2016 CSA: Thank You, Thank You

csa-week-21-graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 21


Thank You, Thank You

Throughout the year, there are certain events that are indicators that remind us of the changing seasons. The end of the CSA is certainly one of them. It marks the beginning of the season winding down. In a month, many markets will be ending and things will start to get a little quieter around the farm. Then, before you know it, we start the cycle all over again!

We hope that you have enjoyed your CSA experience this year. We certainly appreciate your support! While we do have diversified sales avenues, the CSA remains a vital part of our farm model. Your support in the early months of the year when we are working hard to prepare for the growing season is very integral to our success. As an individual, your contribution may seem small but when there are 330 shares, that amounts to a lot of support!

On our end, we do our best to give you a taste of our seasonal offerings and to share the bounty of our harvest. Our way of saying thank you for investing in our farm is by loading you up with veggies throughout the season. This year, the market value of your CSA veggies was about 35% over what you paid for your share.

Thank you for your support and we hope that you’ll join us again!

 

Table of Box Contents

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Butternut Squash ($3.00) – Butternut squash is incredibly versatile and delicious. The skin is thin enough that you can eat cooled or peal it easily before cooking. Roast it, use it for pie, add it to soup, the possibilities are endless!

☐  1 Pie Pumpkin ($4.00) – This pumpkin is cute to look at and is tatsy to eat too. Roast it and make a pie, or use it in soup or curry. If you have leftovers when you cook it, freeze for later use this winter.

☐  White Kale ($3.00)

  1 Celeriac ($2.50) – You are now acquainted with this gnarly fall veggie. Roast it, mash it, add it to soup. Try the Root Ribbons with Sage recipe.

☐  Bulk Carrots ($2.00)

☐  2 Parsnips ($2.00) – Parsnips are deliciously sweet when sautéed or roasted. Use them to make home fries, pureed soup, or mashed.

☐  Parsley ($2.00) – Parsley is a great addition or garnish to almost any dish. Add it to salad, soups, pesto, or salad dressings. Not going to use it all? Dry it for later use!

☐  1 Shallot ($1.50)

  2 Storage Onions ($1.50) – These onions are not as sweet raw but are delicious when cooked and they can last a very long time when stored in a dry, dark area.

Box Market Value: $25.00

 

Recipes

Butternut Squash and Kale Torte

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • ½ small butternut squash (about 1 lb)
  • 1 medium red onion
  • 1 small bunch kale
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • 1 medium Yukon gold potato (about 6 oz)
  • 6 oz. thinly sliced provolone cheese (from the deli counter)
  • 1 plum tomato
  • ¼ c. grated Parmesan (1 oz)

Preparation

Heat oven to 425°F. Oil a 9-in. springform pan. Arrange half the butternut squash in the bottom of the pan, in concentric circles. Top with half the onion, separating the rings. Top with half the kale, drizzle with half the oil and season with 1/4 tsp salt. Top with the potatoes and half the provolone cheese.

Top with remaining kale, drizzle with the remaining oil and season with 1/4 tsp each salt and pepper. Top with the remaining onion, tomatoes and provolone. Arrange the remaining squash on top and sprinkle with the Parmesan.

Jerry Traunfeld’s Root Ribbons with Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds medium root vegetables, such as carrots, parsnips, celeriac, rutabagas, turnips, parsley root, or salsify (avoid beets)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped sage
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

 Preparation

Wash and peel the roots and discard the peelings. Continue to peel the vegetables from their tops to the root tips to produce ribbons, rotating the roots on their axis a quarter turn after each strip is peeled, until you’re left with cores that are too small to work with. (You can snack on these or save them for stock.) Alternately, you may use a mandoline.

Melt the butter with the sage in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir for a minute to partially cook the sage. Add the root ribbons and toss them with tongs until they begin to wilt. Add the salt, a good grinding of black pepper, the maple syrup, lemon juice, and about 3/4 cup of water.

