2017 CSA – Week 1: Greetings from Your Farmers

CSA Newsletter – Week 1


Greetings from Your Farmers

Welcome to our 20th CSA season, everyone! This year also happens to be our 30th year growing vegetables in the Willamette Valley, and it is an honor to continue providing quality produce to our community. Your contribution as a CSA member provided a much needed kick start to our off-season allowing us to do things such as purchase seed and prep ground. As many of you may know, it’s been a particularly rough winter and spring for farming with all the rain we’ve had, so we appreciate your support that much more. The next 21 weeks of vegetables is our way of saying thank you.

This year we have a new system for CSA where rather than having one coordinator who does everything, we have a small crew of people devoted to bringing you your box. Marina, who has been a part of our farming family her whole life, will be managing box packing and produce selection. Will, who you’ve all been communicating with already, is new to the farm this year and is the official CSA Coordinator. And I am the Farmers’ Market Coordinator and self-proclaimed Vegecator, ready to spread the love of vegetables with you all through this newsletter. I invite you all to view your CSA box not just as a box full of fresh, organic produce at a discounted rate, but also as an educational opportunity to learn about where your food comes from and easy ways to enjoy it. It’s going to be a journey through the seasons!

The CSA Newsletter is a way for me to share a little bit about the contents of each box, let you in on what’s going on at the farm, and share ideas about ways to prepare your weekly supply of veggies in a feasibly delicious way. We would also love to hear from you! Share your favorite recipes or preparation methods, pictures, or questions. If you are social media savvy, you can find us on Facebook and Instagram at @gatheringtogetherfarm and hashtag your pictures and comments with #gtfcsa so that we can find you! I will be sure to share tips, and recipes in future newsletters.

Thanks again for all your support. It’s going to be a delicious year!

– Laura Bennett
markets@gatheringtogetherfarm.com

Table of Box Contents

  • 1 bunch Basil ($3.00)
  • Fresh Garlic ($1.50) – Enjoy the savory wonder of garlic without having to peel it! It’s a game changer, folks.
  • 5 lbs New Potatoes ($5.25) – This week’s variety is Harvest Moon, a rich, yellow-fleshed potato with purple skin. Store in a cool, dry place & don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.
  • Kohlrabi ($1.50) – Remove skin with a knife or peeler. You can add thin slices or grated kohlrabi to salads, or cut spears to dip into hummus. Kohlrabi is also a great addition to coleslaws.
  • Black Kale ($3.00) – Remove stems, slice leaves thinly and sauté with garlic and onion. Top with fried eggs for a quick, delicious, and hearty breakfast.
  • 1 Sweet Onion ($1.50) – The high sugar content in these onions makes them perfect for caramelizing.
  • 2 Cucumbers ($3.00) – Eat fresh like an apple or slice into salads for a nice, sweet crunch.
  • 1 bunch Pearl Onion ($2.50) – These are delicious roasted or grilled and eaten whole.
  • 2 heads Lettuce ($4.00)
  • 1 pint Strawberries ($4.00)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $29.25

Recipes

 Roasted Potatoes & Pearl Onions

Our Eclipse pearl onions are incredibly sweet! Your CSA Coordinator Will loves them so much that he’s even been eating them raw at lunch lately. If you’re not quite that hardcore (he might be the only one) then one of the best ways to maximize their sweetness is to roast them. Mixed up with purple potatoes they will be both beautiful and delicious. There’s nothing quite like that first bite of warm, creamy, sweet onion, mixed with crispy, savory potatoes.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 pounds new potatoes
  • 1 bunch pearl onions, peeled
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons dried rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a large bowl, toss together all ingredients. Spread the mixture in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake until the potatoes and onions are golden brown and cooked through, about 40 minutes. Serve immediately or cool and store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, reheating the next day in a preheated 400 degrees F oven for 10 to 15 minutes.

