2016 CSA – Week 12: Picked by Hand, Ripe off the Vine

CSA Week 12 Graphic

CSA Newsletter week 12


Picked by Hand, Ripe off the Vine

Harvest time is in full swing and it sure is lovely to see the bounty of delicious food all over
the farm, and beyond! With such a volume of produce all around us, it is easy to forget that
everything is harvested by hand, when it is ripe. That means that each ear of corn is touched to check for
maturity and a full ear before it is picked. Each watermelon is tapped for the telltale thud of
ripeness. Each pepper is evaluated for the perfect coloration. Each green bean is selected for crispness
and maturity. Wow, that is a lot of work and a lot of hands!

Many hands are the nature of our organic agriculture system. Careful, skilled hands work hard
to pick, plant, and grow the best produce for recipients such as you, every day. The quality of the
produce that results from all of our hard work is the ultimate reward.

Here’s to savoring each and every bite. Enjoy!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents
☐  Lettuce ($2.00)
☐  1½ lbs Yellow Potatoes ($2.25)
☐  2 Pimento Peppers ($2.25) – A thick walled, deep red sweet pepper that is often found canned in the grocery store. Delicious as pimento cheese or in any recipe calling for red pepper.
☐  2 Italian Peppers ($1.25) – Grill or broil and use in soups, sandwiches, dips, or salad.
☐  1 Bunch Basil ($3.00) – Delicious with tomatoes, as pesto, or as basil butter. See recipe!
☐  1 Golden Crown Watermelon ($6.00)
☐  1 Dried Red Onion ($0.50)
☐  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Serve fresh in salads, on sandwiches, or caramelize and serve with sautéed veggies.
☐  Bunch Carrots ($3.50)
☐  1 Head Napa Cabbage ($3.00) – Make an Asian slaw, stir-fry, spring rolls, or try making homemade kimchi
☐ 3 Big Beef Tomatoes ($6.00)
☐ 4 Ears of Corn ($4.00) – Delicious raw, grilled, or steamed. Try with basil butter! (See recipe)

Box Market Value: $35.50

 

The Lee Brothers Pimento Cheese

I was introduced to Pimento Cheese while living in North Carolina during
college. It is delicious on just about anything but is traditionally served
between to pieces of bread. Like many southern classics, there are many
regional variations so feel free to modify the recipe to your liking!
Ingredients

  • 8 ounces extra-sharp cheddar cheese, grated
  • ¼ cup softened cream cheese (2 ounces), pulled into several pieces
  • ½ cup roasted pimento peppers finely diced
  • 3 tablespoons Duke’s,store-bought mayonnaise (or make your own)
  • ½ teaspoon dried red chileflakes
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. In a large mixing bowl, place the cheddar cheese in an even layer.
  2. Scatter the cream cheese, pimentos, mayonnaise and chile flakes over the cheddar cheese.
  3. Using a spatula, mix the pimento cheese until it is smooth and spreadable, about 1 1/2 minutes.
  4. Transfer the pimento cheese to a plastic container or bowl, cover tightly, and store in the refrigerator.
  5. Pimento cheese keeps in the refrigerator for 1 week.Read More: NYT Cooking

 

Basil Butter

Butter is delicious on just about everything and herbed butter is really delicious on just  about everything! Put this butter on grilled corn, toast, and just about anything else. This butter will keep for about a week or two.

Ingredients

  • 2 sticks unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 cup basil, loosely packed
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt

Preparation

  1. Add the butter, basil, and salt to a food processer and blend.
  2. You may need to scrape down the sides once or twice.
  3. When the basil is finely chopped and the butter has a light green tint, it’s done.Read More: Food52

 

Napa Cabbage Salad with Sweet Tamari-Sesame Dressing

Napa Cabbage Salad Ingredients

  • 1 large head napa cabbage, washed and finelychopped
  • 4 scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into matchsticks
  • 1 red pepper, seeded and cut into matchsticks
  • ½ to ¾ cup fresh cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons sunflower seeds (optional)
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons sesame seeds

Tamari-Sesame Dressing Ingredients

  • ¼ cup rice vinegar
  • 3½ tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon tamari (soy sauce)
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup or honey

Preparation

  1. In a large serving bowl, combine the cabbage, scallions, carrots, red pepper, and cilantro.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the rice vinegar, olive oil, sesame oil, tamari, and maple syrup
    or honey until emulsified.
  3. Pour the dressing over the salad, thoroughly toss to coat, and sprinkle with the seeds.Read More: Blissful Basil

August 20th Market Recipes ft. Crockett Green Beans

A big thanks to everyone who braved the heat and made it out to one of our farmers markets yesterday! Our marketeers and our produce were a bit wilted by the end of the day, but we made it through! Despite the heat wave, there was still one very good reason to turn on the stove, and that reason was green beans.

