November 12th Market Recipes ft. Fioretto Cauliflower

A big thanks to everyone who made it down to market this week! Our Corvallis and Beaverton outdoor markets will only have one more Saturday left in the season until next spring, so make sure to take advantage before winter. Being in customer service at a farmers’ market in Oregon has been heavy this past week to say the least. I hope we can all seek comfort in the bounty of our local farms, sharing good food with our friends and family. We are perennial, and even if we lose our leaves, the frost will not be fatal. Here are some cozy fall recipes to warm you up, straight from our sample station at the Corvallis Farmers’ Market.img_3162-2

  • Braised Fioretto Cauliflower
  • Kabocha Squash with Medusa Red Kale
  • Celeriac with Lacinato Black Kale

*Note: Any time that you find your sauté pan dry in the middle of the cooking process, add more oil! Fats get a bad rap these days, but being liberal with olive oil in a vegetable sauté probably never harmed anyone.

Braised Fioretto Cauliflower

Broccoli has a well-known cousin named broccoli raab, a non-heading variety with its own unique flavor and texture. Cauliflower turns out to have a cousin of its own called Fioretto Cauliflower Sticks. At first glance, they sort of look like broccoli raab that’s been sitting around one too many weeks, but do not be perturbed by their pale color. img_3187-3-700-pixels-wideToday was my first day tasting these conspicuous florets, and I was surprised how delicious they were. They have a much sweeter taste than cauliflower, with a smooth, fresh texture. Though I ended up sautéing them at market, I firmly believe they are destined for the grill!

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 2 bu. Fioretto cauliflower sticks
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Chop off the very bottom of the cauliflower sticks while they’re still in a bunch. Then, slice the larger sprigs lengthwise and keep the smaller sprigs as is.
    • Heat up olive oil in your pan to medium high. Add in the cauliflower sticks, and let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Remove lid, add in a pinch or two of salt, and continue to cook uncovered until tender another 2-5 minutes, depending on desired crispness.
    • Serve as is, just like asparagus!

Kabocha Squash with Medusa Red Kaleimg_3184-2

Kabocha and other large squashes lend themselves to easy baking, but being limited to a frying pan at market forces me to cook in creative ways. Trust me, if you stir fry kabocha once, you might never go back. Kabocha is a dry yet intensely flavorful squash, with the sweet and savory flavor similar to a roasted chestnut. Cooking it in the frying pan takes hardly ten minutes, as there is very little water to cook out, and you end up with bites of creamy squash encased within crisp edges.20161113_113149

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • ½ Kabocha squash, sliced thin
    • 2 large shallots, finely chopped
    • ½ head garlic (Goodfoot Farm)
    • ½ bu. Medusa red kale
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Cutting up the big kabocha squash while it’s raw is the hardest part of this recipe. Be safe, take your time, and don’t chop your fingers off however tempting it may be. Follow the chopping tutorial at right, and set aside.
    • Finely chop your shallots.
    • Heat a pan of olive oil up to medium-high temp and add in the shallots, letting cook 2-4 minutes.
    • Add in the kabocha squash slices and stir around. Let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop garlic and add into the pan, continuing to cook uncovered another 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop up ½ bunch of Medusa red kale and add it into the pan along with 2-3 pinches of salt, stirring around to distribute evenly. Let cook another 2-3 minutes until done to taste, but before the kabocha turns to mush! It’s a race against time, but it’ll always turn out delicious.

