2019 CSA – Week 10: Como una Flor—the art of making beautiful bunches

CSA Newsletter – Week 10


Como una Flor—the art of making beautiful bunches

Welcome to week ten of CSA, folks, you’ve made it! Ten weeks of cooking and eating delicious, healthy, local, seasonal food! That’s medicine, folks, always be proud of yourself when you do your body and mind right. I’m super excited about many items in the box this week, such as poblanos and corn! But as some of you may remember from last year, gold beets are special to me. The gold beets in your box remind me of a day earlier last season out in the field, bunching beets. On this particular day, we had a lot of new people on the crew and we spent our day learning and teaching how to make beautiful, even bunches.

For beets and other round roots, we are taught to make bunches como una flor, like a flower, with one beet in the center and an array of beets around it. As we harvest, we make sure to gently pull the beets from the soil so as not to damage the delicate greens of the smaller beets that we leave behind to keep growing. On that day, we found a light gold beet and we made an exemplary bunch that more than any other was como una flor.

Whatever bunch you’re making, your twist tie can’t be too low or too high, too tight or too loose; the orientation of the leaves and roots must be just so, so that it turns out beautiful every time. Each bunch is hand-crafted, people who worked hard to make sure that that one bunch was perfect and beautiful, como una flor.

All my best,
LB

Table of Box Contents

  • Sweet Corn!!!!— The sugar content in sweet corn just went through the roof! We’re already onto our second corn planting, onto our favorite variety, Serendipity. It’s also a bicolor variety with a mosaic of sweet white and yellow kernels. Roast it, eat it—you know what to do.
  • Gold Beets—Sweet, earthy, gold. Beets, like the rest of us, come in many different shapes, colors, and sizes. For many people who have hated on beets in the past, gold beets provide the perfect opportunity to form a new, healthy beet relationship. Gold beets don’t turn everything in your pan red, and have a sweet, mild beet flavor that’s really lovely raw in slaws or roasted in the oven & dipped in aioli!
  • Poblano PeppersPoblanos are so rich in flavor with a lovely warmth, excellent in any sauté. The seeds however are very spicy! Be sure to wash your hands after removing the seeds.
  • GarlicOur garlic is almost all the way dried at this point, so the large cloves are still soooo easy to pop out of their peels. Such a treat!
  • Green Cabbage
  • Red Slicer Tomatoes
  • Willamette Sweet Onions
  • Dill
  • Zucchini
  • Lettuce
  • Nicola Potatoes

Recipes

Gold Beet Cabbage Slaw

“I know that some people hate coleslaw. But I’ve converted even the most fervent among them with this
version, which bears no resemblance to the cloying stuff many of us grew up eating. Light and clean, it’ll lend crunch and brightness to any plate… And remember, the richer the food you plan to serve with it, the more acidic the slaw should be.” —
Adapted from Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat, by Samin Nosrat (the Netflix star and next Michael Pollan)

Ingredients

  • 1/2 medium head Red or Green Cabbage
  • 1 bunch Gold Beets, grated or chopped thinly
  • 2 cloves Garlic, roughly minced
  • 1/2 small Onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup Lemon Juice
  • Salt
  • 1/2 cup Dill leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 3 tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
  • 6 tbsp Olive Oil

Instructions

  1. Quarter the cabbage through the core. Use a sharp knife to cut the core out at an angle. Thinly slice the cabbage crosswise and place in a colander set inside a large salad bowl. Season with two generous pinches of salt to help draw out water, toss the slices, and set
    aside.

  2.  In a small bowl, toss the sliced onion with the lemon juice and let it sit for 20 minutes to macerate. Set aside.

  3. After 20 minutes, drain any water the cabbage may have given off (it’s fine if there’s nothing to drain—sometimes cabbage isn’t very watery [but often in the early summer it is quite juicy]). Place the cabbage in the bowl and add the basil and the macerated onions (but not their lemony juices, yet). Dress the slaw with the vinegar and olive oil. Toss very well to combine.

  4. Taste and adjust, adding the remaining macerated lemon juice and salt as needed. When your plate zings with pleasure, it’s ready. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Store leftover slaw covered, in the fridge, for two-ish days.