Adapted from http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/potatoes-and-onions-recipe-1916966

Spring Couscous Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 1 cup uncooked couscous
  • 1 head lettuce, sliced thinly
  • 1 medium cucumber, halved and sliced
  • 1 kohlrabi, peeled and grated
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 3 tablespoons minced fresh basil
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepperDirections
  1. In a small saucepan, bring broth to a boil. Stir in couscous. Remove from the heat; cover and let stand for 5-10 minutes or until water is absorbed. Fluff with a fork and set aside to cool slightly.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cucumber, kohlrabi, cheese, onion and basil. Stir in couscous.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk the oil, lemon juice and seasonings. Pour over couscous mixture; toss to coat. Add more of anything to taste. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Adapted from http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/summer-garden-couscous-salad

My Favorite Breakfast

 Ingredients

  • ¼ Sweet Onion, chopped
  • 1 head Fresh Garlic, minced
  • 1 bu. Black Kale, thinly sliced
  • 2 eggs
  • Salt & cooking oil of choice
  • Your hot sauce of choice

Directions

Chop everything up, heat up some oil in a frying pan, and start onions on their own first. After a couple minutes, add in the garlic, and after another couple minutes add in the kale. Toss around for a minute or so to wilt the kale sufficiently, sprinkle with salt and plate.

In the same pan, fry up a couple eggs however you like them. When done, place on top of your garlic & greens sauté and finish with a drizzle of hot sauce. This is such an easy breakfast to make you guys!

Adapted from: my mind…

2016 CSA: Thank You, Thank You

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CSA Newsletter – Week 21


Thank You, Thank You

Throughout the year, there are certain events that are indicators that remind us of the changing seasons. The end of the CSA is certainly one of them. It marks the beginning of the season winding down. In a month, many markets will be ending and things will start to get a little quieter around the farm. Then, before you know it, we start the cycle all over again!

We hope that you have enjoyed your CSA experience this year. We certainly appreciate your support! While we do have diversified sales avenues, the CSA remains a vital part of our farm model. Your support in the early months of the year when we are working hard to prepare for the growing season is very integral to our success. As an individual, your contribution may seem small but when there are 330 shares, that amounts to a lot of support!

On our end, we do our best to give you a taste of our seasonal offerings and to share the bounty of our harvest. Our way of saying thank you for investing in our farm is by loading you up with veggies throughout the season. This year, the market value of your CSA veggies was about 35% over what you paid for your share.

Thank you for your support and we hope that you’ll join us again!

 

Table of Box Contents

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Butternut Squash ($3.00) – Butternut squash is incredibly versatile and delicious. The skin is thin enough that you can eat cooled or peal it easily before cooking. Roast it, use it for pie, add it to soup, the possibilities are endless!

☐  1 Pie Pumpkin ($4.00) – This pumpkin is cute to look at and is tatsy to eat too. Roast it and make a pie, or use it in soup or curry. If you have leftovers when you cook it, freeze for later use this winter.

☐  White Kale ($3.00)

  1 Celeriac ($2.50) – You are now acquainted with this gnarly fall veggie. Roast it, mash it, add it to soup. Try the Root Ribbons with Sage recipe.

☐  Bulk Carrots ($2.00)

☐  2 Parsnips ($2.00) – Parsnips are deliciously sweet when sautéed or roasted. Use them to make home fries, pureed soup, or mashed.

☐  Parsley ($2.00) – Parsley is a great addition or garnish to almost any dish. Add it to salad, soups, pesto, or salad dressings. Not going to use it all? Dry it for later use!

☐  1 Shallot ($1.50)

  2 Storage Onions ($1.50) – These onions are not as sweet raw but are delicious when cooked and they can last a very long time when stored in a dry, dark area.

