Lunch Menu: Week of Oct. 24, 2017

Seared duck breast on celery root puree with kale, curried apples and maple

Antipasti

GTF kimchee    4

chad fell’s bread & olives    5

emily’s farm fresh pickle plate    4

duck liver mousse on fresh baguette, with arugula and balsamic reduction    4

hearty winter vegetable soup with lentils, barley and chicken sausage, served with bread     5

spicy vegetarian chili, topped with goat cheese, served with bread    5

mixed greens with balsamic    6.5

GTF salad – goat cheese, pumpkin seeds, carrots, and a honey-lavender vinaigrette     9.5

 

Pizze Rosse

garlic / basil    13

bacon / kale   13

corn / leek / potato   13

 

 

 Pizze Bianche

kalamata / goat cheese  13

roasted pepper / caramelised onion  13

ham / bleu  13

 

 

add an egg, pickled jalapenos, or anchovies   1

 

Secondi

mushroom ravioli with roasted butternut, delicata, celeriac, carrots and onions   13

duck leg confit on sweet corn grits with collard greens and broccolini   14

rack of lamb on barley and lentils with romanesco and romesco    14

brodetto of prawns and clams with, fingerling potatoes and romas topped with aioli    14

seared duck breast on celery root puree with kale, curried apples and maple   14

 

CSA 2017 – Week 20: Remembering Hannah McGuire

CSA Newsletter – Week 20


Remembering Hannah McGuire

It is with deep communal sadness that we send out this newsletter. Hannah McGuire, former CSA Coordinator who many of you may have known, has passed away. Hannah was a large part of creating Gathering Together as we know it today. She worked at the farm for eleven years starting as a server in the Farmstand, then worked in the packing shed, became a CSA Coordinator, and then delivered bread and pastries to the Corvallis Market. We lost Hannah suddenly and unexpectedly; at 28 years old, she was swimming in the Rogue River on Saturday, August 26th and very unfortunately the river carried her away. Anyone who knew Hannah would say she was one of the most special people they’d ever met, and the whole farm has been devastated with this loss.

Almost two months later, it is still hard to believe that Hannah is gone. Hannah wasn’t just an employee, she was the best CSA Coordinator there ever was, but beyond that she was an integral part of the GTF family. She is someone who inspired a lot of us to be better people because she was always so kind and thoughtful. Hannah went beyond the call of duty as a CSA Coordinator, she would pre-write a lot of her newsletters and often times would try recipes out before giving them out to members. Hannah wanted it to be perfect, or pretty close to perfect, for CSA members. However, what stands out the most by far were her people skills. When there were complaints or upset CSA members she never became upset or angry, never got stressed. She was forever calm, and always responded with a kind and diplomatic attitude.

It is in tough times like these that we feel the deep importance of our farm community. Shortly after she passed, all of us who work at the farm and knew Hannah came together to share in our favorite stories of her. It was such a mournful yet beautiful human experience to be a part of. This farm is much more than just a work place; it is a family, and we all truly care for one another. We cannot express the gratitude that we feel for the time that Hannah was with us at GTF. She touched each one of us with her uniquely gentle and positive energy. She was loved by all (our cat, Romana, and dog, Maggie included). This winter we plan to build a small meditation hut in the back field that will be dedicated to her. There will always be a need for us at GTF to keep our connection to our beloved Hannah. And now we will leave you with a quote from one of Hannah’s many beautiful newsletters.

Sincerely—John Eveland, Sally Brewer, Haylee Eveland, and Laura Bennett

“Last year, a singing group made up mostly of farm employees and farm friends met once every week in our GTF Farmstand. One of the songs they sang was a Native American prayer song with a haunting melody:

Now I walk in beauty / Beauty is before me. Beauty is behind me / Above and below me.