 

Poblanos & Potatoes in the Skillet with Eggs

(AKA: LB's favorite breakfast)

Ingredients

  • 2 Poblano Peppers, seeded & chopped
  • 2-3 Potatoes, sliced thin and patted dry
  • 3 cloves Garlic, roughly chopped
  • Olive Oil, or a high heat oil like coconut
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • 4-6 Eggs, pan fried & served on top
  • Optional: Grated Cheese - I love a good sharp aged cheddar with this dish
  • Optional: Corn Kernels, cut from 1 ear

Instructions

  1. Chop your potatoes ahead of time to let them dry a bit. These are new digs potatoes, so they’ve still got a lot of water in them, and getting that water out is key to cooking your potatoes all the way through without burning them. Often times I’ll just chop my potatoes
    and then put them in between a cloth on cutting board and press the moisture out.

  2. Next chop poblanos and garlic.

  3. Heat up oil in pan to medium-high and put potatoes in, stir around and let cook a few minutes. Add in poblanos and stir and cook for a few more minutes.

  4. Add in garlic and a bit more oil and continue to cook uncovered until vegetables are done, preferably with a bit of golden brown-black charring on the edges.

  5. Add in some fresh corn just before turning off the pan and toss around for a sweet crunch amidst the creamy, savory poblanos & eggs.

  6. Sprinkle with salt after done cooking. Serve with fried eggs on top, and cheese in between the two steamy layers if so desired.

Lunch Menu: Week of June 27, 2016

Seafood Curry-web

Seafood Curry

Antipasti

bread/olives  4.0

bread/ pesto  5.5

country pork pâté/mustard/cornichon  5.5

tomato/pesto/grilled pugliese 6.5

bruschetta/duck/duck 6.5

mixed field greens, balsamic vinaigrette  6.5

salad of duck breast/escarole/lentil  7.5

GTF salad–  tomato/blue/basil  10.5

gazpacho with prawn & strata crouton  6.5

zucchini and eggplant soup/ bread   4.5

 

Pizze Rosse

garlic/tomato/basil/mozz    9.5

duck/kale/mozz   10.5

mushrooms/goat chz/mozz   10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

tomato/blue/thyme/mozz  10.5

egg/bacon/scallion/mozz  10.5

ham/zukes/olives/mozz  10.5

–add an egg, pickled jalapenos

or anchovies for  $1

 

Agnolotti-web

Basil & Goat Cheese Agnolotti with Summer Squash & Carrots

Secondi

lamb ragú with pappardelle & black kale   10

basil & goat cheese agnolotti with summer squash & carrots  10

crespelle with beets, chard & basil pesto  10

duck leg confit on roasted potatoes with cabbage  11

seafood curry with garbanzos, peppers & tomato   12.5

 

Dolce

chocolate brioche bread pudding with caramel sauce  6.

cardamom crème brúlée with orange shortbread   6.

 

2016 CSA – Week 2: Storing Produce

CSA Week 2 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 2


Storing Produce

Storing produce is not only important for you to make the most of your box, but it is also an essential part of our farming operation. Throughout the season and especially during fall, we will harvest large quantities of a crop that matures at the same time such as cabbage, winter squash, beets, carrots, and other root vegetables. These crops are stored in large totes, cardboard boxes, or wooden crates. Some produce does best stored just above freezing while other produce keeps best at warmer temperatures.

Proper storage is so critical for our farming operation because we often harvest more produce than we can sell immediately. Proper storage techniques help us hold our harvest so that we can sell it gradually, over time. On the farm, we have two walk in coolers where space is at a premium, especially during fall harvest. But we also have to get creative when space is limited. In the fall we convert our propagation houses into winter squash storage and the shelves in our packing shed fill up with bins of onions.

This week is all about proper produce storage so that you can make the most of your CSA. So don’t feel overwhelmed if you have more potatoes or carrots than you can eat this week. Store them properly and you can eat them several weeks from now!  The backside of the newsletter has a storage guide that we have compiled over the years. If you have any storage tips or tricks that you would like to share, we would love to hear from you!

– Lily Walton, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents:

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($4.50)

☐ Swiss Chard ($3.00) separate the stems from the leaves for cooking. Great sautéed and cooks a bit quicker than kale.

☐ Bunch Beets ($3.50) roast or boil the beats and use the greens for sautéing. Balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre with beets is a personal favorite.

☐ Arugula ($3.00) Use as a salad green, in sandwiches, pasta salad, or even make pesto!

☐ Baby Onions ($2.50) Onions with a bonus! Use the greens as you would scallions.

