2016 CSA – Week 17: Celeriac

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CSA Newsletter – Week 17


Celeriac: a very delicious, underrated vegetable

The bizarre-looking ball of root in your box this week is actually one of the most delicious flavors of fall. Don’t be deterred by its gnarly, knobby exterior, this fall crop is incredibly delicious when roasted, braised, made into soup, or even raw. If you can get past the unusual exterior and its somewhat cumbersome shape, I promise that celeriac won’t disappoint.

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Celeriac

Celeriac is a bit of a an exotic vegetable in that it is very slow growing and takes most of the growing season to mature. While plantings of such things as lettuce, cilantro, and spinach come and go, celeriac is seeded in late March and is in the ground from June to October. It is somewhat challenging to harvest because of its gnarly root system and it is a bit of a bear to wash because of all those crevices that the roots create.

If you want to sample this truly special vegetable, make it into soup with such things as leeks, apples, and potatoes or a gratin with potatoes. However, my favorite way to prepare celeriac is a bit more indulgent: celeriac fries with homemade mayonnaise. I find that the best way to appreciate its subtle flavor and creamy texture is to eat it on its own. No matter how you prepare celeriac, I hope that eating it is a pleasure!

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Kohlrabi

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  Celeriac ($3.00) – Peal or cut off the outer skin of the celeriac and add to soups, mashed potatoes, or make fries. See recipe.

☐  1 Jester Squash ($2.25) – This squash is a cross between a delicata and an acorn squash. The flesh is most and sweet when cooked and the seeds are delicious roasted as well.

☐  1 Gil’s Golden Pippin Squash ($1.00) – This little acorn squash is delicious and sweet. The skin is thin enough to eat if you like and it is delicious roasted or sautéed.

  Savoy Cabbage ($2.75) – This beautiful cabbage can be used in any cabbage recipe and the leaves are particularly good for stuffing.

☐  2 Colored Peppers ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Golden Beets ($3.50) – Eat the beats and the greens too! Golden beets are delicious on their own or incorporated into a salad.  

☐  1 Bunch Arugula ($3.00) – Arugula is such a versatile green. It is delicious in salads, with eggs, on sandwiches, or even as pesto. See Recipe.

  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.50)

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25) – Kohlrabi is delicious raw and cooked. Peal the outer skin and eat the crunchy, mild inside in salad, dips, or roasted. See Recipe.

☐  Cilantro ($2.00)

☐  1 Tomato ($2.00)

Box Market Value: $27.75

 

Recipes

Garlic & Herb Celeriac Fries

Use any herb combination you like or even just a little salt. For a delicious dip make some aioli or mix pesto with mayonnaise. For a simpler version, skip the boiling step and stick the celeriac fries strait in the oven.

Ingredients

  • 1 celeriac
  • 2 tbsp oil (olive oil or coconut oil works best)
  • 2 tsp oregano
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • salt and pepper
  • 4 stalks of rosemary

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 F.
  2. Peel and cut the celeriac in wedges or fries. Fill a pan with cold water and add the celeriac. Bring to the boil, drain the fries and allow them to steam dry. Add the oregano, garlic, salt and pepper and mix well.
  3. Heat the oil on a baking tray in the oven. When the oil is hot, remove from the oven and add the fries to the tray. Top with the rosemary stalks and return the tray to the oven for 35-40 minutes.

Read More: MyFussyEater

 

Kohlrabi

This may be another unfamiliar vegetable in your box this week. Kohlrabi is in the brassica family along with kale, broccoli, and cabbage. It is delicious raw in salads or slaws, sliced and eaten with hummus or other dips, or roasted. The possibilities are endless!

Roasted Kohlrabi with Parmesan

Ingredients

  • 6 kohlrabi
  • 2 table spoons olive oil
  • ¾ tsp kosher salt
  • a pinch of cayenne (optional)
  • 3 Tbsp. parmesan cheese
  • 1 Tbsp. parsley

Preparation

Peel kohlrabi and cut into 1-inch wedges; toss with olive oil, kosher salt and a pinch of cayenne on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast at 450 F, stirring every 10 minutes, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes. Toss with parmesan and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley.

Read More: FoodNetwork

For more information about Kohlrabi and for a list of kohlrabi recipes, visit SimplyRecipes.

 

Arugula Pesto

Pesto is a great way to preserve the flavors of herbs or greens for later use. Pest is delicious on pasta but also on roasted veggies or mixed with mayonnaise aioli for a delicious dip or dressing.

 Ingredients

  • 2 cups of packed arugula leaves, stems removed
  • 1/2 cup of shelled walnuts
  • 1/2 cup fresh Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, unpeeled
  • 1/2 garlic clove peeled and minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preparation

  1. Brown the garlic: Brown 6 garlic cloves with their peels on in a skillet over medium high heat until the garlic is lightly browned in places, about 10 minutes. Remove the garlic from the pan, cool, and remove the skins.
  2. Toast the nuts: Toast the nuts in a pan over medium heat until lightly brown, or heat in a microwave on high heat for a minute or two until you get that roasted flavor. In our microwave it takes 2 minutes.
  3. Process in food processor: (the fast way) Combine the arugula, salt, walnuts, roasted and raw garlic into a food processor. Pulse while drizzling the olive oil into the processor. Remove the mixture from the processor and put it into a bowl. Stir in the Parmesan cheese.