Celeriac with Lacinato Black Kaleimg_3191-2

I fondly refer to celeriac as “instant chicken soup,” as celery is a common ingredient in chicken soup and celeriac tastes like a savory version of celery. And let’s get real, nobody walks up to a celeriac and says, “oh boy, does that look delicious,” unless they’re being sarcastic. But if you can make it past their gnarly exterior, you will make your way to a wonderfully sweet and savory treasure.20161113_113253

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 1 celeriac (celery root), sliced thin
    • 1 bu. Lacinato black kale
    • 2 large shallots
    • ½ head garlic (Goodfoot Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • To cut into a celeriac, I first slice off the top and then set it flat-side-down on the cutting board. Then, I take my knife and carefully shave off the skin, including all the gnarled root hairs. You’re left with a chunk of soft white root, which you can then cut into thin slices, as seen in the chopping tutorial at right. Set aside.
    • Finely chop your shallots.
    • Heat a pan of olive oil up to medium-high temp and add in the shallots, letting cook 2-4 minutes.
    • Add in the celeriac slices and stir around. Let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop garlic and add into the pan, continuing to cook uncovered another 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop up ½ bunch of Lacinato black kale and add it into the pan along with 2-3 pinches of salt, stirring around to distribute evenly. Let cook another 2-3 minutes until done to taste.
    • This sauté is delicious on its own, and on occasion when I accidentally overcook the celeriac and it becomes mushy, I’ll just puree the whole thing with cream to make a quick hearty soup with amazing flavor.

 

June 25th Market Recipes – Spinach Basil Salad and Fresh Pico de Gallo

Summer is officially here, and with it has come another slew of seasonal produce. It’s now that time of year when a few quick chops is all that stands between you and a meal of simple fresh food. The following recipes focus on quick raw dishes that can be enjoyed without turning on the stove, although I did break down and cook up some zucchini, I just missed it so much all winter.

  • Fresh Cucumber with Lemon and Salt20160622_090504 (2) 700 pixels wide
  • Fresh Kohlrabi with Lemon and Salt (June 4th post)
  • Cocozelle Squash Sauté with Black Kale and Garlic
  • Spinach Basil Salad
  • Pico de Gallo

FRESH CUCUMBER WITH LEMON AND SALT:

Cucumber season is in full swing! Eat them whole like an apple, slice them up with lemon and salt, mince them into a salad- cucumbers are good for everything.

COCOZELLE SQUASH SAUTE WITH BLACK KALE AND GARLIC:20160625_104941 (2)

Summer squash and garlic are soul mates, and when they are together, deliciousness is sure to result. Many people asked me, “One head of garlic? You must mean 1 clove?” No sir, no ma’am, I mean one head! Though garlic is most commonly treated as a seasoning, I prefer to treat it as a vegetable as it provides a savory flavor that makes vegetarian dishes feel especially filling. Feel free to add as much as or as little as you wish! I used Cocozelle in this dish, a type of zucchini that has thicker skin which helps the squash maintain its form without getting mushy in the pan.

  • 3 Cocozelle Summer Squash, sliced into discs
  • 1/2 Willamette Sweet Onion, finely chopped
  • 1 head Garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch Lacinato Black Kale, roughly chopped
  • Olive oil
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Coat the bottom of the pan in olive oil and bring it up to medium-high heat.
  2. Once up to temperature, add in the chopped onion and cook for 2 minutes.
  3. Add in sliced squash and garlic, stirring around to coat everything in oil. Sauté for about 7 minutes.
  4. Stir in the black kale and add a couple pinches of salt. Sauté for about 3 minutes. Timing is somewhat key here, as we don’t want the squash to get mushy. Make sure to add in the kale while the squash is still a little bit raw so that both the kale and the squash finish cooking about the same time in the pan.
  5. My favorite way to eat this dish is for breakfast topped with two fried eggs and some hot sauce. However it is also delicious along side rice and chicken, or just by itself.

SPINACH BASIL SALAD:20160625_104933 (2)

Spinach is not the biggest fan of hot weather, so I made this dish in an effort to enjoy it in its prime before we all have to go a month or two without its tender greens in our lives.

  • 1 bunch Spinach, roughly chopped
  • 2/3 bunch Basil, finely chopped
  • ~6 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • ~4 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/4 Willamette Sweet Onion, minced
  • Salt to taste, 2-3 pinches

Directions:

  1. Mince the garlic and onion and place them in a medium bowl.
  2. Pour the olive oil, salt, and balsamic vinegar into the bowl, and mash the onion and garlic into the dressing a bit with the back of a spoon. This is the magic secret! All those onion and garlic juices will release into your dressing making it incredibly flavorful.
  3. Chop up the spinach and basil and toss them in the dressing.
  4. This salad is delicious as is, although if you let it sit 10-15 minutes before serving, the vinegar will break down the spinach a bit making for an extremely tender salad.