☐ 2 Zucchini ($1.50)

☐ Kohlrabi ($1.25) Delicious fresh or dressed in salads

☐ 2 cucumbers ($2.00)

☐ Dry Garlic ($1.50) Bend this up with some arugula or basil for fresh pesto

☐ Storage Onion ($1.50)

☐ Bunch Basil ($3.00) trim the stems and place them in a glass or jar of water, just like cut flowers. Loosely cover it with a plastic bag and leave it on the counter.

☐ 1 Siletz Tomato ($2.50)

☐ 1 Pint of peas ($4.00) great for eating fresh, in salads, or in stir-fry.

☐ Lettuce ($2.00)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $35.75

 

Storage Tips:

VEGETABLE & storage time HOW TO STORE LONG TERM STORAGE TIPS (The big four: Freezing, Canning, Pickling, Dehydrating)
GREENS AND HERBS: Tender greens last about1 week; hardy greens 2 weeks. Store wrapped in a paper towel (or a mesh greens-bag if you have one) inside of a container or bag in the fridge.  Greens with their roots still attached keep well in a bowl of water. * Many types of herbs can be dried by hanging upside down with twine in a dry, sunny place.

* Many greens can be blanched and frozen. Or, make greens-pesto and freeze it.

* Hardier greens like kale can be coated with oil, salt & pepper, and baked to make chips.

DRY ROOTS

like potatoes, onions, garlic:

1-2 months

Keep them cool and dry. Keep potatoes in the dark lest the sunshine turn them green. * Potatoes do NOT freeze well.

* Make vegetable stock! Throw in almost any veggies and herbs, bring to a boil, simmer 30 min, strain, and freeze until you need it.

FRESH ROOTS like beets, carrots, radishes, onions:
1-2 months
Break off tops so the greens don’t continue to draw sugar out of the roots. Store in a closed container in fridge. Don’t scrub or peel until you’re ready to eat them, or they will get soft faster. * Many roots make good refrigerator pickles. Slice and cover with a mixture of your favorite vinegar, a spoonful of salt and sugar, and spices (like mustard seed, dill, coriander, etc.). After about 3 weeks the flavors will start to meld.

* Slice, coat with oil and dehydrate for chips.

TOMATOES

1-2 weeks

Store at room temperature. Don’t put them in the fridge or they will get watery and weird! Keep them dry. Tomatoes are superstars for canning or dehydrating. Sauce can also be frozen, but the texture and flavor will not be quite the same.
MISCELLANEOUS VEGGIES  (broccoli, fennel, cabbage, etc.) and FRUITS (any “vegetable” with seeds inside, like zucchini, pepper, cucumber, etc.):
1-2 weeks
Most veggies like to be kept dry in the fridge with limited air exposure. DO NOT GET FRUITS WET. Plastic or glass containers are great; plastic bags are not quite as good because they limit air circulation too much.

Melons, eggplant, tomatillos, and peppers can stay at room temp a few days, but they prefer it cooler for longer storing.

* Many veggies can be blanched and frozen.

* Grate carrots or zucchini into muffins, and freeze to pull out for breakfast later.

* Refrigerator pickles (see above). Pickled peppers and cucumbers are especially popular, but there’s no reason not to get creative with veggies like broccoli, green beans or fennel!

* Make sauerkraut out of extra cabbage by slicing and keeping it immersed in salt water.

* Brush thinly-sliced veggies like squash, beets, parsnips, etc. with oil and salt. Dehydrate for chips.

* With tomatillos, make salsa verde for canning or blanch and freeze.

 

Dinner Menu for June 16-18, 2016

Antipasti

bread-olives   4.5

-duck rillette   5.5

-duck liver mousse  5.5

-pork pâté  5.5  all three 9.5

marinated grilled zucchini and kalamata olive  6.5

tomatoes – cucumbers tower 6.5

bruschetta/tomato/basil   6.5

bruschetta/duck/pickled beets/blue  6.5

GTF salad-tomato/cuke/blue cheese  7.5

roasted peppers  soup  5

zucchini &  ceci  soup  5

Pizze Rosse

garlic/basil/oregano/mozzarella    9.5

bleu/ham/onion/mozz  10.5

xxxxx/tomato/kale/mozz  10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

tomato/zukes/basil/mozz  10.5

egg/bacon/scallion/mozz 10.5

duck/kalamata/mozz   10.5

 

–add an egg or anchovies

for  2.