One early morning when we were harvesting your lettuce, the clouds were layered in waves against a backdrop of pink, blue and gold and it brought this song to mind. Farming is a job many people don’t seem to want, probably because it brings to mind sweating under the sun with a painful back and only a few pennies to show for it. While there may be some truth in that image, there is also a great deal of happiness in farming. We spend most of our days outside in the fresh air, surrounded by calm beauty. It’s normal for us to start our day alongside the sunrise and the singing birds, and when treats like that become the norm, it’s easy for us to stop noticing them. Our minds buzz with the chaos of keeping numbers straight and produce organized in a business with so many different operations that sometimes we feel positively silly. But when we take a step back and look at where we are in a more objective way, we realize that we truly live and work in a place of exquisite beauty.

Have a beautiful day!” -Hannah McGuire

Table of Box Contents

  • Scarlet Kabocha Squash— This squash will blow your mind! It’s basically a giant roasted chestnut, with a deeply savory and nutty flavor and a creamy yet dry texture. At the market, you’ll see a variety of green, scarlet, and grey kabochas, each with their own slight flavor variations.
  • Arugulaa delicate yet spicy green, perfect for making into salads with fruit, nuts, and cheese.
  • Savoy Cabbage— When something is described as being “savoy” it means that the leaves are densely wrinkled rather than being smooth. This adds a beautiful texture to any dish that you create.
  • Scallions
  • Bunched Red Beets
  • Jalapeño— In October? You bet! Enjoy this last remaining bundle of heat from summer.
  • Shallot— Shallots are a cross between onions and garlic, which is why they often look like they’re trying to clove up a bit. Their flavor is also much more potent than a normal onion, you may need to tag out with a friend if you’re chopping for too long.
  • Huckleberry Gold Potatoes— These potatoes are the most beautiful of the season so far. Their skin is dark purple with hints of magenta, and their flesh is a creamy golden yellow.
  • Fennel—The bulb is often shaved thinly and served raw with steak or pork.
  • Sweet Onion
  • Lettuce

Recipes

Print

Roasted Kabocha with Maple Syrup & Ginger

-adapted from Food & Wine Magazine

Ingredients

  • 1 Kabocha Squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch-thick wedges
  • 3 tbsp pure maple syrup
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp peeled fresh ginger, finely grated
  • 6 thyme springs, plus thyme leaves for garnish
  • kosher salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F.

  2. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss the squash wedges with the maple syrup, olive oil, ginger, thyme sprigs and salt. 

  3. Arrange the squash in a single layer and roast for 15 minutes.

  4. Flip and roast for 15 minutes longer, until golden and tender. 

  5. Discard the thyme sprigs. Transfer the squash to a serving platter and garnish with thyme leaves.

Print

Beet Slaw with Pistachios and Raisins

“The pistachio butter underneath the slaw is like an Asian peanut sauce, bringing a much fuller nut flavor than the pistachios could offer alone. As you eat the dish, the juices from the slaw dissolve the pistachio butter and make a crazy good sort of vinaigrette. Serves 4”

Servings 4
Author -adapted from Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden

Ingredients

  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 1/4 lb beets; use a mix of colors if you can
  • 1/2 Fennel bulb, grated or sliced very thin
  • 1/4 cabbage, grated or sliced very thin
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1/4 cup lightly packed mint leaves
  • 1/2 tsp dried chili flakes
  • salt & pepper
  • olive oil
  • pistachio butter

Instructions

  1. Combine the garlic, raisins, and vinegar in a large bowl and let sit for 1 hour. Grate the beets, cabbage, and fennel on the large holes of a box grater or cut into fine julienne. Yes, your hands will get stained, but the color fades quickly.

  2. Remove the garlic from the raisins and discard. And the beets, lemon juice, most of the parsley and mint (save the rest for finishing), and chili flakes. Season with 1.5 tsp salt and lots of black pepper and toss. Let it sit for about 5 minutes and then taste—the slaw should be tart, spicy, peppery, and sweet. Adjust the seasoning, if necessary, then add ¼ cup olive oil. Toss and taste again.

