October 8th Market Recipes ft. Hakurei Turnips

This Saturday was one of my favorite markets of the season. It was a perfect autumnal Oregon day, complete with a misty morning and a beautiful sunny afternoon. Tis the season of cool days and warm sautés. This week I’m throwing in some photos of our market booth at the end of the recipes, everything was just too beautiful not to share. Happy cooking everyone! img_2948-2

  • Kohlrabi, raw (June 4th post)
  • Watermelon Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Black Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Hakurei Turnip: Raw & Tamari Stir Fry
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéed

RECIPES:

  • Hakurei Turnip Tamari Stir Fry
    • For those of you who had the luxury of tasting these sweet treats in the spring, the rumors are true, Hakurei turnips are back in season. Raw, these turnips are soft and sweet and pure with fall magic. They can be eaten like an apple, added to a salad, or my favorite- used as a vehicle for dip. If you can stop munching them raw for a moment and use them in a stir fry, they are extremely satiating. There is no reason to not utilize the entire plant in the stir fry- the roots, stems, and leaves are all delicious and add to the meal.img_2947-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 2 bunches Hakurei Turnips
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head Garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive Oil
      • Tamari
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic and set both aside.
      • Remove the tails and tops from the Hakurei turnips, cut them in half, and then slice them thin.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in 3-5 Tbsp of tamari and let cook another minute, allowing the tamari to reduce ever so slightly.
      • Add in your Hakurei turnips and the garlic at this point. Adding garlic later in the cooking process preserves its flavor, which you definitely want when you’ve spent the time to peel and mince. Let cook about 3 minutes.
      • Roughly chop the turnip greens and stems and add them into the sauté. Add another splash of tamari  and a pinch or two of salt and let cook 1-2 minutes.
      • Turn off the pan and add more salt and tamari to taste if needed. Serve as is or over rice.
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
    • This amazing dish can only be enjoyed in a small window of time when we still have summer peppers hanging on despite winter squash encroaching on our market shelves. It was a favorite last year at market and continues to be one of mine, as the smoky poblano flavor compliments the creamy sweet delicata so well.
    • INGREDIENTS:img_2958-2
      • 1 Delicata squash, sliced into half-moons
      • 3-4 Poblano peppers, sliced thinly
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Cut the ends off your delicata squash to make a flat surface, then stand it on end and slice it in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to remove the seeds. Make thin half-moon slices down the delicata. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the sliced delicata and let cook covered about 4-6 minutes.
      • Chop the poblanos in half and rip out the seeds and stem (make sure to wash your hands after touching the spicy seeds). Chop each half into thin slices.
      • Add the poblanos, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
      • Let cook a couple more minutes to desired softness. Add more salt to taste, and enjoy! Customers last year said this dish was a hit at Thanksgiving.
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéedimg_2954-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 1 head Broccoli, broken into pieces
      • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
      • 2-3 Carrots, sliced into discs
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the broccoli and romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
      • Slice up a few carrots just to add some color to the green sauté. Add them into pan along with garlic and 1-2 pinches salt. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the broccoli and romanesco are cooked but still have some crunch.
      • Enjoy!

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Potato Varieties from left to right: Mountain Rose, Nicola, Rose Apple Finn Red Fingerlings, Purple Majesty, French Yellow Fingerlings

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2016 CSA – Week 16: Root Cellar Farm Style

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CSA Newsletter – Week 16


Root Cellar Farm Style

It’s also that time of year that our coolers start to fill up with bins (25 to 60 ft2 ) of cabbage, carrots, potatoes, and beets. Soon, they will be joined by bins of parsnips, sunchokes, salsify, scorzanera, burdock, celeriac, and parsley root.

We have two walk-in coolers on the farm that we do store some of these root crops in, however, these coolers also hold all of the refrigerated produce that we send to market, all of the restaurant orders before they are delivered, and some CSA boxes too! Needless to say, it starts to get cozy in the coolers around this time of year.

We also have a shipping container that is modified to be a cold storage unit. It has a refrigeration system hooked up to it, and it is insulated with straw bales on the top and sides. We are able to store up to 36 bins of storage crops in this space but it is still not enough! As a result, throughout the season we store up to 60 bins of various crops every season at a cold storage facility nearby.

Root crops that are stored at their optimum temperature can last through the winter; on a small scale you would use a root cellar. We wash or clean one bin at a time and with so much variety, it is very important that we are able to keep the additional harvest fresh until it is ready to be washed and enjoyed.

Thanks in part to cold storage techniques, we are able to have a larger variety of produce in the winter months for folks like you and me to enjoy!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Try them sautéed with kale, see recipe.