Box Market Value: $25.00

 

Recipes

Butternut Squash and Kale Torte

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • ½ small butternut squash (about 1 lb)
  • 1 medium red onion
  • 1 small bunch kale
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • 1 medium Yukon gold potato (about 6 oz)
  • 6 oz. thinly sliced provolone cheese (from the deli counter)
  • 1 plum tomato
  • ¼ c. grated Parmesan (1 oz)

Preparation

Heat oven to 425°F. Oil a 9-in. springform pan. Arrange half the butternut squash in the bottom of the pan, in concentric circles. Top with half the onion, separating the rings. Top with half the kale, drizzle with half the oil and season with 1/4 tsp salt. Top with the potatoes and half the provolone cheese.

Top with remaining kale, drizzle with the remaining oil and season with 1/4 tsp each salt and pepper. Top with the remaining onion, tomatoes and provolone. Arrange the remaining squash on top and sprinkle with the Parmesan.

Jerry Traunfeld’s Root Ribbons with Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds medium root vegetables, such as carrots, parsnips, celeriac, rutabagas, turnips, parsley root, or salsify (avoid beets)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped sage
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

 Preparation

Wash and peel the roots and discard the peelings. Continue to peel the vegetables from their tops to the root tips to produce ribbons, rotating the roots on their axis a quarter turn after each strip is peeled, until you’re left with cores that are too small to work with. (You can snack on these or save them for stock.) Alternately, you may use a mandoline.

Melt the butter with the sage in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir for a minute to partially cook the sage. Add the root ribbons and toss them with tongs until they begin to wilt. Add the salt, a good grinding of black pepper, the maple syrup, lemon juice, and about 3/4 cup of water.

 

Butternut Squash Fries

As you probably know by now, I believe that anything is more delicious in fry form. Squash is now exception. Try making parsnip fries too. For a great dipping sauce, make herbed aioli with your fresh herbs.

 Ingredients

  • 1 butternut squash
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • sea salt to garnish

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 400° F. Peel and cut the squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds and then cut each half into fries or wedges.

Toss the fries in oil and then place in a single layer onto a baking tray. Bake for 20-35 minutes (depending on the size of your fries) turning once.

Remove from the oven and sprinkle with sea salt.

2016 CSA – Week 20: From the Field to the Fridge

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CSA Newsletter – Week 20


From the Field to the Fridge

I have the pleasure of hosting a pickup each week in Corvallis. It is there that I get to see the fruits of our labor enjoyed by CSA members, their children, and even a few dogs! Last week, I was chatting with a member about how many vegetables are groomed during harvest or during packing on the farm. For some vegetables, there is quite a transformation from the field to your fridge.

Anything with a twist tie has been bunched in the field. That means that several plants, leaves, or stems are gathered together, sometimes from multiple plants or stalks, to make a bunch. Bunches must be uniform and consistent, it is certainly a skill. Bunches are comprised of the best vegetation from a planting, so no matter how the planting looks in the fields, the bunches will always look great!

Root crops such as beets, turnips, or rutabagas are trimmed in the field. The greens are left in the field along with any roots that are clearly not marketable. The resulting harvest is brought into the barn for washing and further grading.

In the barn, cabbages are peeled down to layers without holes or blemishes. Onions are peeled to check for quality. Leeks and scallions tops are trimmed or chopped.

All of this selection allows us to bring you the best of what we have to offer. Enjoy!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Crown Prince Squash ($6.50) – This beautiful blue squash is a great keeper and has dense, sweet orange flesh. Roast it and use it for pie, soup, or eat it as is.

☐  1 Black Radish ($1.00) – This striking radish is very versatile. It is a bit denser than a salad radish but can certainly be eaten fresh when sliced thin. Try adding it to gratins or roasting it, see recipe.

☐  1 Watermelon Radish ($1.00) – These radishes are a welcomed burst of color in the fall. Slice into the green and white radish to reveal a vibrant pink interior. Add some color to any salad, soup, or veggie roast.

  1 Cabbage ($6.25) – This cabbage will keep for several weeks (or longer) in your fridge and can become an ingredient in many meals. Try it stir-fried, in soups, salads, or stuffed.