PICO DE GALLO:20160625_115024 (2)

Pico de Gallo is one of my main dinners during the summer. All you have to do is roughly chop up the following ingredients, dump them all in a bowl, and mix them around. Serve with tortilla chips, on top of tacos, or if you’re crazy like me, grab a spoon and experience just how fresh summer can taste. You’ll notice from this picture that I like my pico with heavy quantities of onion; for those of you who prefer less onion, feel free to add less.

  • 4 medium Tomatoes
  • 1 medium-large Willamette Sweet Onion
  • 2-3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro
  • 1/3 bunch Basil
  • Lemon Juice to taste
  • Salt to taste

Final Lunch Menu of 2014: November 11-15

Here is a solid start to the menu for this week, with a few details to work out tomorrow before service!

To Start
salumi plate with cornichon, olives and house mustard and brie cheese 8.5
mixed field greens with balsamic vinaigrette 6.5
GTF salad –flank steak, roasted delicata, blue cheese and parsley vinaigrette 9.5
creamy celeriac soup with bacon, curried apples & artisan bread 4/6
soup with artisan bread 4/6

Pizze Rosso
garlic/oregano/mozzarella 9.5
lamb sausage/kalamata/mozzarella 10.5
octopus/bacon/kale/mozzarella 10.

Pizze Bianco
ham/butternut/mozzarella 10.5
delicata/red onion/blue cheese/mozzarella 10.
sweetbreads/egg/parmesan/leeks 10.

–add an egg or anchovies for a dollar

Secondi
semolina gnocchi with butternut squash, leeks and brie cheese 9.5
roasted pepper gratinata with……………. romesco 9.5
ragú misto with black kale, creamy polenta & fried egg 10
garlic sausage on GTF sauerkraut and Lonesome Whistle purple barley 10

Thicker than Water?

Monday the 21st was summer solstice, the first day of summer, and the longest day of the year. It seems hard to believe because it just doesn’t feel like it should be the end of June.  I checked out the official NOAA website and they confirmed what we can all feel, precipitation totals are well above normal. All this wet has me thinking about how much of our bodies, and how much of what we consume is water. We know that drinking contaminated water (even in small amounts) can have lasting harmful or deadly effects on humans. Our bodies are largely water, and so are many of the foods that we eat. It seems that we often  deceive ourselves into thinking that we are something stronger or greater than our chemical components. I wonder why we are not more cautious overall about the purity of all the water that surrounds us, because it directly feeds the seeds that will become us.

In your box this week, you have Cucumbers (95% water),  Carrots (84%  water) Lettuce (96% water) and strawberries (90% water), and a handful of other water dense vegetables…You’ll take these home to eat, and they will become a part of the water that makes up 60 % your body, and 83% of your blood. These vegetables are fed by the soil, air and water. Soil itself is 25% water the (rest is composed of 45% mineral material, 5% organic material, and 25% air) . We can greatly alter how a plant grows by boosting the minerals in the soil by using fertilizers, mainly nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. It makes sense that people would need a type of fertilizer to grow also, but we don’t because we get everything we need from the plants we eat, and plants take everything in from their environment. Plants do all of the work to process the basic elements of life and make them available to us. But what about when our plants are feeding from an environment that has lingering chemicals left by pesticides or herbicides?

Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the USA; but you may recognize it by its other name, Roundup. While it’s claimed that Roundup becomes inactive quickly in the soil, a study in the Ecologist found that it is more accurate to say that it is usually absorbed into the different components in the soil (water, mineral, organic, and air). That means it’s still active. So active that glyphosate residues have been found in lettuce, carrots, and barley that were planted a year after the field was treated. A different article in the journal, Environmental Pollution, showed that glyphosate also leaches through the soils; so the molecules may be potential contaminants of groundwater.