 

Secondi          (three course meal $29)

braised mary’s chicken breast/potatoes/zucchini/chard  17.5

duck/beets/potato/lentils/mint/thyme honey  18.5

albacore/ceci/tomato/basil/radicchio/olive aioli*  19.5

hanger  steak/smashed potato/chard/summer squash/pesto  19.5

pork chop/strata/chard/caramelized onions   18.5

sausage/belly/tongue/kale/new potatoes/carrot/turnip/salsa verde 17.5

stuffed magda squash/brown rice/new onion/baby carrot/black kale  16.5

 

To Finish

chocolate mousse/strawberry/thyme anglaise   6.5

brúlée grapefruit/buttermilk tart/caramel   6.5

angelsfood cake/marionberry/strawberry/pastry crème/chantilly  6.5

toasted almond pot de crème/almond crunch/chocolate  6.5

Fresh Spring Roots! -Recipes from May 7th

Greetings fellow foodies,

Yesterday felt like summer down at the waterfront, though our produce is still very much emanating spring. As you can see in the photo above, we are heavy on fresh new root crops, such as carrots, beets, potatoes, and Willamette Sweet Onions.

We generally cook some recipes multiple weeks in a row, during the duration of that vegetable’s prime season, so if you see something sampled without its recipe details, look back to the week it was debuted in. Yesterday over at our sample station, we cooked up the following:

  • Raw Hakurei Salad Turnips (May 1st post)
  • Pan-Fried Parsnips w/ Pea Top Salad (May 1st post)
  • Hot Beet Salad

HOT BEET SALAD:

  • 1 bunch beets
    • Beets, thinly sliced
    • Beet greens, chopped (It’s basically a free bunch of chard on top of your beets. Get your money’s worth, and eat dem greens!)
  • 1 leek, chopped
  • 1 bunch arugula, chopped (In the past, I’ve also used chard, more beet greens, or spinach. Really anything will do!)IMG_2165 (2)
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Olive oil
  • Salt

Directions:

  1. Put enough oil in the pan to coat the bottom, and bring up to heat (about medium high).
  2. Add in chopped leeks.  Sauté about 2 minutes.
    1. I’ve always composted the dark green tops of my leeks, but in recent months I decided to try chopping them right into my sauté. Much to my surprise, they were completely delicious, not too tough at all. Leeks are sold by the pound, so you might as well eat the whole thing.
  3. Add in about 3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar. Sauté leeks about 2 minutes.Our beets are so vibrant this time of year! Look closely at your food and see the beauty can be so easily overlooked. Finding joy in seemingly mundane tasks can lead to a huge quality of life increase. Check out the deep velvety rings in these beets!
  4. Add in the sliced beets, stirring around to coat in the juices. You can sprinkle in a couple pinches of salt at this time. Sauté about 3 minutes.
  5. Add in the chopped beet greens. Stir around so that they cook down enough that you have more space in the pan. Then add in the chopped arugula. Sauté just about a minute, then turn off the heat.
  6. Let the dish finish off cooking for a few minutes, then taste test. Add more salt and balsamic vinegar to taste.

IMG_2167 (2)

I’d like to insert a closing note on the big question-“To peel or not to peel.” Whenever I make this beet dish at market, one of the first questions people ask is if they have to peel their beets. We seem to have all grown up with an understanding that beets must be blanched, peeled, cooled, and given a manicure before we can cook with them. Ultimately, whether you peel or not is totally up to you, and all paths lead to tasty. But I’d like to describe how highly beneficial it can be to never peel beets, or most vegetables for that matter.

  • Higher Nutritive Value: Roots, as we all know, grow in the soil. The skins on these vegetables are the only part of the plant that’s in direct contact with the soil surface. Because of this, the skin contains a different set of vitamins and nutrients that can’t be translocated into different parts of the plant.
  • Saves Time: Before I knew much about cooking, all I knew was that there were all these steps that you had to take to make good food. I largely thank my laziness for inspiring me to cut such predispositions out of my cooking. Initially, I thought I would just cut corners and suffer the consequences. What I realized is that there are no consequences. The peels don’t end up woody, burnt, or bitter. You don’t even notice they’re there. The more steps in a recipe, the less likely we all are to actually cook it, so it can be great to simplify things.