2016 CSA – Week 20: From the Field to the Fridge

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CSA Newsletter – Week 20


From the Field to the Fridge

I have the pleasure of hosting a pickup each week in Corvallis. It is there that I get to see the fruits of our labor enjoyed by CSA members, their children, and even a few dogs! Last week, I was chatting with a member about how many vegetables are groomed during harvest or during packing on the farm. For some vegetables, there is quite a transformation from the field to your fridge.

Anything with a twist tie has been bunched in the field. That means that several plants, leaves, or stems are gathered together, sometimes from multiple plants or stalks, to make a bunch. Bunches must be uniform and consistent, it is certainly a skill. Bunches are comprised of the best vegetation from a planting, so no matter how the planting looks in the fields, the bunches will always look great!

Root crops such as beets, turnips, or rutabagas are trimmed in the field. The greens are left in the field along with any roots that are clearly not marketable. The resulting harvest is brought into the barn for washing and further grading.

In the barn, cabbages are peeled down to layers without holes or blemishes. Onions are peeled to check for quality. Leeks and scallions tops are trimmed or chopped.

All of this selection allows us to bring you the best of what we have to offer. Enjoy!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Crown Prince Squash ($6.50) – This beautiful blue squash is a great keeper and has dense, sweet orange flesh. Roast it and use it for pie, soup, or eat it as is.

☐  1 Black Radish ($1.00) – This striking radish is very versatile. It is a bit denser than a salad radish but can certainly be eaten fresh when sliced thin. Try adding it to gratins or roasting it, see recipe.

☐  1 Watermelon Radish ($1.00) – These radishes are a welcomed burst of color in the fall. Slice into the green and white radish to reveal a vibrant pink interior. Add some color to any salad, soup, or veggie roast.

  1 Cabbage ($6.25) – This cabbage will keep for several weeks (or longer) in your fridge and can become an ingredient in many meals. Try it stir-fried, in soups, salads, or stuffed.

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Swiss Chard ($3.00)

  1 Red Onion ($0.75)

☐  2 Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. They are delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $30.00

 

Recipes

Pumpkin Pie

 For the Crust

  • 3 cups raw pecans
  • 6 tbsp. light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 12 tsp. kosher salt
  • 6 tbsp. butter, cubed

For the Filling

  • 1 ¾ Cup roasted squash
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup 2% milk

Preheat oven to 350° with rack in the middle position. Pulse pecans, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in food processor until coarsely chopped. Add butter and pulse until mixture is finely ground and holds together like damp sand. Press most of the pecan mixture into deep dish 9″ pie plate, Bake 8–10 minutes until lightly colored and fragrant. Set aside until ready to fill.

In large bowl, combine the squash, eggs, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves; beat until smooth. (I like to use a food processor)  Gradually beat in milk. Pour into crust.

Bake at 350° for  50-60 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cover edges with foil during the last 30 minutes to prevent over-browning if necessary. Cool on a wire rack. Refrigerate leftovers.

Read More: Saveur for crust and TasteofHome for filling.

 

Roasted Radishes

Radishes are delicious raw in salads but they are also delicious cooked or roasted. Cooking tones down the spiciness so if you aren’t’ a fan of raw radishes, try them cooked!

Ingredients

  • 3 large watermelon radishes, peeled
  • 1 Black radish, peeled
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

Chèvre Horseradish Dressing

  • Fresh horseradish
  • Zest from 1/2 of a lemon
  • 1 ½ tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ cup chèvre
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400º.  Cover a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil, coat lightly with oil.

Cut radishes into 1/2-inch thick, even pieces. Toss radish pieces with olive oil, salt, and pepper in a large bowl to coat evenly. Distribute the radish pieces in an even layer on the baking sheet.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring after 15 minutes. Radishes should have some browning, and retain some firmness when they are done.

While radishes are roasting, grate about 2 to 3 packed tablespoons’ worth of fresh horseradish. Thoroughly combine 1 ½  tbsp of the grated horseradish with the lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, chèvre, and 1/8 tsp salt.

Once radishes have finished roasting, transfer them to the bowl with the dressing. Toss to coat. Taste and add salt if needed. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Read More: Food52

 

Kimchi-Style Sautéed Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 2 scallions, cut into ½” pieces, plus more, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 1” piece peeled ginger, chopped
  • 2 tbsp gochujang
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ½ head green cabbage, cut into 1” strips
  • Kosher salt

Preparation

Purée scallions, garlic, ginger, gochujang, fish sauce, and rice vinegar in a blender. Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Cook cabbage, tossing often, until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add scallion mixture and sliced scallions; season with salt.

