Greenhouse Planning and Direct Seeding

While agribusiness may rely heavily on cutting edge technology and precision machines, Gathering Together Farm is in a lot of ways old school, using tools and techniques known to farmers for centuries. Joelene’s method of direct seeding in greenhouses showcases a couple of traditional practices that hold their own on our small-ag farm.

Starting back in December, Jolene began the monumental task of scheduling WHAT was going to be planted in WHICH greenhouse (There are no less than 38 of them now) and WHEN. She has a database of greenhouses and their rotation histories that she’s made into a large board with vegetable/fruit-name magnets that she can manipulate into different configurations to help her visually organize her ideas.

Because the GTF greenhouses come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes and each has a different history, she can only plant certain crops in certain houses.  Some greenhouses will be planted with short season greens that will have time to produce and harvest before the ground needs to be prepped for later season greenhouse needs. Some will get early tomatoes and when they’re done, she’ll put in fall/winter crops, quick-to-mature greens, etc.

Because greenhouse space is limited, Joelene prioritizes room for tomatoes (three of four plantings are grown in greenhouses), cucumbers (all of which are grown in greenhouses), eggplant (most of which is grown in greenhouses), and basil (some is grown in greenhouses). There are already two houses full of strawberries and raspberries. She’ll fill in the rest of the houses where time and space allow with other early/late crops of greens, watercress, carrots, potatoes, scallions, radishes, celery, etc.

The preparation for each greenhouse varies also. Some need extra nutrients in the form of gypsum or chicken/rabbit compost. Most are tilled with a small tractor, and then beds are prepared by hand. Greenhouses that will be planted to heat-loving crops will get plastic mulch on the ground, and tomatoes and cucumbers also need trellising. Drip and/or overhead irrigation is already set up in most of the houses, but it often needs a little rerigging or upgrading before it can service young plants appropriately.

Not long after Joelene finalized her full greenhouse rotation schedule and had direct seeded the first few greenhouses, catastrophic flooding hit the farm. When the Marys River receded, greenhouses were left extremely wet and muddy, and most of what was planted had washed away. The high waters also threw a monkey wrench into Joelene’s tightly scheduled plan for greenhouse planting. Joelene took it all in stride, and she made a series of small decisions that will make the best of the farm’s conditions and seasonal timing.

There were four lone greenhouses on the farm that were not flooded, and yesterday Joelene headed out to direct seed one of them. It had previously housed a beautiful potato crop, and after the tubers were pulled, the beds were left intact. While this was convenient because the crew could skip many of the ground preparation rituals, the actual soil was rather chunky and had a top layer of leaf mulch and other organic debris, which were added to enhance soil development. Joelene had planned to plant lettuce for salad mix here, but lettuce germinates best when seeds can be planted almost on top of moist soil. The conditions here just weren’t right because of the rough and dry surface with wet soil only an inch or so below. After deliberating a minute or so, Joelene made a quick switch from lettuce to spinach. This choice meant that she will have to fit in a lettuce planting elsewhere in the next week or so. It also means she’ll have to reconfigure the irrigation in this hoophouse to accomodate three drip irrigation lines per bed instead of overhead watering.

This is Joelene’s seeder. Even though she can drive her seeder tractor into some of the greenhouses, she prefers to direct seed with this relic because she can fit a bigger crop in tighter rows with her push seeder. In this location, she chose to use a disc seeding implement because she thought it would do a better job of cutting into the heavily mulched soil surface.

Here’s the bottom of the seeder unit. It has a dial gauge that regulates spacing of seeds. Each crop is seeded at a different setting, but Joelene has a mental catalog of seed sizing and spacing info in her head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She fills the hopper with spinach seed.

Inside the hopper, brushes sweep seeds out through the disk implement at a set spacing.

She’s loaded up.

In this case, Joelene not only had to walk up and down the rows 12 times, but in order to get the spinach seeded through the mulch layer, she had to put a good deal of pressure on the seeder frame as she traveled.

After a quick trial, she checked the spacing, depth, and consistency.

Each of the four beds got three rows of spinach. The seeds were embeded deep enough that they’re not visible anymore.

After seeding the whole greenhouse, Joelene tightly shut the door flaps. Today she will go back and cover the beds with floating row cover to add extra heat to the soil. The spinach will be ready for harvest in about two months, and when it’s finished, this greenhouse will get planted with cucumbers in early June.

Without any soil preparations, seeding this greenhouse took about an hour start to finish. There are still over 30 greenhouses to plant in the next few weeks, and many of them will require quite a bit more labor to get them ready. Winter may be a quieter time on the farm, but there is certainly no shortage of work to do.

 

January’s Pig – 2012

 

salame nostrano
surface culture

We have survived the inundation and are heading strong into the new year at Gathering Together Farm. As you recall in an earlier post, Aimee chronicled the breakdown of the Mosaic Farm pig. Here is one of the projects begun on that day.

I ground muscle portions from the ham and the shoulder and  tossed with red wine, garlic, salt, a fermenting culture and finally large diced fatback. This sticky brat was stuffed into beef middles, tied, weighed and labeled. From there the young salamis go into a fermenting chamber where the fermenting culture becomes active and lactic acid is produced in large enough amounts to discourage any other bacterial growth. Once the pH has dropped sufficiently, the salamis head for the drying chamber. A drying chamber is temperature and humidity controlled to allow for a slow water loss from drying meats/salamis. At a 35% water loss the salami reaches another benchmark for safety…there is not enough water available for bacterial growth. We are technically there but will need more time to develop depth and complexity of  flavor. Coming soon to a salumi platter near you!

Checking the salame nostrano for moisture loss.

Featured Partner: Compote

This is the first in an occasional series spotlighting Gathering Together Farm’s restaurant and grocery store partners. 

Compote is a comfortable, family-friendly bakery and cafe in SE Portland that serves breakfast and lunch Tuesday through Sunday. Owner Shauna Lane-Block places a strong emphasis on wholesome simple meals full of locally-sourced, farm-direct produce and eggs. Everything on the menu is made from scratch, and the coffee (from PDX’s own Ristretto Roasters) is deliciously made to order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The roasted root and kale soup (including many GTF-supplied ingredients) was a big hit.

The egg salad sandwich was spiced up with a healthy dose of GTF arugula, and it came with a side salad of mixed greens (also from GTF).

The coffee was bold and rich, perfect for warming up hands and bellies on a cold day.

Compote also bakes a wide selection of pastries in-house.

A great play area accompanies a versatile kids’ menu, and the waitstaff is especially patient, friendly, and understanding around young children.

As farmers, we truly appreciate Compote’s commitment to supporting local, organic producers, and we look forward to sending more vegetables their way in the future.

Compote:

2032 SE Clinton St.
Portland, OR 97202
 
503-234-5689
 
8 am to 4 pm Tuesday through Friday
3 am to 3 pm Saturday and Sunday
 

For more information, visit Compote’s website or “like” Compote on Facebook.

(Restaurants in the Corvallis, Newport, or Portland areas that are interested in buying GTF fruits and vegetables should contact the GTF office staff via email: gtf@gatheringtogetherfarm.com.)