☐  1 Buttercup Squash ($4.00) – Buttercup squash has a smooth, dry texture and a lightly nutty flavor. It is delicious any way you cook it. Halved and baked, cubed or sliced and roasted, or in pie!

☐  2 Colored Peppers ($2.00)

☐  Bunch Radishes ($2.50) – Radishes are delicious raw in salads but they are equally delicious cooked. Try the recipe for braised radishes with shallots.

  Lacinato Kale ($3.00) – Fall kale is a bit bitter before the frost so I prefer to sauté or blanch it before eating.

  2 Dried Yellow Onions ($1.25)

  1 Dried Shallot ($1.00) – Shallots taste somewhere between garlic and onion and are delicious raw in salads as well as caramelized with just about anything.

☐  Broccoli ($3.50)

☐  4 Ears Corn ($4.00) – If you don’t eat the corn straight off the cob, try making grilled corn guacamole. See recipe.

☐   ̴ 1 lb Big Beef Tomatoes ($3.00)

 Box Market Value: $28.50
Recipes

Grilled Corn Guacamole

  • 3 ears Corn, Shucked
  • 6 whole Avocados, Diced
  • 1 whole Large Tomato, Diced
  • 1/3 cup Onion, Finely Diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, Finely Minced
  • 2 Tablespoons Diced Fresh Jalapeno
  • 1 whole Lime, Juiced
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kosher Salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Ground Cumin
  • 1/2 cup Cilantro Leaves

Preparation

  1. Grill corn until nice and golden, with good grill marks on the kernels. Allow to cool a bit, then cut the kernels off the cobs. Set aside.
  2. Halve avocados and remove pit. Cut avocado into a dice inside the skin, then scoop out with a spoon.
  3. In a bowl, combine corn kernels, diced avocados, diced tomato, jalapenos, minced garlic, lime juice, salt, and cumin. Stir gently to combine. Add cilantro and stir in.

Read More: The Pioneer Woman

 

Radishes Braised with Shallots and Vinegar

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 slices bacon, diced
  • 2 large shallots, finely sliced
  • 1 pound radishes, about 2 bunches, tops trimmed and radishes sliced in half
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2/3 cup finely chopped Italian parsley
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 Preparation

  1. Heat the butter and bacon over medium-high heat in a wide, heavy skillet — preferably cast iron. Cook for about 5 minutes. When the bacon is cooked through and getting crispy, place the radishes cut-side down in the pan and cook undisturbed for 2 to 3 minutes or until the bottoms begin to brown. Add the shallots and cook, stirring, for another minute.
  2. Add the balsamic vinegar and the water — the water should just come up around the sides of the radishes. Cover, lower the heat, and simmer for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the radishes are tender.
  3. Remove the lid and continue to simmer for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the liquid has reduced into a syrupy sauce. Add the the parsley and stir to wilt.
  4. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Read More: The Kitchn

 

Sautéed Potatoes with Black Kale and Nigella

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch black kale (about 1/2 pound), stemmed, leaves washed in 2 changes water
  • Salt
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 ½ pounds potatoes, such as yellow potatoes or Yukon golds, cut in small dice (about ½ inch)
  • 1 teaspoon nigella seeds
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 2 shallots, minced

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. When water comes to a boil, salt generously and add kale. Blanch 2 to 3 minutes, until just tender. Transfer to a bowl of cold water, drain and squeeze out excess water. Cut squeezed bunches of kale into slivers and set aside.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over high heat in a heavy, preferably nonstick, 12-inch skillet and add potatoes. Turn heat down to medium-high and sear without stirring for 5 minutes, then shake and toss in pan for another 5 to 8 minutes, or until just tender and lightly browned. Add salt and continue to toss in pan for another minute or two, until tender. Add remaining teaspoon oil, shallots and nigella seeds and cook, stirring until shallots are tender and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Stir in kale and additional salt if desired and cook, stirring or tossing in the pan for another 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat, taste and adjust seasonings, and serve.

2016 CSA – Week 15: CSA Box Assembly

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CSA Newsletter – Week 15


CSA Box Assembly

This week I gained a greater appreciation for our CSA box assembly system. For no good reason other than its September and I just plain forgot (and the boxes had so many delicious veggies this week!), I didn’t to pull that last pallet of veggies out for the CSA line. I only realized that chard was missing from the box half way through the process! Adding chard to each box after they were assembled was certainly not as fun or easy as rolling the boxes down the assembly line.

