Tag Archives: beets

Lunch Menu: Week of June 27, 2016

Seafood Curry-web

Seafood Curry

Antipasti

bread/olives  4.0

bread/ pesto  5.5

country pork pâté/mustard/cornichon  5.5

tomato/pesto/grilled pugliese 6.5

bruschetta/duck/duck 6.5

mixed field greens, balsamic vinaigrette  6.5

salad of duck breast/escarole/lentil  7.5

GTF salad–  tomato/blue/basil  10.5

gazpacho with prawn & strata crouton  6.5

zucchini and eggplant soup/ bread   4.5

 

Pizze Rosse

garlic/tomato/basil/mozz    9.5

duck/kale/mozz   10.5

mushrooms/goat chz/mozz   10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

tomato/blue/thyme/mozz  10.5

egg/bacon/scallion/mozz  10.5

ham/zukes/olives/mozz  10.5

–add an egg, pickled jalapenos

or anchovies for  $1

 

Agnolotti-web

Basil & Goat Cheese Agnolotti with Summer Squash & Carrots

Secondi

lamb ragú with pappardelle & black kale   10

basil & goat cheese agnolotti with summer squash & carrots  10

crespelle with beets, chard & basil pesto  10

duck leg confit on roasted potatoes with cabbage  11

seafood curry with garbanzos, peppers & tomato   12.5

 

Dolce

chocolate brioche bread pudding with caramel sauce  6.

cardamom crème brúlée with orange shortbread   6.

 

2016 CSA – Week 2: Storing Produce

CSA Week 2 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 2


Storing Produce

Storing produce is not only important for you to make the most of your box, but it is also an essential part of our farming operation. Throughout the season and especially during fall, we will harvest large quantities of a crop that matures at the same time such as cabbage, winter squash, beets, carrots, and other root vegetables. These crops are stored in large totes, cardboard boxes, or wooden crates. Some produce does best stored just above freezing while other produce keeps best at warmer temperatures.

Proper storage is so critical for our farming operation because we often harvest more produce than we can sell immediately. Proper storage techniques help us hold our harvest so that we can sell it gradually, over time. On the farm, we have two walk in coolers where space is at a premium, especially during fall harvest. But we also have to get creative when space is limited. In the fall we convert our propagation houses into winter squash storage and the shelves in our packing shed fill up with bins of onions.

This week is all about proper produce storage so that you can make the most of your CSA. So don’t feel overwhelmed if you have more potatoes or carrots than you can eat this week. Store them properly and you can eat them several weeks from now!  The backside of the newsletter has a storage guide that we have compiled over the years. If you have any storage tips or tricks that you would like to share, we would love to hear from you!

– Lily Walton, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents:

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($4.50)

☐ Swiss Chard ($3.00) separate the stems from the leaves for cooking. Great sautéed and cooks a bit quicker than kale.

☐ Bunch Beets ($3.50) roast or boil the beats and use the greens for sautéing. Balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre with beets is a personal favorite.

☐ Arugula ($3.00) Use as a salad green, in sandwiches, pasta salad, or even make pesto!

☐ Baby Onions ($2.50) Onions with a bonus! Use the greens as you would scallions.

☐ 2 Zucchini ($1.50)

☐ Kohlrabi ($1.25) Delicious fresh or dressed in salads

☐ 2 cucumbers ($2.00)

☐ Dry Garlic ($1.50) Bend this up with some arugula or basil for fresh pesto

☐ Storage Onion ($1.50)

☐ Bunch Basil ($3.00) trim the stems and place them in a glass or jar of water, just like cut flowers. Loosely cover it with a plastic bag and leave it on the counter.

☐ 1 Siletz Tomato ($2.50)

☐ 1 Pint of peas ($4.00) great for eating fresh, in salads, or in stir-fry.

☐ Lettuce ($2.00)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $35.75

 

Storage Tips:

VEGETABLE & storage time HOW TO STORE LONG TERM STORAGE TIPS (The big four: Freezing, Canning, Pickling, Dehydrating)
GREENS AND HERBS: Tender greens last about1 week; hardy greens 2 weeks. Store wrapped in a paper towel (or a mesh greens-bag if you have one) inside of a container or bag in the fridge.  Greens with their roots still attached keep well in a bowl of water. * Many types of herbs can be dried by hanging upside down with twine in a dry, sunny place.