This brings us back to the idea of water purity. Now I know I’m preaching to the converted, but even if you go out of your way to eat organic produce, if your neighbor, or farmer across town uses a glyphosate based herbicide, the odds are it will slowly make its way into our soil and groundwater. When you eat vegetables that have grown from soil & water that have been exposed, do we really have any idea what the long term effects are?

Naturalist John Muir once said,  “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe”.  And that seems to be the case with the water system. Maybe the unusual amount of rain we are having this year is connected to a greater issue. Either way, the water that keeps falling down on us is the same water that keeps your cucumber crunchy, it’s the same water that is rising out of the ground, and running into our rivers; it’s the same water that is circulating through your body.  Nothing is separate from everything else, and we ourselves are, no thicker than water.

Devon Sanders, CSA Coordinator

What’s in the box?

Fingerling Potatoes— 4.50$ (these are real gems, bake and enjoy with butter.)

Garlic Scapes—2.00$ (see recipe)

Fava Beans—3.00$(see recipe)

Basil—2.00$

Black Kale—2.00$

Cucumber—1.50$

Carrots—3.00$

Lettuce—2.00$

Walla Walla Onion—1.50$

Radishes—2.25$

Strawberries—3.00$

If you were shopping at the market, this box would cost—26.75$

Recipe Suggestions

Garlic Scape Pesto

1 bunch garlic scapes
1 tablespoon of  lemon juice
1/4 cup parmesan cheese, grated
enough extra virgin olive oil to blend smoothly
coarse salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:
Blend garlic scapes, parmesan cheese, and lemon juice in a food processor or blender. Slowly drizzle in the oil with the motor running, and blend until smooth. Add a little more oil if you like yours a little looser, Taste and add coarse salt and pepper as needed. Mix this into your pasta,  use for a dip, or spread.

Fava Beans

Fava beans have a delicious buttery texture and lovely nutty taste. Although the require a bit more work to prepare, take the time to try this old world favorite. When preparing fava beans you need to first remove the beans from the pod. After you have shucked your beans, dispose of the pods and start a pan of water boiling so that you can partially boil the beans to make removal of the outer shell easier. Fava beans have a outer shell that needs to be removed before you eat them. Boil the beans until they turn bright green (about a minute or so), then remove them, run them under cold water until they are cool enough to touch. Now you need to remove the skin surrounding each bean. Fava beans have what looks like a little seam on one side of the bean. Make a slit in the seam at one end of the bean and then squeeze the bean out. It should pop right out of the skin.  Then the beans are ready to use in any recipe.

1.5 cups shelled fava beans (roughly 1.5 pounds unshelled)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 clove of garlic chopped finely
salt & pepper to taste

In a skillet on medium heat, add oil and garlic and let cook for 1-2 minutes. Add fava beans and sautee for 7– 10 minutes, or until they are done to your preference. Add salt and pepper to taste, and these beans are ready to eat!           Good ideas include an Italian inspired cold salad with goat cheese, olive oil, lemon juice , and parsley.

Or throw your cooked beans in a food processor with lemon, garlic, and olive oil and spread them on a piece of toasted French bread. Yummy!

Black Kale Salad

1 bunch of black kale
Several baby onions, thinly sliced
A handful of pitted kalamata olives, chopped or ripped into quarters
1/4 cup of feta cheese
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons of grey poupon mustard
Salt and pepper to taste

Wash your kale and remove the bottom stalk.  Chop the rest into 1 inch sections and put into a large bowl.  Chop onions and kalamata olives and add to the kale.  In a separate bowl mix or whisk the mustard and olive oil together until they are emulsified, pour mixture over the kale, olives and onions.  Coat kale leaves completely with the dressing,  then and add feta cheese, and salt and pepper to taste.

This salad is best when you make it in at least 6 hours in advance, so that as the kale wilts, it absorbs the dressing. This makes it more tender and easier to eat.