Adjust to taste: Because the pesto is so dependent on the individual ingredients, and the strength of the ingredients depends on the season or variety, test it and add more of the ingredients to taste.

Read More: SimplyRecipes

2016 CSA – Week 2: Storing Produce

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CSA Newsletter – Week 2


Storing Produce

Storing produce is not only important for you to make the most of your box, but it is also an essential part of our farming operation. Throughout the season and especially during fall, we will harvest large quantities of a crop that matures at the same time such as cabbage, winter squash, beets, carrots, and other root vegetables. These crops are stored in large totes, cardboard boxes, or wooden crates. Some produce does best stored just above freezing while other produce keeps best at warmer temperatures.

Proper storage is so critical for our farming operation because we often harvest more produce than we can sell immediately. Proper storage techniques help us hold our harvest so that we can sell it gradually, over time. On the farm, we have two walk in coolers where space is at a premium, especially during fall harvest. But we also have to get creative when space is limited. In the fall we convert our propagation houses into winter squash storage and the shelves in our packing shed fill up with bins of onions.

This week is all about proper produce storage so that you can make the most of your CSA. So don’t feel overwhelmed if you have more potatoes or carrots than you can eat this week. Store them properly and you can eat them several weeks from now!  The backside of the newsletter has a storage guide that we have compiled over the years. If you have any storage tips or tricks that you would like to share, we would love to hear from you!

– Lily Walton, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents:

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($4.50)

☐ Swiss Chard ($3.00) separate the stems from the leaves for cooking. Great sautéed and cooks a bit quicker than kale.

☐ Bunch Beets ($3.50) roast or boil the beats and use the greens for sautéing. Balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre with beets is a personal favorite.

☐ Arugula ($3.00) Use as a salad green, in sandwiches, pasta salad, or even make pesto!

☐ Baby Onions ($2.50) Onions with a bonus! Use the greens as you would scallions.

☐ 2 Zucchini ($1.50)

☐ Kohlrabi ($1.25) Delicious fresh or dressed in salads

☐ 2 cucumbers ($2.00)

☐ Dry Garlic ($1.50) Bend this up with some arugula or basil for fresh pesto

☐ Storage Onion ($1.50)

☐ Bunch Basil ($3.00) trim the stems and place them in a glass or jar of water, just like cut flowers. Loosely cover it with a plastic bag and leave it on the counter.

☐ 1 Siletz Tomato ($2.50)

☐ 1 Pint of peas ($4.00) great for eating fresh, in salads, or in stir-fry.

☐ Lettuce ($2.00)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $35.75

 

Storage Tips:

VEGETABLE & storage time HOW TO STORE LONG TERM STORAGE TIPS (The big four: Freezing, Canning, Pickling, Dehydrating)
GREENS AND HERBS: Tender greens last about1 week; hardy greens 2 weeks. Store wrapped in a paper towel (or a mesh greens-bag if you have one) inside of a container or bag in the fridge.  Greens with their roots still attached keep well in a bowl of water. * Many types of herbs can be dried by hanging upside down with twine in a dry, sunny place.

* Many greens can be blanched and frozen. Or, make greens-pesto and freeze it.

* Hardier greens like kale can be coated with oil, salt & pepper, and baked to make chips.

DRY ROOTS

like potatoes, onions, garlic:

1-2 months

Keep them cool and dry. Keep potatoes in the dark lest the sunshine turn them green. * Potatoes do NOT freeze well.

* Make vegetable stock! Throw in almost any veggies and herbs, bring to a boil, simmer 30 min, strain, and freeze until you need it.

FRESH ROOTS like beets, carrots, radishes, onions:
1-2 months
Break off tops so the greens don’t continue to draw sugar out of the roots. Store in a closed container in fridge. Don’t scrub or peel until you’re ready to eat them, or they will get soft faster. * Many roots make good refrigerator pickles. Slice and cover with a mixture of your favorite vinegar, a spoonful of salt and sugar, and spices (like mustard seed, dill, coriander, etc.). After about 3 weeks the flavors will start to meld.

* Slice, coat with oil and dehydrate for chips.

TOMATOES

1-2 weeks

Store at room temperature. Don’t put them in the fridge or they will get watery and weird! Keep them dry. Tomatoes are superstars for canning or dehydrating. Sauce can also be frozen, but the texture and flavor will not be quite the same.
MISCELLANEOUS VEGGIES  (broccoli, fennel, cabbage, etc.) and FRUITS (any “vegetable” with seeds inside, like zucchini, pepper, cucumber, etc.):
1-2 weeks
Most veggies like to be kept dry in the fridge with limited air exposure. DO NOT GET FRUITS WET. Plastic or glass containers are great; plastic bags are not quite as good because they limit air circulation too much.