* Many greens can be blanched and frozen. Or, make greens-pesto and freeze it.

* Hardier greens like kale can be coated with oil, salt & pepper, and baked to make chips.

DRY ROOTS

like potatoes, onions, garlic:

1-2 months

Keep them cool and dry. Keep potatoes in the dark lest the sunshine turn them green. * Potatoes do NOT freeze well.

* Make vegetable stock! Throw in almost any veggies and herbs, bring to a boil, simmer 30 min, strain, and freeze until you need it.

FRESH ROOTS like beets, carrots, radishes, onions:
1-2 months
Break off tops so the greens don’t continue to draw sugar out of the roots. Store in a closed container in fridge. Don’t scrub or peel until you’re ready to eat them, or they will get soft faster. * Many roots make good refrigerator pickles. Slice and cover with a mixture of your favorite vinegar, a spoonful of salt and sugar, and spices (like mustard seed, dill, coriander, etc.). After about 3 weeks the flavors will start to meld.

* Slice, coat with oil and dehydrate for chips.

TOMATOES

1-2 weeks

Store at room temperature. Don’t put them in the fridge or they will get watery and weird! Keep them dry. Tomatoes are superstars for canning or dehydrating. Sauce can also be frozen, but the texture and flavor will not be quite the same.
MISCELLANEOUS VEGGIES  (broccoli, fennel, cabbage, etc.) and FRUITS (any “vegetable” with seeds inside, like zucchini, pepper, cucumber, etc.):
1-2 weeks
Most veggies like to be kept dry in the fridge with limited air exposure. DO NOT GET FRUITS WET. Plastic or glass containers are great; plastic bags are not quite as good because they limit air circulation too much.

Melons, eggplant, tomatillos, and peppers can stay at room temp a few days, but they prefer it cooler for longer storing.

* Many veggies can be blanched and frozen.

* Grate carrots or zucchini into muffins, and freeze to pull out for breakfast later.

* Refrigerator pickles (see above). Pickled peppers and cucumbers are especially popular, but there’s no reason not to get creative with veggies like broccoli, green beans or fennel!

* Make sauerkraut out of extra cabbage by slicing and keeping it immersed in salt water.

* Brush thinly-sliced veggies like squash, beets, parsnips, etc. with oil and salt. Dehydrate for chips.

* With tomatillos, make salsa verde for canning or blanch and freeze.

 

Dinner Menu for June 16-18, 2016

Antipasti

bread-olives   4.5

-duck rillette   5.5

-duck liver mousse  5.5

-pork pâté  5.5  all three 9.5

marinated grilled zucchini and kalamata olive  6.5

tomatoes – cucumbers tower 6.5

bruschetta/tomato/basil   6.5

bruschetta/duck/pickled beets/blue  6.5

GTF salad-tomato/cuke/blue cheese  7.5

roasted peppers  soup  5

zucchini &  ceci  soup  5

Pizze Rosse

garlic/basil/oregano/mozzarella    9.5

bleu/ham/onion/mozz  10.5

xxxxx/tomato/kale/mozz  10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

tomato/zukes/basil/mozz  10.5

egg/bacon/scallion/mozz 10.5

duck/kalamata/mozz   10.5

 

–add an egg or anchovies

for  2.

 

Secondi          (three course meal $29)

braised mary’s chicken breast/potatoes/zucchini/chard  17.5

duck/beets/potato/lentils/mint/thyme honey  18.5

albacore/ceci/tomato/basil/radicchio/olive aioli*  19.5

hanger  steak/smashed potato/chard/summer squash/pesto  19.5

pork chop/strata/chard/caramelized onions   18.5

sausage/belly/tongue/kale/new potatoes/carrot/turnip/salsa verde 17.5

stuffed magda squash/brown rice/new onion/baby carrot/black kale  16.5

 

To Finish

chocolate mousse/strawberry/thyme anglaise   6.5

brúlée grapefruit/buttermilk tart/caramel   6.5

angelsfood cake/marionberry/strawberry/pastry crème/chantilly  6.5

toasted almond pot de crème/almond crunch/chocolate  6.5

Fresh Spring Roots! -Recipes from May 7th

Greetings fellow foodies,

Yesterday felt like summer down at the waterfront, though our produce is still very much emanating spring. As you can see in the photo above, we are heavy on fresh new root crops, such as carrots, beets, potatoes, and Willamette Sweet Onions.

