transformation from the field to your fridge.

Anything with a twist tie has been bunched in the field. That means that several plants, leaves, or stems are gathered together, sometimes from multiple plants or stalks, to make a bunch. Bunches must be uniform and consistent, it is certainly a skill. Bunches are comprised of the best vegetation from a planting, so no matter how the planting looks in the fields, the bunches will always look great!

Root crops such as beets, turnips, or rutabagas are trimmed in the field. The greens are left in the field along with any roots that are clearly not marketable. The resulting harvest is brought into the barn for washing and further grading.

In the barn, cabbages are peeled down to layers without holes or blemishes. Onions are peeled to check for quality. Leeks and scallions tops are trimmed or chopped.

All of this selection allows us to bring you the best of what we have to offer. Enjoy!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Crown Prince Squash ($6.50) – This beautiful blue squash is a great keeper and has dense, sweet orange flesh. Roast it and use it for pie, soup, or eat it as is.

☐  1 Black Radish ($1.00) – This striking radish is very versatile. It is a bit denser than a salad radish but can certainly be eaten fresh when sliced thin. Try adding it to gratins or roasting it, see recipe.

☐  1 Watermelon Radish ($1.00) – These radishes are a welcomed burst of color in the fall. Slice into the green and white radish to reveal a vibrant pink interior. Add some color to any salad, soup, or veggie roast.

  1 Cabbage ($6.25) – This cabbage will keep for several weeks (or longer) in your fridge and can become an ingredient in many meals. Try it stir-fried, in soups, salads, or stuffed.

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Swiss Chard ($3.00)

  1 Red Onion ($0.75)

☐  2 Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. They are delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $30.00

 

Recipes

Pumpkin Pie

 For the Crust

  • 3 cups raw pecans
  • 6 tbsp. light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 12 tsp. kosher salt
  • 6 tbsp. butter, cubed

For the Filling

  • 1 ¾ Cup roasted squash
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup 2% milk

Preheat oven to 350° with rack in the middle position. Pulse pecans, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in food processor until coarsely chopped. Add butter and pulse until mixture is finely ground and holds together like damp sand. Press most of the pecan mixture into deep dish 9″ pie plate, Bake 8–10 minutes until lightly colored and fragrant. Set aside until ready to fill.

In large bowl, combine the squash, eggs, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves; beat until smooth. (I like to use a food processor)  Gradually beat in milk. Pour into crust.

Bake at 350° for  50-60 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cover edges with foil during the last 30 minutes to prevent over-browning if necessary. Cool on a wire rack. Refrigerate leftovers.

Read More: Saveur for crust and TasteofHome for filling.

 

Roasted Radishes

Radishes are delicious raw in salads but they are also delicious cooked or roasted. Cooking tones down the spiciness so if you aren’t’ a fan of raw radishes, try them cooked!

Ingredients

  • 3 large watermelon radishes, peeled
  • 1 Black radish, peeled
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

Chèvre Horseradish Dressing

  • Fresh horseradish
  • Zest from 1/2 of a lemon
  • 1 ½ tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ cup chèvre
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400º.  Cover a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil, coat lightly with oil.

Cut radishes into 1/2-inch thick, even pieces. Toss radish pieces with olive oil, salt, and pepper in a large bowl to coat evenly. Distribute the radish pieces in an even layer on the baking sheet.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring after 15 minutes. Radishes should have some browning, and retain some firmness when they are done.

While radishes are roasting, grate about 2 to 3 packed tablespoons’ worth of fresh horseradish. Thoroughly combine 1 ½  tbsp of the grated horseradish with the lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, chèvre, and 1/8 tsp salt.

Once radishes have finished roasting, transfer them to the bowl with the dressing. Toss to coat. Taste and add salt if needed. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Read More: Food52

 

Kimchi-Style Sautéed Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 2 scallions, cut into ½” pieces, plus more, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 1” piece peeled ginger, chopped
  • 2 tbsp gochujang
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ½ head green cabbage, cut into 1” strips
  • Kosher salt

Preparation

Purée scallions, garlic, ginger, gochujang, fish sauce, and rice vinegar in a blender. Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Cook cabbage, tossing often, until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add scallion mixture and sliced scallions; season with salt.

Read More: BonAppetit