Read More: BonAppetit

 

2016 CSA – Week 1: Greetings from the Farmers

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CSA Newsletter  – Week 1


Greetings from the Farmers

Thank you for joining us in our 19th CSA season! Last week, I saw the first heirloom tomato in the barn – a sure sign of the summer bounty that is yet to come. Your contribution as a CSA member provided a much needed kick start to our off-season allowing us to do such things as purchase seed and graft tomatoes months before the first harvest. The next 21 weeks is our way of saying thank you for your support.

Thank you to those who were able to contribute to the scholarship fund. This year we were able to make it possible for two local families take part in our CSA program.

The CSA newsletter is a way for me to share a little bit about the contents of each box, keep you up to date on farm happenings, and share ideas about ways to prepare your weekly supply of veggies. We would also love to hear from you! Share your favorite recipes or preparation methods, pictures, or questions. If you are social media savvy, you can find us on Facebook and Instagram at @gatheringtogetheringfarm and hashtag your pictures and comments with #gtfcsa so that we can find you! I will be sure to share tips, recipes, and questions in future newsletters.

Thanks so much everyone. Happy first week!

– Lily Walton, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents:

☐ Lettuce ($2.00) Store greens in mesh bag (or paper towel) inside plastic bag or container in fridge.

☐ 1½ lbs New Potatoes ($4.50) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

☐ Red Kale ($3.00) Separate the stems from the leaves by holding base of the stem and sliding your the other hand along the stem towards the tip of the leaf. Reserve the stems for sautéing or for adding flavor to soups or stews.

☐ 2-3 Zucchini ($4.00) Great on the grill or sautéed with garlic and onions.

☐ Bunch Carrots ($3.50) Remove tops for storage. Eat them fresh, roast them, or add them to stir fry.

☐ 3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads.

☐ 2 Storage Onions ($2.00)

☐ Fresh Thyme ($2.00)

☐ 1 Siletz Tomato ($2.50)

☐ 1 head cabbage ($4.00)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $31.00

 

Recipes:

The Versatility of Kale

Kale has become quite a popular vegetable touted for its nutritional value and cancer fighting properties. However I love kale because of its taste and versatility. It can be eaten raw, blanched, sautéed, you name it.

For a decadent raw kale salad, try this recipe from The Pioneer Woman. The vinegar in the dressing helps to break down the hardy kale leaves.


Killer Kale Salad

4 slices thin bacon, cut into bits

1 tablespoon butter

1 whole medium red onion, halved And sliced

8 ounces, weight white mushrooms, sliced

1/2 cup white wine

Salt And pepper, to taste

4 ounces goat cheese crumbled

3/4 cups olive oil

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

1 bunch kale

  • Fry the bacon bits until slightly crisp. Drain on a paper towel.
  • Pour out most of the grease and add the butter to the skillet. Add the onions and cook them over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until soft. Remove them to a plate. Add the mushrooms, stir, then add the wine, and salt and pepper. Turn the heat to medium-high and cook the mushrooms for several minutes, until most of the wine has evaporated and the mushrooms are soft. Remove them from the heat and set them aside.
  • Add the olive oil, vinegar, thyme, salt, and pepper to a mason jar and shake it to combine.
  • Remove the kale leaves from the stalks, then roll them up in batches and slice very thinly. Place the kale in a bowl. Add half the dressing and toss. Then add mushrooms, onions, and bacon and toss again. Finally, add the goat cheese and more dressing if needed, and toss. (Reserve extra dressing for another use.)

Oven Roasted Veggies, with or without Chicken

If the weather outside is any indication (at least in Philomath), maybe it isn’t quite summer yet. This box is perfect for roasted veggies – onions, carrots, potatoes, and season with olive oil, salt, fresh thyme and any other herbs that you have around. If you’re a meat eater, roast the veggies with bone in chicken thighs.