Each week, we assemble the CSA boxes on Monday for midweek pickups and Friday for weekend pickups. After a morning of washing, lettuce, greens, salad mix, and filling orders, the barn is cleared to setup the CSA assembly line. The veggies are pulled out of the cooler, one pallet at a time, and are arranged in stations on either side of a rolling assembly line.  Potatoes are always first in the box followed by heavier things such as squash, melons, and cabbage. Root veggies and greens are next with onions, peppers and herbs to follow. Lettuce is always the last ingredient in the box.

This week, there were two people stationed at the potatoes, one at the acorn squash-melon station, one at the carrots-turnips-broccoli station, one at the Anaheim-poblano-dill station, one at the onions station, and one at the lettuce station. I’m at the end of the line; lidding boxes, checking to make sure that they have all of the ingredients, adding salad mix to salad lover and addict’s boxes, and making sure the right number are placed on each pallet. Once the line gets going, it’s a whirlwind of action until the last pallet is assembled.

 

Table of Box Contents

☐  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Make your own hash browns for breakfast or breakfast for dinner! See recipe.

☐  1 Honey Orange Melon ($5.00)

☐  1 Poblano Pepper ($1.00)

☐  2 Red Anaheim Peppers ($2.00)

☐  1 Bunch Hakurei Turnips ($3.50) – While these sweet turnips are delicious in salads or stir-fry’s, I typically end up snacking on them like an apple. The greens are delicious sautéed or in soup.

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Acorn Squash ($2.50) – Cut in half, remove the seeds (save for roasting), and bake face down in the oven until tender. Serve plain or with a little butter and maple syrup.

  Swiss Chard ($3.00)

  2 Dried Yellow Onions ($1.25)

☐  1 Dried Red Onion ($.50)

☐  Broccoli ($3.50) – Roast, sauté, grill, or make broccoli salad with garlic and sesame. See recipe.

☐  Dill ($2.00) – Use in potato salad, soups, or dips and dry the rest for later use. Dill can also be infused in vinegar, oil for, or butter for later use.

☐  2 lbs Big Beef Tomatoes ($6.00)

 Box Market Value: $41.00

 

Recipes

Homemade Hash Browns

After a weekend of hiking in the rain, I made a hearty breakfast complete with fried eggs and homemade hash browns. Homemade hash browns are delicious and easy to make.

  1. Shred potatoes and immediately put them into a bowl of cold water. Let soak for a few minutes.
  2. Place the potatoes on a (clean) dish towel, wrap them up and squeeze out any excess water.
  3. Heat a large skillet over high heat. Add a few tablespoons of butter or oil. Once it’s melted, add the potatoes in a thin layer and turn the heat down to medium-high.
  4. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Cook until very crispy and brown on the bottom, then flip and cook on the other side.

Read More: The Pioneer Woman

 

Broccoli Salad with Garlic and Sesame

Technically, this is a raw salad but the vinegar and oil in the dressing tenderize the salad as it marinated in the dressing.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste
  • 2 heads broccoli, 1 pound each, cut into bite-size florets
  • ¾ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 fat garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons roasted (Asian) sesame oil
  • Large pinch crushed red pepper flakes.

Preparation

  1. In a large bowl, stir together the vinegar and salt. Add broccoli and toss to combine.
  2. In a large skillet, heat olive oil until hot, but not smoking.
  3. Add garlic and cumin and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  4. Stir in sesame oil and pepper flakes.
  5. Pour mixture over broccoli and toss well. Let sit for at least 1 hour at room temperature, and up to 48 (chill it if you want to keep it for more than 2 hours). Adjust seasonings (it may need more salt) and serve.

Read More: NYT Cooking

Pan Seared Carrots with Lemon and Dill

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch (about 1 pound) carrots, scrubbed and patted dry
  • 2 teaspoons oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1 tablespoon dill, minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 

Preparation

  1. Cut carrots crosswise into pieces approximately 3 inches long. Cut any thick ends in half lengthwise, so all pieces are about 1/2- to 3/4-inch thick. In a bowl, toss with the oil and 1/4 teaspoon salt.
  2. Preheat pan over medium-high heat. Place carrots cut-side down on the pan and cover. Cook for 4-5 minutes, until the carrots develop sear marks and are beginning to soften. Flip, cover, and cook for another 4-5 minutes. Carrots will be softened with a bit of crunch in the middle.
  3. Transfer the carrots to a bowl. Mix in remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, dill, lemon juice and pepper. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Read More: TheKitchn

2016 CSA – Week 4: Cooking with Recipes

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CSA Newsletter – Week 4


Cooking with Recipes

I subscribe to cooking magazines and own several cookbooks and I love to read the recipes! However, when it comes to actually cooking, I almost never follow the recipe exactly. If I’m missing an ingredient, I’ll make a substitution or omit it all together. Or if there is something that I have in my fridge that I think would be a good addition to the dish, I’ll throw it in. To me, recipes are more of inspiration or reference rather than a formula. While this can be a risky approach when baking where ratios and ingredients can be critical, there is often a lot of room in for flexibility in recipes in cooking.