Last season we grew a new variety of bush beans called Crockett and we were blown away by their highly productive growth habit and even ripening. Not only did they yield extremely well, but their quality of flavor and plumpness were exceptional, so much so that we sold out nearly every market. Yesterday at market we cooked up some of our Crockett beans and sampled many other summer treats raw. At home, I made lacto-fermented dilly beans that remain crisp and flavorful throughout the winter months!

20160803_110300 (2)

  • Crockett Green Bean Sauté with Tamari
    • Ingredients:
      • 1-2 lbs. green beans
      • 1 large shallot, finely chopped
      • 4-6 cloves garlic or 2-3 cloves elephant garlic, minced
        • Some of our markets carry elephant garlic, but in Corvallis I used some wonderful garlic from Goodfoot Farm.
      • Olive oil
      • Tamari
      • Salt
    • Directions:
  1.  Pre-snap the stems off of your green beans. It takes a bit of time, so I prefer to do it before I turn on the pan. Either leave your beans long, or snap them in half, whichever you prefer.
  2. Coat the pan in olive oil and heat up to medium high temperature. Meanwhile, chop up your shallots and add them into the oil once it’s up to temperature.
  3. Add about 3-4 Tbsp tamari to the shallots in the pan and let cook about 2 minutes. This will make a kind of tamari reduction that will coat your beans.
  4. Add in your snapped green beans and stir around to coat in oil, adding more if need be. Cover and let cook about 5 minutes, as the green beans take a while to cook through and will need the extra heat. Meanwhile, mince garlic.
  5. Remove the lid from the pan and add in the garlic, 2-3 pinches of salt, and 2-3 more Tbsp of tamari. Let cook another 5-10 minutes to your preferred softness.
  6. This is a great dish as it is so full of protein it can be eaten solo, but it is also wonderful served with a side of rice next to chicken or tofu. Green bean season is now! Don’t miss out on the deliciousness.
  • Tomato Basil Salad (July 2nd post)Copy of CAM00415 (2)
  • Raw Pimento Peppers
    • Pimento peppers look like flattened red bell peppers, but with thick walls and a crazy sweet flavor. I like to eat them raw like apples this time of year, but they’re also excellent raw as a vehicle for dip or cooked lightly in a sauté. See the photo at right.
  • Melons!!! Check out next week’s post for a detailed breakdown of our 2016 melon varieties.
    • Red, Orange, Yellow, and Sorbet WatermelonIMG_20150822_155628 (2)
    • Charentais and Divergent Cantaloupe
    • Honey Orange Melon

 

2016 CSA – Week 7: Seed Selection: Growing Larger Grey Shallots

CSA Week 7 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 7


Seed Selection: Growing Larger Grey Shallots

Most of the seed that we use at our farm comes from seed companies around the country from Johnny’s Select Seeds in Maine to Osborne Seed Company in Washington and everywhere in-between.  Sometimes our seeds are even sourced from companies in Europe. Specialty crops such as potatoes and ginger, that are cultivated vegetatively, are often source from specific farms that grow specific varieties for seed.

While we typically leave seed selection and saving up to seed companies sometimes, we do some seed saving of our own. Several years ago, we acquired some grey shallot seed from a farmer in Southern Oregon. Grey Shallots are a true shallot which means they only reproduce vegetatively. Grey shallot seed is simply a grey shallot that is planted in the ground to grow and reproduce more. Since then, we have been selecting the largest, best-looking shallots each year as seed for next year’s crop.