 

Butternut Squash Fries

As you probably know by now, I believe that anything is more delicious in fry form. Squash is now exception. Try making parsnip fries too. For a great dipping sauce, make herbed aioli with your fresh herbs.

 Ingredients

  • 1 butternut squash
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • sea salt to garnish

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 400° F. Peel and cut the squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds and then cut each half into fries or wedges.

Toss the fries in oil and then place in a single layer onto a baking tray. Bake for 20-35 minutes (depending on the size of your fries) turning once.

Remove from the oven and sprinkle with sea salt.

Lunch Menu: Week of November 4, 2014

ONLY TWO WEEKS LEFT!

What? I know, that’s what I’m saying. How is that possible that we have come to the end of another season?

I have loved thinking and planning and cooking for you all for these last several years. I am grateful that you still want to come and sample what we are cooking/experimenting with. Italy has become a welcome and comfortable inspiration to our menus and plating style. Mille grazie a tutti. We will spend all winter practicing and researching new pastas for next year!

For now come and try some of our comfort food for the cool weather.

jc,

gtf chef

 

Antipasti

salumi plate with cornichon, olives and house mustard and brie cheese 8.5
mixed field greens with balsamic vinaigrette 6.5
GTF salad –roasted delicata, pistachios, blue cheese and parsley vinaigrette 9.5
butternut squash soup with artisan bread 4/6
hearty vegetables & couscous in chicken broth soup with artisan bread 4/6

Pizze Rosso
garlic/oregano/mozzarella 9.5
Italian sausage/delicata/arugula/mozzarella 10.5
kalamata olive/blue cheese/spinach/mozzarella 10.

Pizze Bianco
ham/leeks/gruyere/mozzarella 10.5
kale/peppers/corn/mozzarella 10.
egg/bacon/parsley 10.

–add an egg or anchovies for a dollar
Secondi
tagliatelle with delicata, cavelo nero & fresh tomato sauce 9.5
autumn risotto with chiogga beets, butternut squash & arugula 10
crespelle delicata & besciamella with smashed butternut, kale & basil pesto 10
alpine cheese gratinata with leeks, roasted peppers & cauliflower 9.5
lamb meatballs with roasted potatoes , GTF sauerkraut & house mustard 10.5

Lunch Menu: Week of September 23, 2014

It’s warm and filling menu time! The gray day calls for something out of the wood fired oven…pizza pizza. We also have a lovely bay shrimp salad on the menu!

To Start
country pâté with mixed olives, mustard, pickled peppers 5.5
mixed field greens with balsamic vinaigrette 6.5
newport bay shrimp salad on red butter lettuce
GTF salad – house smoked duck breast with delicata, capers and red onion and herb vinaigrette 9.5
caprese salad – tomato, basil, extra virgin, balsamic, fresh mozzarella and artisan bread 9.5
ducky onion w/herbs soup with artisan bread 4/6
vegetable soup with artisan bread 4/6

Pizze Rosso
garlic/basil/mozzarella 9.5
bacon/eggplant/spinach/mozzarella 10.5
kalamata olive/peppers/red onion /mozzarella 10.5

Pizze Bianco
ham/zucchini/mozzarella 10.5
butternut squash/tomato/blue cheese/mozzarella 9.5
colazione-bacon/egg/scallion/black pepper 10.5

Secondi
chicken & mushroom ravioli with squash and eggplant 10.5
pork ragú over green kale & pappardelle 9.5
roasted peppers & spinach over creamy polenta with poached egg* 9.5
torta de crespelle of winter squash, kale and onion 9.5
fish stew of tuna & shrimp with fennel, leeks, tomato and aioli 10

Winter Squash

 Gathering Together Farm winter squash display at the Corvallis Farmers’ Market

 A version of this post was first published on Wayward Spark.