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Swiss Chard ($3.00)

  1 Red Onion ($0.75)

☐  2 Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. They are delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $30.00

 

Recipes

Pumpkin Pie

 For the Crust

  • 3 cups raw pecans
  • 6 tbsp. light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 12 tsp. kosher salt
  • 6 tbsp. butter, cubed

For the Filling

  • 1 ¾ Cup roasted squash
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup 2% milk

Preheat oven to 350° with rack in the middle position. Pulse pecans, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in food processor until coarsely chopped. Add butter and pulse until mixture is finely ground and holds together like damp sand. Press most of the pecan mixture into deep dish 9″ pie plate, Bake 8–10 minutes until lightly colored and fragrant. Set aside until ready to fill.

In large bowl, combine the squash, eggs, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves; beat until smooth. (I like to use a food processor)  Gradually beat in milk. Pour into crust.

Bake at 350° for  50-60 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cover edges with foil during the last 30 minutes to prevent over-browning if necessary. Cool on a wire rack. Refrigerate leftovers.

Read More: Saveur for crust and TasteofHome for filling.

 

Roasted Radishes

Radishes are delicious raw in salads but they are also delicious cooked or roasted. Cooking tones down the spiciness so if you aren’t’ a fan of raw radishes, try them cooked!

Ingredients

  • 3 large watermelon radishes, peeled
  • 1 Black radish, peeled
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

Chèvre Horseradish Dressing

  • Fresh horseradish
  • Zest from 1/2 of a lemon
  • 1 ½ tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ cup chèvre
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400º.  Cover a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil, coat lightly with oil.

Cut radishes into 1/2-inch thick, even pieces. Toss radish pieces with olive oil, salt, and pepper in a large bowl to coat evenly. Distribute the radish pieces in an even layer on the baking sheet.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring after 15 minutes. Radishes should have some browning, and retain some firmness when they are done.

While radishes are roasting, grate about 2 to 3 packed tablespoons’ worth of fresh horseradish. Thoroughly combine 1 ½  tbsp of the grated horseradish with the lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, chèvre, and 1/8 tsp salt.

Once radishes have finished roasting, transfer them to the bowl with the dressing. Toss to coat. Taste and add salt if needed. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Read More: Food52

 

Kimchi-Style Sautéed Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 2 scallions, cut into ½” pieces, plus more, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 1” piece peeled ginger, chopped
  • 2 tbsp gochujang
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ½ head green cabbage, cut into 1” strips
  • Kosher salt

Preparation

Purée scallions, garlic, ginger, gochujang, fish sauce, and rice vinegar in a blender. Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Cook cabbage, tossing often, until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add scallion mixture and sliced scallions; season with salt.

Read More: BonAppetit

 

2016 CSA – Week 19: River Watch

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CSA Newsletter – Week 19


River Watch Season

As it turns out, we didn’t quite get the storm that we were all anticipating last weekend. However, judging by the satellite imagery and the weather forecast, it looked like we were in for a doozy. After much debate and consideration, we pulled out of all Saturday markets, only attending one out of our typical five weekend markets. If the weather system had landed, it would have been a much different weekend. Nevertheless, we did get a lot of rain, even for Oregon standards.

Last Wednesday, all of the irrigation pumps and pipes were pulled out of the river. During the summer months, the fields are irrigated with river water when there is little rain and the river is low. If we don’t remove the pumps and pipes before the water level rises, they may get washed down the river!

The water level of the Mary’s River, which snakes through the farm, rose a total of 12 feet from 3 feet on Wednesday to 15 feet on Monday morning. And so the season of river watching begins. If the river gets too high, it will spill over into fields and, in a major flood, into our packing area.  It certainly helps to be prepared when high water level is expected so we’ll all be keeping an eye on the river from now on!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Huckleberry Gold Potatoes ($3.00) – Beautiful purple potatoes with yellow flesh that is creamy and buttery. Great as mashed potatoes, roasted, or baked.