As a CSA member, your challenge each week is to utilize the contents of your box to make room for next week. There will be times when recipes you come across, even in the newsletter, call for ingredients that aren’t in your box. I encourage you to be flexible and adaptable. What recipe substitutions can you make to use your ingredients? Are there ingredients in your box that would be a great addition to a recipe that you found?

In the age of the internet, there are so many great digital resources for recipes and food preparation ideas. I have covered a few of my personal favorites in the recipe section.

Happy 4th of July and have a great week!

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

Napa Cabbage ($3.00)

great for stir fry, salad rolls, or coleslaw. See recipe!

Baby Red Onions ($2.50)

Chioggia Bunch Beets ($3.50) Remove greens and sauté or steam. Roast or steam beets. Great with balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre.

Cilantro ($2.00)

Jalapeno pepper ($0.50)

Broccoli ($1.75) Great fresh, sautéed, and in stir-fry

Fennel ($2.00) Use the bulb and fronds too. See recipe

3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads

2-4 zucchini ($3.25) try zucchini pancakes! See recipe.

3 Tomatoes ($4.50)

Box Market Value: $30.25

 

Digital Resources All about Food and Cooking

 Food 52

A site that started with a simple mission: talk about food! This site is a forum for what to cook, how to cook, and recipes too!

NewYorkTimes Cooking

Find cooking techniques, searchable recipes, and gorgeous pictures!

Bon Appétit

A food magazine that follows trends, chefs, and what’s in season. Visit Bon Appétit for trending food news and recipes!

Epicurious

Search their large database of recipes by ingredient or dish. And peruse their articles for ingredient tips and expert advice.

 

Recipes:

Thai Coleslaw with Mint and Cilantro

This fresh take on coleslaw comes to your from Christopher Kimball at Milk Street Kitchen. I made this last week and it was light and delicious. Make a large batch and eat it all week!

Coconut milk offers the right balance of richness and fresh flavor for this Napa cabbage-based coleslaw. Many vegetables worked well, but the combination of sweet sugar snap peas and crispy radishes tested best.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (add more to taste)
  • 1 medium serrano chili, seeded and minced
  • 5 tablespoons coconut milk (not light coconut milk)
  • 1 pound Napa cabbage (1 small head), thinly sliced crosswise (about 8 cups)
  • 6 radishes, trimmed, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces sugar snap peas, strings removed and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh mint
  • ½ cup roasted, salted cashews, coarsely chopped

Instructions

  1. In a liquid measuring cup, combine the lime juice, sugar, fish sauce and chili. Let sit for 10 minutes. Whisk in the coconut milk until combined.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, radishes, peas, cilantro and mint. Add the dressing and toss until evenly coated. Stir in the cashews and serve.

Read More: Milk Street Kitchen

 

Fennel Slaw with Mint Vinaigrette

The sugar helps bring out the natural sweetness of the fennel, don’t leave out!

Ingredients

  • 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 medium bulbs)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar (or honey)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 2 teaspoons minced shallot or onion

Make the vinaigrette: Put the lemon juice, shallot, mustard, salt, sugar and mint in a blender (or use whisk) and pulse briefly to combine. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil until it is well combined.

Shave the fennel into thin slices: Very thinly slice the fennel into 1/8 inch slices starting from the bottom of the bulb (use a mandolin if you have one). Chop some of the fennel fronds as well to toss in with the salad.

Marinate fennel with vinaigrette: Toss with the fennel and marinate for at least an hour. Serve this salad either cold or at room temperature.

Read More: Simplyrecipes.com

 

Zucchini Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups grated zucchini
  • 1/2 cup grated potato
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

 Instructions

  1. Grate zucchini and potato. Let drain in colander for at least 30 minutes. Salt generously.
  2. In a bowl, beat egg, chopped parsley, and lemon zest. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Roll and squeeze zucchini/potato mixture in a towel to soak up moisture.
  4. Combine zucchini / potato mixture with egg mixture. Mix well.
  5. Heat skillet on medium high heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter or olive oil. Drop a spoonful of mixture in pan. Pat with spatula to flatten as much as possible — it’ll be crispier that way.
  6. Cook 2 at a time until golden brown on each side. Serve as soon as possible, with a dollop of sour cream or yogurt on top.