  3. To serve, plate and top with the slaw. Finish with reserved fresh herbs and a drizzle of olive oil.

Dinner Menu: Oct. 19-20, 2017

Antipasti

Grilled seasonal vegetables, marinated olives, lemon vinaigrette, GTF bread    8

Baked local chevre, roasted onions, garlic, local apples and crostini     9

Mixed greens, lemon vinaigrette     6.5

GTF salad, watermelon radish, roasted pumpkin seed, goat cheese, garlic basil vinaigrette   9.5

Red Quinoa salad, beet, red napa cabbage, blue cheese 7.5

Bignè, duck liver mousse, mixed green  7.5

Panzanella salad with golden bread cubes, tomatoes, red onion, kalamata, capers, basil   6.5

Beef meatballs with tomato sauce and mixed greens 7.5

Barley and lentil soup 6

 

Pizze Rosse

with GTF  tomato sauce

mozzarella and basil   13

mozzarella, corn and roasted pepper 13

bacon and bleu cheese 13

add an egg or anchovies 1

Pizze Bianche

With béchamel sauce

kalamata and goat cheese13

sausage and leek13

mozzarella, ham and scallion13

add an egg or anchovies 1

 

Primi e Secondi

Beet, pecorino, onion tortellini, greens, cream sauce     20

Crepe, ricotta, corn, greens, braised red cabbage, basil pesto     16

Prime beef ribs, mashed potatoes, kale, carrot, horse radish aioli*     24

Duck breast, parsnip puree, spinach, honey   22

Carlton farm pork chops, creamy polenta, chard, carrot, basil pesto 22

Newport, OR albacore tuna, Israeli cous-cous, spinach, carrot, onion, romesco sauce   20

 

Dolci

Flourless Fudge Cake, caramel, cream   5

Warm Rose Tapioca, strawberry preserves, orange shortbread   5

Spiced Pumpkin Ice Cream, caramel sauce, pecans, white chocolate   7

Quince Upside Down Cake, cardamom custard  7

Lunch Menu: Week of Oct. 17-20, 2017

Carrot and scarlet kabocha soup, served with bread

Antipasti

chad fell’s bread & olives    5

emily’s farm fresh pickle plate    4

GTF kimchee    4

vegetarian french onion soup, served with bread     5

carrot and scarlet kabocha soup, served with bread    5

mixed greens with balsamic    6.5

GTF salad – goat cheese, pumpkin seeds, croutons, and a maple poppyseed dressing     9.5Coriander and paprika braised pork shoulder on fresh orrechiette with broccoli & collards

 

Pizze Rosse

garlic & basil    13

corn & roasted pepper   13

bacon & bleu   13

 

 

Pizze Bianche

kalamata & goat cheese  13

sausage & leek 13

ham & scallion   13

 

 

add an egg, pickled jalapenos, or anchovies   1

 


Seafood risotto of prawns with roma tomatoes, chives, peppers and traveso


Secondi

poached egg on polenta with celeriac, sunchokes, delicate, butternut and balsamic    13

seafood risotto of prawns with roma tomatoes, chives, peppers and traveso    14

brodetto of albacore tuna, prawns, kale, potatoes and tomatoes topped with aioli    14

coriander and paprika braised pork shoulder on fresh orrechiette with broccoli & collards   14

CSA 2017 – Week 19: Misty Mountain Morning

CSA Newsletter – Week 19


Misty Mountain Morning

Every day that I come to the farm I feel so lucky to work in such a beautiful place. This morning the patches of cold fog were bouncing around from field to field, sliding down the mountains and settling into the valleys before dispersing, giving way to crisp, clear, blue skies, bright with the apricity of the warm winter sun. In the heat of the season we try to get our lettuces and other cool-weather crops harvested as early in the morning as possible to prevent wilting, but at this point in the season we have to wait for the day to warm up so that the light frost melts off the leaves before we can harvest.

In addition to regular harvest, today our field crews spent the morning seeding garlic and fava beans. The garlic will overwinter to be harvested fresh in the spring as whole heads and scapes. The favas will be harvested in the spring as well for both their greens and their beans. We’ve finished the mad summer rush of tomato and pepper harvesting and are now spending the majority of our time washing and grading root crops.

Farming requires you to be able to acclimate to such a wide range of temperatures. The challenge in the summer was how to get through long, hot days in full sun. Now the challenge is how to stay warm while washing vegetables in incredibly cold water, or while harvesting vegetables in cold, dense fog and rain. It’s amazing to have such a hard-working group of people dedicated to the full farming season. Every item in this box is making its way to you because of the daily efforts of those fine individuals.