Melons, eggplant, tomatillos, and peppers can stay at room temp a few days, but they prefer it cooler for longer storing.

* Many veggies can be blanched and frozen.

* Grate carrots or zucchini into muffins, and freeze to pull out for breakfast later.

* Refrigerator pickles (see above). Pickled peppers and cucumbers are especially popular, but there’s no reason not to get creative with veggies like broccoli, green beans or fennel!

* Make sauerkraut out of extra cabbage by slicing and keeping it immersed in salt water.

* Brush thinly-sliced veggies like squash, beets, parsnips, etc. with oil and salt. Dehydrate for chips.

* With tomatillos, make salsa verde for canning or blanch and freeze.

 

CSA 2011 – Week 9: If I Had a CSA Box I Would…

I’ve decided to take this week to tell you how I would use all of the produce in a CSA box.
Candy Onions: I would caramelize them like the recipe on the back and then combine them with the sautéed green beans.
Beans: see recipe on back.

Potatoes: Boil them and mash them with butter and cream. You could also chop them into 2– inch pieces, toss in olive oil, salt, garlic and herbs. Roast them at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. Try boiling them whole, let them cool and then grate them to make potato pan-cakes or pan-fried hash browns.

Green Pepper: My favorite way to eat these is grilled or roasted whole until the outside gets slightly charred. You can then peel the pepper or not and add it to a sandwich with arugula-basil pesto, lettuce and tomato.

Squash: Summer squash is wonderful chopped in half, coated with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and salt and then grilled. Another way of preparing it is to chop it into thin strips and toss it in olive oil and salt and roast it at 375 degrees for about 20 minutes or until cooked thoroughly. I also hear that you can grate it raw and freeze it for later zucchini breads. Another CSA member told me she likes to chop the squash and layer it in a casserole dish with cheese and other veggies and bake it!

Cucumber: I like cucumbers raw dipped in hummus or salad dressings of some sort. The salad dressing on the back would be a perfect cucumber dip.

Arugula: Arugula is a tasty salad green. You can eat it raw with dressing (see recipe on back). Another great way to use the Arugula is in pesto with basil. I usually split the basil and arugula half and half so that you get to taste both equally. Their flavors complement each other well. This pesto goes nicely on a sandwich, as a dip or even as the base for a pesto pasta of some sort. I tend to like arugula slightly wilted as well because it cuts the spicy bitter edge that it tends to have. Try it wilted on top of pizza.

Romaine Lettuce: I really enjoy the grilled Caesar salad that I put a recipe for a few weeks ago. Romaine is a great crispy lettuce with a nice mild flavor. It goes well on sandwiches, or as salad. A woman I work with just suggested making lettuce rolls with the large leaves. You could stuff these with some tomato, pesto, and cucumbers. If you’re a meat eater, add some bacon! Mushrooms and cheese might go nicely as well.

Carrots: I enjoy these carrots as they are, raw! I know some CSA members who cut them up into carrot sticks for the week. Try them grated raw with raisins, oil and vinegar.

Basil: I am a huge pesto fan personally, but there are many ways to use basil. In fact, basil is a great addition to an Asian stir fry of squash, green beans, and carrots with soy sauce, sesame oil and seeds, some chili flakes and served over rice. Also, try making a tomato salad, or use in the salad dressing recipe.

Blueberries: Eat them raw, make a smoothie, or add them to pancakes!

Tomatoes: Eat them raw on salad. Combine with pesto. You could even try them stuffed with cheese and herbs and baked at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

What’s in the box?

…I suppose you just found out. 🙂

 

Recipes:

Simply Green Beans
1 lb green beans
2 cloves of garlic, chopped
2 Tablespoons Parsley or herbs chopped (optional)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt

First take both ends off of the beans simply by snapping and put beans into a bowl. Blanch beans quickly in salted boiling water for about 1-2 minutes. Heat olive oil in a pan and add beans and garlic. Add herbs last and season to taste. For extra flavor add butter at the very end. To spice it up, add some chili flakes.

Candy Onion Compote
2 candy onions, peeled and sliced thinly
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil

Cook the onions in butter and olive oil on low heat for 30 minutes or more. Onions will turn a light brown color and develop a caramel taste. Use this as a topping for most savory dishes. Variations: Add thinly chopped carrots and/or summer squash or green pepper for more variety.

Arugula and Romaine Salad with Roasted Tomato Dressing
Dressing:
1 large tomato or a few small tomatoes
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 cup basil leaves, chopped
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt

Chop the tomato into 3-4 larger pieces, and roast in the oven at 400 degrees for about 30-45 minutes or until somewhat dried out, but not dark. Place tomatoes in a blender or food processor. On low speed, add garlic and vinegar. Drizzle in olive oil, add the basil last and salt to taste.

Use this dressing on top of washed and chopped Arugula and Romaine together. The
romaine will balance out the spice of the Arugula and the sweetness of the dressing will compliment the two. Add the other tomato chopped on top, the cucumber or even blanched green beans.