Gathering Together Farm grows (among other things) seven types of winter squash on about five acres of fertile ground. Planting, tending, harvesting, washing, packing, and delivering the bounty to market requires a lot of time and a lot of laboring, but the result is monumental and delicious. Their delicata squash crop alone yields about 20,000 pounds of fruit.

buttercup squash, kabocha squash

Squash varieties have been trialed and selected over the years based on several characteristics: yield, market demand, storage, and taste. An individual variety may rate well in regards to several traits but poorly with others. Pie pumpkins are in demand, but they don’t keep very well. Kabocha squash has a decent yield, stores fairly well, and is delicious, but people often aren’t very familiar with it and are sometimes intimidated by its relatively large size.

delicata squash

Delicata squash is a perpetual favorite. Perfect size. Perfect sweet smooth flavor. Easy to cut into. Easily blends into any autumnal recipe. GTF with our partners at Wild Garden Seed grow, save, and sell a farm-original, ‘Zeppelin’ variety of delicata. (You can read the whole story of how they managed to avoid seed contaminated with bitterness like so many other farms experienced a decade ago.)

The farm’s seed/irrigation/greenhouse manager Joelene has observed that winter squash will produce more vibrant vines and have a larger fruit set if they are direct seeded in the spring. The downside of this method is that a wet spring can delay planting, or an early frost can leave a whole crop of underripe squash sitting unharvested in the field. Transplanting young squash seedlings is a more reliable though somewhat less productive method employed by GTF.

acorn squash

Winter squash begins to ripen in September, but the main harvest starts in early October. The skins of the squash harden, and the vines yellow and eventually die back. Before the first frost, teams of laborers head out to the fields to clip the squash stems and later load the harvest into industrial onion bins (with a method similar to the watermelon toss seen here). Bins are trucked back to the farm packing and storage area where they will be washed, sorted, and wiped dry by more workers with the help of a conveyor-belt sprayer system. Squash that doesn’t meet high quality control standards is donated to the regional food bank or composted.

 butternut squash, ambercup squash

Squash will generally keep for several months if it is kept in a dry place at a consistant, cool temperature. At the farm, squash that isn’t sold shortly after harvest is stored in a large shipping container with a dehumidifier.

Gathering Together Farm sells squash in all of our farmers’ market booths, to restaurants and grocery stores in Corvallis and the Portland area, and at our Farm Stand. We also have a long-standing contract for many tons of butternut squash with Oregon-based distributor of organic produce, Organically Grown Company.

This year, GTF grew the following varieties of winter squash:

Butternut

Metro‘ from Johnny’s Selected Seed
‘JSW 6823’ from Johnny’s Selected Seed
Early Butternut‘ from Osborne Seed Company
Nutterbutter‘ from High Mowing Seed Company

 

Kabocha

Delica‘ from Osborne Seed Company
Sweet Mama‘ from Osborne Seed Company
Cha Cha‘ from Johnny’s Selected Seed
Sunshine‘ (orange) from Johnny’s Selected Seed

 

Buttercup

‘Bon Bon’ from Johnny’s Selected Seed

 

Acorn

Jet‘ from Johnny’s Selected Seed

 

Delicata

Zeppelin‘ from Wild Garden Seed

 ‘Marina Di Chioggia‘ from Johnny’s Selected Seed

Sweet Meat‘ from Territorial Seed Company

CSA 2011 – Week 19: Pumpkin Picking and Potluck

We had our pumpkin party last Sunday, and it turned out to be a great day. We had cider and great food. When people started showing up, the children went right for the doughnuts and pumpkins. They each picked out their very own pumpkin from the field. Then, John went to go start the big red truck. The tour mobile’s battery was dead, so he got it charging right away. Unfortunately it did not charge up in time.

So, plan B was to try to pop the clutch. We started up one of the old Ford farm trucks we call the U-Haul. Then, John connected a large chain running from that truck to the tour mobile. Greg, a CSA member, kindly drove the Ford around with John riding in the tour mobile trying to pop the clutch. After one lap around the farmstand the tour mobile was still not running, so we resorted to plan C, a walking tour.