We generally cook some recipes multiple weeks in a row, during the duration of that vegetable’s prime season, so if you see something sampled without its recipe details, look back to the week it was debuted in. Yesterday over at our sample station, we cooked up the following:

  • Raw Hakurei Salad Turnips (May 1st post)
  • Pan-Fried Parsnips w/ Pea Top Salad (May 1st post)
  • Hot Beet Salad

HOT BEET SALAD:

  • 1 bunch beets
    • Beets, thinly sliced
    • Beet greens, chopped (It’s basically a free bunch of chard on top of your beets. Get your money’s worth, and eat dem greens!)
  • 1 leek, chopped
  • 1 bunch arugula, chopped (In the past, I’ve also used chard, more beet greens, or spinach. Really anything will do!)IMG_2165 (2)
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Olive oil
  • Salt

Directions:

  1. Put enough oil in the pan to coat the bottom, and bring up to heat (about medium high).
  2. Add in chopped leeks.  Sauté about 2 minutes.
    1. I’ve always composted the dark green tops of my leeks, but in recent months I decided to try chopping them right into my sauté. Much to my surprise, they were completely delicious, not too tough at all. Leeks are sold by the pound, so you might as well eat the whole thing.
  3. Add in about 3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar. Sauté leeks about 2 minutes.Our beets are so vibrant this time of year! Look closely at your food and see the beauty can be so easily overlooked. Finding joy in seemingly mundane tasks can lead to a huge quality of life increase. Check out the deep velvety rings in these beets!
  4. Add in the sliced beets, stirring around to coat in the juices. You can sprinkle in a couple pinches of salt at this time. Sauté about 3 minutes.
  5. Add in the chopped beet greens. Stir around so that they cook down enough that you have more space in the pan. Then add in the chopped arugula. Sauté just about a minute, then turn off the heat.
  6. Let the dish finish off cooking for a few minutes, then taste test. Add more salt and balsamic vinegar to taste.

IMG_2167 (2)

I’d like to insert a closing note on the big question-“To peel or not to peel.” Whenever I make this beet dish at market, one of the first questions people ask is if they have to peel their beets. We seem to have all grown up with an understanding that beets must be blanched, peeled, cooled, and given a manicure before we can cook with them. Ultimately, whether you peel or not is totally up to you, and all paths lead to tasty. But I’d like to describe how highly beneficial it can be to never peel beets, or most vegetables for that matter.

  • Higher Nutritive Value: Roots, as we all know, grow in the soil. The skins on these vegetables are the only part of the plant that’s in direct contact with the soil surface. Because of this, the skin contains a different set of vitamins and nutrients that can’t be translocated into different parts of the plant.
  • Saves Time: Before I knew much about cooking, all I knew was that there were all these steps that you had to take to make good food. I largely thank my laziness for inspiring me to cut such predispositions out of my cooking. Initially, I thought I would just cut corners and suffer the consequences. What I realized is that there are no consequences. The peels don’t end up woody, burnt, or bitter. You don’t even notice they’re there. The more steps in a recipe, the less likely we all are to actually cook it, so it can be great to simplify things.

CSA 2011 – Week 20: This Land is Your Land

As many of you know, we have added on small chunks of land here and there for the past few years now. One of our newest additions is right across the street from our main production greenhouse. This past spring, the owners of the property had the hybrid tulip poplars removed and we transplanted our fall brassicas into the field in July. Those brassicas are now thriving and that is where your past few week’s of kales and collards were planted.

This next year is going to be a whole new story for us. We are taking over the lease of a 70– acre plot of land formerly farmed by a transitional organic grain farmer. Much of this land is 3 years away from being certified organic, so we are coming up with what to do with it until then. For now, Dan and John are in the process of moving the whole compost operation and equipment over there right now. We may lease some of the land to livestock raising, or maybe grow some transitional organic sweet corn there.