☐  2 Delicata Squash ($3.00) – This petite squash so tasty any way you cook it. The skin is tender when cooked; there is no need to peel it. To roast, slice it in half, remove the seeds, and bake face down until tender. You can also sauté or stuff delicata.

☐  Purple Top Turnips ($2.00) – Turnips are surprisingly versatile, delicious root vegetable. You can roast them, mash them, or bake them. They are delicious in soups or on their own.

☐  2 Leeks ($3.25) – Leeks are another versatile vegetable what are delicious sautéed, roasted, and in soups. I even put them on nachos!

  Collard Greens ($3.00) – Collards are a hearty green, similar to kale. Collards are wonderful sautéed with garlic, in soup, or used as a wrap when blanched!

☐  1 Colored Pepper ($2.00)

☐  1 Green Bell Pepper ($1.00)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Celery ($2.50) – This vegetable is bit of a treat on our farm! Celery is wonderful in just about everything from tuna salad, to stuffing, to soup.

☐  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. It is delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $27.00

 

Recipes

Sage & Nut-Stuffed Delicata Squash

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ tsp sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp fresh sage, chopped
  • 1/3 cup lightly toasted pine nuts, chopped
  • 1/3 cup lightly toasted almonds, chopped
  • ½ cup cooked short-grain brown rice or quinoa (I usually cook the rice in vegetable broth for added flavor)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 2 delicata squash, halved lengthwise and seeded

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350° F. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add onions, garlic, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft, about 3 minutes. Stir in sage and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in nuts. Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the rice, eggs, Parmesan, and half of the cheddar cheese. Stir in the nut and onion mixture. Divide the stuffing among the squash halves, sprinkle with the rest of the cheddar cheese, and bake until tender when pierced with a fork and tops are browning, about 45 minutes.

Read More: Food52

 

Soup Basics

Soup is surprisingly easy to make and is a great way to use your vegetables. The variations are endless and you can make it as simple or as sophisticated as you like!

 To start (use what you have):

  1. Sauté: chopped onions, leeks, and/or shallots
  2. When browned, add cubed veggies such as squash, potatoes, turnips, celeriac, celery, and carrots
  3. Add water or stock to cover veggies. (You can also add soup bones or chicken feet for added flavor) Add fresh or dried herbs such as sage, thyme, parsley, oregano etc. Simmer until fragrant, at least one hour.
  4. Add chopped greens a five minutes before the soup is done. This prevents overcooking.

Enjoy!

 

Collard Greens Wraps

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil while you carefully stem the collard greens, trying to keep the leaves intact.
  2. Fill a bowl with ice water.
  3. When the water comes to a boil, salt generously and add the collard leaves in batches.
  4. Blanch two minutes and transfer to the ice water. Drain, gently squeeze out excess water and set aside.
  5. Use in place of a tortilla and add beans and rice or make up your own filling.

Read More: NYT Cooking

2016 CSA – Week 18: After the Harvest

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CSA Newsletter – Week 18


After the Harvest

I said my goodbyes to a house of heirloom tomatoes as I helped clear it out for the next planting. It is another reminder of the changing seasons and another reminder that a farmer’s work is never done!

When we harvest many of our crops, such as beets, turnips, potatoes, more often than not, the whole plant is harvested and the field is pretty much cleared and ready to be turned over to the next crop in the rotation. Sometimes, we add an amendment or two and then we turn over the soil and prep it to receive the next planting.

However, some crops require more work before the ground is ready for the next planting. Crops such as tomatoes, eggplant, and cucumbers that are harvested continuously often require trellising infrastructure. Once the crop is done producing, the plant matter, up to 10 ft. tall, must be uprooted and hauled away. This can be a messy job as there are inevitably some rotting vegetables in the houses as well. The trellising setup must be dis-assembled and any drip irrigation must be removed. Only then can the soil be prepared for the next planting.