The walking tour was quite pleasant. It was a great day for a walk around the farm, and we even picked a few carrots while we were out there. The kids got to run through the ‘tomato jungle’! We turned around and headed back to the farmstand where we had the potluck part. There was some exciting food and an assortment of desserts. As the sun started to descend it warmed the deck. What a beautiful day!

Split Pea soup Recipe by CSA member Stephanie
1 delicata squash (2 sweet potatoes or 1/2 butternut squash can be substituted)
1/2 large onion
2 carrots, peeled
2 stalks celery
2 cups ham or thick cut bacon cut into 1 inch pieces (optional)
6 cups water
16 ounces dried split peas
1/2 teaspoon ground thyme
1 tablespoon fresh sage
1 tablespoon fresh basil
Salt and pepper to taste

Cube the potatoes or squash. Chop the onions, carrots and celery. Rinse the split peas and combine all ingredients into one big pot. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer covered for about an hour. If you like chunky split pea soup, keep it the way
it is, or use a hand blender to smooth it up.

Squash Towels! Have any old large bath towels laying around the house that need a new home? Bring them down to GTF! We have been enjoying a wonderful squash washing season and are in need of old towel donations for drying them. We’ll gladly take them off your hands!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Red Potatoes (Colorado rose or Rose gold) – Steam, roast, fry, mash, these are versatile.

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

3 onions (2 yellow, 1 white)– Caramelize, eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad.

1 shallot– Chop and add to soup, or use as base in sauces.

1 butternut squash– Cut in half, place on a sheet pan, flesh side down. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes. Scoop out the inside, puree, season and serve. You can use this in place of pumpkin in any recipe, or make a soup with it!

1 bunch black kale– Sauté in butter or olive oil and salt.

2 Italian peppers, 1 ruffle pimento—Grill, roast, or just eat raw; they are sweet.

1 kohlrabi– Shred raw and use in slaws or stir fries. You can also chop it up and roast it too.

1 Broccoli– Chop into small pieces and use in soups or roasted roots vegetables.

1 celeriac/celery root– Cut the bottom roots off. Peel the outside and then chop into cubes for roasting or soups. You can also make a wonderful potato/celeriac mash.

1 tomato– Chop and add to salads or sandwiches.

Potato and Celeriac puree
4 medium potatoes, chopped into cubes
1 celeriac, peeled and chopped into 1-inch cubes
1 clove garlic, minced
salt and pepper
2-3 tablespoons butter
2-3 tablespoons cream or milk

Boil the potatoes and celery root in two separate pots since they cook at different speeds. The celery root should take about 25 minutes to cook. The potatoes should take 35 minutes to cook.
Once both are cooked all the way through, strain and combine in a large bowl together. Mash either by hand with a potato masher or use a hand blender or mixer with the whisk attachment. Add the garlic while mashing along with the butter, cream, salt and pepper. Season to taste and serve.

Kohlrabi and Apple Slaw
DRESSING
1/4 cup cream
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 tablespoon good mustard (coarse stone ground, or Dijon will do)
1/2 teaspoon sugar
Salt & pepper to taste – go easy here
Fresh mint, chopped

1 pound fresh kohlrabi, trimmed, peeled, grated into large pieces
2 apples, peeled, grated into large pieces (try to keep equivalent volumes of kohl-
rabi:apple)

Whisk cream into light pillows – this takes a minute or so, no need to get out a mixer. Stir in remaining dressing ingredients, the kohlrabi and apple. Serve immediately.

Sautéed Black Kale

1 bunch black kale
1 shallot, chopped finely
Handful of mushrooms if you have them
Splash of white wine (optional)
2 tablespoons butter or olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Chop the kale into strips. Heat up the olive oil or butter on medium heat. Add the shallots and mushrooms and sauté until light brown or about 5 minutes. Add a splash of white wine and let it simmer down. Add the kale and continue to cook for about 2-3 minutes or until kale is cooked lightly, but not brown at all.