Read More: Food52

 

CSA 2011 – Week 19: Pumpkin Picking and Potluck

We had our pumpkin party last Sunday, and it turned out to be a great day. We had cider and great food. When people started showing up, the children went right for the doughnuts and pumpkins. They each picked out their very own pumpkin from the field. Then, John went to go start the big red truck. The tour mobile’s battery was dead, so he got it charging right away. Unfortunately it did not charge up in time.

So, plan B was to try to pop the clutch. We started up one of the old Ford farm trucks we call the U-Haul. Then, John connected a large chain running from that truck to the tour mobile. Greg, a CSA member, kindly drove the Ford around with John riding in the tour mobile trying to pop the clutch. After one lap around the farmstand the tour mobile was still not running, so we resorted to plan C, a walking tour.

The walking tour was quite pleasant. It was a great day for a walk around the farm, and we even picked a few carrots while we were out there. The kids got to run through the ‘tomato jungle’! We turned around and headed back to the farmstand where we had the potluck part. There was some exciting food and an assortment of desserts. As the sun started to descend it warmed the deck. What a beautiful day!

Split Pea soup Recipe by CSA member Stephanie
1 delicata squash (2 sweet potatoes or 1/2 butternut squash can be substituted)
1/2 large onion
2 carrots, peeled
2 stalks celery
2 cups ham or thick cut bacon cut into 1 inch pieces (optional)
6 cups water
16 ounces dried split peas
1/2 teaspoon ground thyme
1 tablespoon fresh sage
1 tablespoon fresh basil
Salt and pepper to taste

Cube the potatoes or squash. Chop the onions, carrots and celery. Rinse the split peas and combine all ingredients into one big pot. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer covered for about an hour. If you like chunky split pea soup, keep it the way
it is, or use a hand blender to smooth it up.

Squash Towels! Have any old large bath towels laying around the house that need a new home? Bring them down to GTF! We have been enjoying a wonderful squash washing season and are in need of old towel donations for drying them. We’ll gladly take them off your hands!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Red Potatoes (Colorado rose or Rose gold) – Steam, roast, fry, mash, these are versatile.

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

3 onions (2 yellow, 1 white)– Caramelize, eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad.

1 shallot– Chop and add to soup, or use as base in sauces.

1 butternut squash– Cut in half, place on a sheet pan, flesh side down. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes. Scoop out the inside, puree, season and serve. You can use this in place of pumpkin in any recipe, or make a soup with it!

1 bunch black kale– Sauté in butter or olive oil and salt.

2 Italian peppers, 1 ruffle pimento—Grill, roast, or just eat raw; they are sweet.

1 kohlrabi– Shred raw and use in slaws or stir fries. You can also chop it up and roast it too.

1 Broccoli– Chop into small pieces and use in soups or roasted roots vegetables.

1 celeriac/celery root– Cut the bottom roots off. Peel the outside and then chop into cubes for roasting or soups. You can also make a wonderful potato/celeriac mash.

1 tomato– Chop and add to salads or sandwiches.

Potato and Celeriac puree
4 medium potatoes, chopped into cubes
1 celeriac, peeled and chopped into 1-inch cubes
1 clove garlic, minced
salt and pepper
2-3 tablespoons butter
2-3 tablespoons cream or milk

Boil the potatoes and celery root in two separate pots since they cook at different speeds. The celery root should take about 25 minutes to cook. The potatoes should take 35 minutes to cook.
Once both are cooked all the way through, strain and combine in a large bowl together. Mash either by hand with a potato masher or use a hand blender or mixer with the whisk attachment. Add the garlic while mashing along with the butter, cream, salt and pepper. Season to taste and serve.

Kohlrabi and Apple Slaw
DRESSING
1/4 cup cream
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 tablespoon good mustard (coarse stone ground, or Dijon will do)
1/2 teaspoon sugar
Salt & pepper to taste – go easy here
Fresh mint, chopped

1 pound fresh kohlrabi, trimmed, peeled, grated into large pieces
2 apples, peeled, grated into large pieces (try to keep equivalent volumes of kohl-
rabi:apple)

Whisk cream into light pillows – this takes a minute or so, no need to get out a mixer. Stir in remaining dressing ingredients, the kohlrabi and apple. Serve immediately.

Sautéed Black Kale

1 bunch black kale
1 shallot, chopped finely
Handful of mushrooms if you have them
Splash of white wine (optional)
2 tablespoons butter or olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Chop the kale into strips. Heat up the olive oil or butter on medium heat. Add the shallots and mushrooms and sauté until light brown or about 5 minutes. Add a splash of white wine and let it simmer down. Add the kale and continue to cook for about 2-3 minutes or until kale is cooked lightly, but not brown at all.