It’s a lot of work but I think that we can agree that the delicious results are worth the extra effort!

 

Table of Box Contents

☐  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Huckleberry Gold Potatoes ($3.00) – Beautiful purple potatoes with yellow flesh that is creamy and buttery. Great as mashed potatoes, roasted, or baked.

☐  Scarlet Kabocha Squash ($4.50)

☐  1 lb Sunchokes ($4.00) – These knobby tubers caramelize beautifully when roasted. See recipe.

☐  Bok Choy ($3.00) – This beautiful, Asian vegetable is delicious in stir-fries and soups.

☐  2 Colored Peppers ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Colored Carrots ($3.50)- This bunch of carrots not only beautiful but they are just as delicious as they look!

   Romanesco ($6.25) – This fractal vegetable is beautiful and delicious! It is in the brassica family and is related to broccoli and cauliflower. Blanch it in boiling water and then shock it under cold water or in an ice bath. Us it in stir-fries, salads, or grill it!

☐  1 Dried Sweet Onion ($0.75)- Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. It is delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

  1 Dried Red Onion ($0.75)

☐  3 Roma Tomatoes ($3.00) – These tomatoes are great for sauce, soups, or roasting. They have firm flesh and are less juicy which lends itself to cooking but they are also delicious in salsa. If you want to save them for soups or sauces for winter, you can freeze the tomatoes whole.

 Box Market Value: $32.00

 

Recipes

Creamy Kabocha Squash Polenta

 I tend to roast squash and eat with a little butter and salt, but if you wanted to incorporate it in a dish, polenta is a perfect base.

 Ingredients

  • 1 Kabocha Squash
  • ½ cup cream
  • 2 cups polenta
  • 2 oz parmesan, grated
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  1. Remove stem from squash. Halve, scoop seeds, and bake face down in 1/2″ water at 400 F until tender, 20-30 minutes. Allow to sit for about 10 minutes. Scoop flesh into bowl with an immersion blender or blender. Add the cream and blend to get a thick and very smooth purée. Season with salt.
  2. Bring 3 cups water to a boil with 1 t salt. Stir in polenta and stir until your arm wants to fall off – about 30 minutes. Try to stir as much as possible as it makes it creamier. At around the 20-minute mark, stir in the kabocha and cheese. Season with nutmeg and white pepper and salt to taste.

Read More: Food52

 

Roasted Sunchokes

This knobby tuber caramelizes wonderfully when roasted.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Sunchokes, scrubbed
  • ½ tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chopped Italian or curled parsley (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees
  2. Scrub the Sunchokes with a potato brush and chop into 1 inch bite-size chunks
  3. Toss in a medium sized bowl with olive oil, salt and pepper until coated
  4. Place onto a baking sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes, turning once, until the skin is slightly browned
  5. Sprinkle with fresh parsley. Serve plain or with a side of ketchup.

Read More: OliveandHerb

 

Sautéed Romanesco with Garlic

Any fresh vegetable sautéed is bound to be delicious. I find that with most things, getting them a little color or even char greatly enhances their flavor and texture. In addition to sautéed garlic, try incorporating caramelized onions or shallots into this recipe.

Ingredients

  •  1 head of Broccoli Romanesco, cut into bite size pieces
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 1 good pinch of salt
  • 2 cloves of garlic, pressed and mixed with 1 tbs water
  • Parmesan or Romano cheese to taste

  Directions

  1. Bring some well-salted water to a boil.
  2. Cook the Romanesco pieces until just tender, about 3 or 4 minutes
  3. Drain the broccoli pieces and run under cold water until they are cool.
  4. Heat the oil in a pan until it is a hot and begins to shimmer
  5. Add the garlic and for 30 seconds. It should start to smell good and garlicky.
  6. Now add the Romanesco and a pinch of salt and sauté for 2-3 minutes.
  7. Grate cheese over warm Romanesco and enjoy!