-Laura Bennett, markets@gatheringtogetherfarm.com

Table of Box Contents

  • 2 Delicata Squash—These are the squash we’ve all been waiting for. Delicata is incredibly sweet and flavorful, and it even lends itself to easy sautéing. When sautéing, just slice it into thin half-moons. The skin is soft enough to leave on, but roasted halves of delicata are probably my favorite way to enjoy them.
  • LeeksThe butter-flavored onion of winter, perfect in any sauté, in soups, and even roasted. Make sure to use your green tops to get the most out of your leek experience, they just take a little bit longer to cook than the white part, or you can add them into a stock.
  • Green CauliflowerThese taste pretty much the same as white cauliflower, although it can sometimes have a nutty flavor more similar to the Romanesco that you got last week.
  • Parsley Root—Don’t confuse this root with a parsnip, because they are two very different things. Parsley root tastes pretty much exactly like parsley; add to a roasted root medley or sauté to taste it.
  • Black Radish—Also known as a Spanish radish, these radishes are black on the outside and white on the inside. At first taste, they may taste as sweet as a salad turnip, but the horseradish-like heat will sneak up on ya!
  • Bunched Red Radishes—Great for salads and slaws, or even lightly roasted with other roots.
  • Cipoliini Onion—With the highest sugar content out of all the onions we grow, these are perfect for caramelizing.
  • Curly Green Kale— Kale and Potatoes with fried eggs on top are a delicious autumn breakfast.
  • Nicola Potatoes—Yellow and buttery
  • Bunched Carrots
  • Sweet Onion
  • Lettuce

Recipes

Print

Kale-Stuffed Delicata Squash

Ingredients

  • 2 medium to large Delicata Squash, halved and seeds removed
  • 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 medium apples, peeled, cored and finely chopped
  • 2 medium to large Leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned of grit, split in half lengthwise, and sliced into 1/4-inch half-moons
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 2 tsp)
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 bunch kale, rinsed, thick stems removed, shredded
  • 1 cup cottage cheese
  • 3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for topping
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into 8 small cubes

Instructions

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 375°F. Rub squash with 1 tablespoon oil and lightly season with salt and pepper, then lay on a baking sheet. If squash halves do not sit flat on baking sheet, use a vegetable peeler to trim a strip or two away from the bottom to allow them to lie flat. Bake until flesh is starting to turn tender and a paring knife inserted shows just a little resistance, about 25 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, prepare the stuffing. Heat remaining olive oil in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the apples and leeks and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Stir in the garlic, raisins and thyme. Cook, stirring occasionally, until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Reduce heat to medium, add kale, cover pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until kale is mostly wilted, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer mixture to a large bowl and let cool slightly. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

  3. Add cottage cheese, eggs, breadcrumbs and Parmesan. Mix well. Remove squash from oven and divide filling evenly among 4 halves. Sprinkle squash with additional breadcrumbs and Parmesan, and dot each squash half with 2 cubes of butter. If you have any leftover stuffing, bake it in a greased dish alongside. Return to oven and bake until squash is tender and stuffing is nicely browned, about 30 more minutes.

 

Print

Garlic Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower

Ingredients

  • 1 large head Cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • salt to taste
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tbsp garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • fresh parsley, chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

  2. Line a baking sheet with foil.

  3. In a large bowl, add cauliflower florets, olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic and paprika and mix everything well to combine.

  4. Transfer everything to the prepared baking sheet. The florets should be in a single layer.

  5. Bake the cauliflower for 15 minutes.

  6. Turn the florets to the other side, sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and bake 15 more minutes.

  7. Serve in a casserole and garnish with parsley.

Sunday Morning Breakfast—I’d never had parsley root before, so for breakfast on Sunday I threw a lil sauté together and it was sooooo good! I just sautéed cippolini onion, garlic, parsley root, and shitake mushrooms together, threw some chili oil in there and then poured a couple of eggs into the pan to scramble in with the veggies. I topped it with some Parmesan cheese and hot sauce and devoured it in what seemed like hardly thirty seconds.