This week, I had the opportunity to be a part of the grey shallot seed selection process. We set aside 1,000 of the biggest shallots from this year’s harvest. This year’s seed is about three times larger than the seed that we started with initially! I am certainly looking forward to even larger grey shallots next year.

Have a great week and enjoy those veggies.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

2 Anaheim Peppers ($2.00) – This versatile, mild chili pepper can be used in chili rellenos, salsa, or in any recipe that calls for peppers.

Fresh Cipollini Onions ($2.50) – Delicious in eggs, salad, or grilled

1 Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

1 Colored Bell Pepper ($2.00)

Bunched Purple Carrots ($3.50)

1 Bunch Basil ($3.00) – Make pesto or caprese salad with your heirloom tomato and some fresh mozzarella.

2 Leeks ($3.00) – Delicious  and very versatile. Enjoy them grilled, sautéed, in soup, or in a savory galette or frittata.

1 Bunch Swiss Chard ($3.00) – Sauté and put in a savory galette and make a dip with the stems. See recipes!

2 Cucumbers ($2.00)

1 Heirloom Tomato ($4.50)

1 Pint Strawberries ($4.00)

Box Market Value: $35.25

 

Recipes

Romesco

Romesco is a delicious Catalonian roasted pepper sauce that can be used as a dip, dressing, or eaten all by itself. I first had it in our very own Farmstand and was blown away by its rich, smoky flavor.

There are many variations of romesco. This simple recipe comes from my friend Lisa, the person who introduced me to this wonderful sauce.

Ingredients

  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 peeled, roasted bell peppers
  • (roast on the grill or in the oven)
  • ½ cup olive oil (more to taste)
  • ½ cup roasted almonds
  • lemon juice to taste
  • salt to taste
  1. Grind the nuts and garlic in a food processor until the mixture is fairly fine
  2. Add the peppers and a pinch of salt and process to combine
  3. While processor is running, slowly add the olive oil. Add salt, lemon juice, and olive oil to taste.

What to Do with Those Stems?

I always use the stems of my chard. I either add them to my sauté before the leaves or set them aside for use in making stock. However, I haven’t ventured to make any dishes that feature the chard stems themselves.

Once I started looking, I found recipes for chard stems. I love this NYT Cooking recipe for Swiss chard stem dip but the recipes for pickled Swiss chard stems, Chard Stems with Sesame-Yogurt Sauce and Black Sesame Seeds, Baked Swiss Chard Stems Recipe with Olive Oil and Parmesan sound delicious too!

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Swiss chard stalks, coarsely chopped (about 4 cups)
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 to 4garlic cloves (to taste), peeled, green shoots removed
  • ½cup sesame tahini, stirred if the oil has separated
  • ¼ to ½cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste
  • 1tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Preparation

Steam the chard stalks about 15 minutes or until tender when pierced with a fork. Drain well, and allow to cool. Place in a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Puree, stopping the machine from time to time to scrape down the sides.

In a mortar, mash the garlic with 1/2 teaspoon salt until you have a smooth paste (you can also do this in the food processor). Add to the chard stalks. Process until smooth. Add the tahini, and again process until smooth. With the machine running, add the lemon juice and salt to taste. Stop the machine, taste and adjust seasonings.

Read More: Swiss Chard Stalk and Tahini Dip


Galette: The Sweet and Savory Catchall

Galettes are one of my favorite things to make. Take whatever is in season (or in your fridge), fold it up in your favorite pie crust, and it is guaranteed to be delicious. I typically make sweet galettes (because I have a terrible sweet tooth) but savory ones are equally delicious. 

If you have a favorite pie crust recipe, use that. Recently, I have been making an all butter crust from the NYT Cooking section that is simple and delicious. I typically bake my galettes in a hot oven (375-400) until the crust is golden brown and the filling has set (40-50 minutes)

Galette Tips:

-Sauté greens, onions, mushrooms, etc, before baking

-Drain excess liquid from ingredients before filling crust to prevent a soggy bottom

-Add cheese, herbs, mustard, pesto, etc as a base before adding filling

-Toss fruit with a bit of cornstarch or flour absorb excess moisture

-Leave room around the edges to fold over the crust, about 2-3 inches

-Brush crust with egg for a golden brown sheen and sprinkle with sugar or cheese
Read More:

July 9th Market Recipes

Here’s what we sampled up down at the waterfront yesterday!