The main goal and excitement behind this huge chunk of land is not to actually grow more vegetables, but to be able to give large parcels of land a rest. We could then grow cover crops for longer, while cutting disease pressure at the same time. This is still in the works, but there’s no doubt it leaves a lot of possibilities for the future at GTF.

Parsnip Puree
1 pound parsnips, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces.
2-3 medium baked potatoes
1/2 cup cream or sour cream
4 tablespoons butter, softened
1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger (optional)
Pinch nutmeg
Salt and pepper to taste

Cook parsnips in boiling salted water about 20 minutes or until tender. Drain and puree in a food processor along with scooped out potato flesh. Add cream, butter and ginger and process until well blended. Season to taste. *Parsnips have a wonderful sweet flavor, and go great with carrots too. Try using them in soup, or roasted!

Squash Towels! Have any old large bath towels laying around the house that need a new home? Bring them down to GTF! We have been enjoying a wonderful squash washing season and are in need of old towel donations for drying them. We’ll gladly take them off your hands!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Red Potatoes (Colorado rose or Rose gold) – Steam, roast, fry, mash, these are versatile.

Carrots, bulk (~1 lb) – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

3 onions (2 yellow, 1 red)– Caramelize, eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad.

1 bunch beets– Cut beets off greens. Boil, roast or fry beets. Try grating them raw. Use the greens too! Sautee with olive oil or butter, salt, and pepper.

1 ambercup squash– Cut in half, remove seeds, place on a sheet pan, flesh side down. You may oil the pan a bit so it does not stick. Add a couple cups of water too, so the squash steams slightly. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes-1 hour. You can use this squash in place of pumpkin in any recipe, or make a soup with it! Ambercup tends to be a bit on the dry side so it may need more moisture.

Bok Choy– Sauté in butter or olive oil and salt. It goes great with fish. Add chile flakes for a kick.

1 red Italian pepper, 1 red bell—Grill, roast, or just eat raw; they are sweet.

2 Leeks– Use in soups or sautés. Chop them, then rinse them a bit. Dirt gets inside leek layers easily.

Parsnip-Chop into small pieces and use in soups or roast with other vegetables.

1 tomato– Chop and put in soup or salad. Add to sandwiches or wraps.

Balsamic Carrot Salad
1 pound carrots, peeled and julienne small (thinly sliced pieces)
2-3 celery stalks, chopped fine
2 red peppers, seeded and cut into small slices
2 bunches green onions, chopped
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
1 1/2 cups balsamic dressing

For the dressing:
2 teaspoons Dijon-type mustard
1/4 cup plus 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
1 cup extra virgin olive oil

Mix the mustard and vinegar. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil while whisking or mixing the vinegar. Add salt and honey to taste.

For the salad, combine all the ingredients and serve. You may use grated kohlrabi in place of the celery. Try adding some finely chopped red onion, or grated beets!

Beet Soup
6 medium beets
4 tablespoons butter
1 quart filtered water
Sea salt or fish sauce and pepper
2 tablespoons finely chopped green onions or parsley for garnish
crème fraiche or sour cream

Peel beets, chop coarsely and sauté very gently in butter for about 1/2 hour or until tender. Add water, bring to a boil and skim. Simmer about 15 minutes. Puree soup with a handheld blender, or food processor. Season to taste. Garnish with chopped green onions and sour cream or creme fraiche.

Ambercup Leek Soup
1 ambercup squash
2 leeks
2 tablespoons butter
6 cups water, or stock
1 cup milk or cream
Salt and pepper

Chop the leeks into small slices. Heat a large pot up with the butter. Once the butter is melted, add the leeks. Meanwhile, cut the rind off of the squash; either a knife or a peeler may work. Cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Cut the squash up into 1-inch size cubes. Once the leeks are soft and cooked, add the squash and continue cooking for another 15 minutes or so. Add the water/ stock and milk. Bring to a boil and then turn down to low and cover. Simmer for about 30 minutes or until the squash is cooked all the way. Puree with a handheld or standup blender. Season to taste and serve.