  • The Lazy Man’s Pickle: Cucumbers with Dill and Lemon (July 2nd post)
  • Tomato Basil Salad (July 2nd post)20160706_085140 double purple cherokee label (2)
    • New Alteration: For those of you who came to market earlier in the day, this plate was made with Siletz tomatoes as it was on July 2nd. But later in the day, we decided to shake it up a bit and make the same dish with Purple Cherokee Heirloom tomatoes, which have a wonderfully unique flavor and a beautiful dark color.
  • Spinach Basil Salad (June 25th post)
    • I made this salad for dinner after market, along with thick slices of Siletz tomato and fresh mozzarella-like cheese from La Mariposa, a wonderful cheese vendor at the Corvallis Farmers Market. It was amazing! I highly recommend it.20160924_112541-2

NEW RECIPES:

  • Hot Chioggia Beet Salad (May 7th post)
    • New Alteration: The only difference here is that I used Chioggia beets, which have a white and red concentric circle design in the center. They tend to have a more mild beet flavor, and unlike typical red beets, they don’t turn everything you have dark pink. Also, they’re simply gorgeous, and that is reason enough to try them out. Sadly, I did not get a photograph of this dish before the people of Corvallis gobbled it up, but you can see a chioggia beet here.20160709_103448 (2)
  • Yellow Straightneck Squash with Red Mustard Greens
    • Ingredients:
      • 2-3 Pearl Onions, sliced thin or however you would like them
      • 1/2 head Garlic, minced
      • 4-5 Yellow Straightneck Squash, sliced thin into discs (They’re just like yellow crookneck squash, only… you guessed it, the neck is straight.)
      • 1 bunch Red Mustard Greens
      • Olive oil
      • Salt & Pepper to taste
    • Directions:
      • Pre-chop the onion and garlic.
      • Coat the pan in olive oil and heat up to medium-high until a piece of onion in the oil starts sizzling.
      • Add in the onion and garlic and stir around in the oil.
      • Slice up the squash into discs, and add them into the pan once you’re done. Stir around to coat in oil, adding more oil if need be. Let cook 5-8 minutes, stirring around occasionally for even cooking.
      • Roughly chop up a bunch of red mustard greens. With the heat that we’ve been having lately, our mustard greens have been getting spicier every day. Their lovely peppery flavor is especially delicious when paired with the creamy combination of garlic and summer squash.
      • Add in a couple pinches of both salt and pepper, and stir around. Let cook just 2-3 minutes more.
      • Let cool a few minutes and taste to see how your salt levels are, adjusting accordingly. This dish looks beautiful with the bright yellow squash and dark green leaves, and would be wonderful with rice and grilled chicken or tempeh. Enjoy!

 

Lunch Menu: Week of June 27, 2016

Seafood Curry-web

Seafood Curry

Antipasti

bread/olives  4.0

bread/ pesto  5.5

country pork pâté/mustard/cornichon  5.5

tomato/pesto/grilled pugliese 6.5

bruschetta/duck/duck 6.5

mixed field greens, balsamic vinaigrette  6.5

salad of duck breast/escarole/lentil  7.5

GTF salad–  tomato/blue/basil  10.5

gazpacho with prawn & strata crouton  6.5

zucchini and eggplant soup/ bread   4.5

 

Pizze Rosse

garlic/tomato/basil/mozz    9.5

duck/kale/mozz   10.5

mushrooms/goat chz/mozz   10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

tomato/blue/thyme/mozz  10.5

egg/bacon/scallion/mozz  10.5

ham/zukes/olives/mozz  10.5

–add an egg, pickled jalapenos

or anchovies for  $1

 

Agnolotti-web

Basil & Goat Cheese Agnolotti with Summer Squash & Carrots

Secondi

lamb ragú with pappardelle & black kale   10

basil & goat cheese agnolotti with summer squash & carrots  10

crespelle with beets, chard & basil pesto  10

duck leg confit on roasted potatoes with cabbage  11

seafood curry with garbanzos, peppers & tomato   12.5

 

Dolce

chocolate brioche bread pudding with caramel sauce  6.

cardamom crème brúlée with orange shortbread   6.