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 450 ° F
  • Cut onions, carrots, potatoes, and any other root veggies that you may have into evenly sized pieces. If potatoes are small, leave them whole
  • Toss with a few pinches of salt, thyme (oregano and parsley if you have it), and 3 tablespoons (or more) of olive oil
  • Place veggies in baking dish or a cast iron pan
  • Blot dry chicken thighs, brush with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and pepper
  • Place chicken on top of roasted veggies and bake for 40-45 minutes until the skin is crispy and browned and the vegetables are tender.

 

CSA 2011 – Week 17: More on Storing Vegetables!

It’s hard to believe, but melons are gone and squash is here! There will most likely be a winter squash in each box for the rest of the season. Provided below is more information on storing and keeping vegetables. These are storing tips from Johnny’s Seed catalog.

Vegetables that last…

1-2 months: Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, parsley, turnips, winter squash (acorn and delicata).
2-4 months: Leeks, pumpkins, radishes, winter squash (buttercup, hubbard, kabocha, and Spaghetti).
4 months plus: Beets, cabbage, carrots, celeriac, garlic, Jerusalem artichoke, onions, parsnips, dried hot peppers, potatoes, rutabagas, butternut squash.

Temperature and humidity play a big role in a vegetable’s ability to store. Here are some tips on how these vegetables store best below:

Cold and Humid: Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celeriac, leeks, parsley, radishes, rutabagas, and turnips.
Cool and Humid: Potatoes.
Cold and Dry: Garlic and Onions (this is why these are best stored when dry in a paper bag, or a bag with holes; not plastic).
Cool and Dry: Pumpkins, winter squash.

Winter Squash Information:
Acorn: Last up to 3 months
Spaghetti Squash: Lasts up to 3 months
Delicata and similar types: Stores up to 4 months
Buttercup: Sweeter after storing for a few weeks; keeps up to 4 months
Kabocha: Gets sweeter when stored for a few weeks; green varieties keep from 4-5 months. Grey varieties will keep up to 6 months.
Butternut and Hubbard: Best a few weeks after harvest; will store up to 6 months.
All Squash stores best if it’s stem is still intact.

Squash Towels! Have any old towels laying around the house that need a new home? Bring them down to GTF! We are at the brink of a wonderful squash washing season and are in need of old towel donations for drying them. We’ll gladly take them off your hands!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (nicola)– Steam, roast, fry, mash; you can do just about anything with these!

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

2 onions (wallas)– Caramelize, eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad.

1 bunch of scallions– Chop raw for salad, mix chopped green tops with cheese or eggs.

2 delicata squash– Roast with olive oil and salt, add onions, scallions, or even chopped peppers if you’d like.

1 bunch of red kale– Sauté in butter or olive oil and salt. (See recipe)

2 colored peppers- Grill, roast, or just eat raw; they are sweet.

1 bag baby onions – Cut them into quarters and add to vegetable roasts or sautés.

1 Cauliflower or Romanesco– Roast with olive oil and salt, top with cheese and scallions.

Red oak, cardinal, red Leaf, or green leaf lettuce- Make a salad, or add to sandwiches. Use to make lettuce wraps.

Tomatoes (approximately 2 lbs) – Chop raw on salad or sandwiches.

Roasted Cauliflower with cheese
1 large head or 2 small heads of cauliflower or Romanesco, cut into quarter size or larger pieces.
4 tablespoons of melted butter
Handful of baby onions(6 or so), cut in half and then sliced into quarters
1/2 cup of shredded parmesan cheese
1/4 cup finely chopped green onion tops
Pinch of salt
1 cup of sourdough or whole grain bread crumbs (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Mix the cauliflower, onions, scallion tops, butter and salt together. Place in a baking pan or dish and in the oven for about 20 minutes or until the cauliflower is mostly cooked but not brown yet. Add the shredded cheese on top and continue roasting until the cheese melts and starts to bubble and turn a light shade of brown. Add the bread crumbs in with the cheese if you want bread crumbs. This dish is versatile and a variety of seasonings can be used in it, such as chile flakes, chopped peppers, tomatoes, or even parsley. Mix it up! Try new things!

Roasted Delicata Squash
Cut the squash in half. Remove the seeds (you can save these seeds and roast them for eating or dry them for planting). Cut the squash up into 1/2 inch pieces. Place in a baking pan or casserole dish with olive oil, some pieces of butter and salt. Bake at 400 degrees for about 30 minutes, checking the squash and mixing it every 10 minutes or so. For a crispier, more caramelized flavor turn the oven on broil for about 3-5 minutes at the end. Keep a close eye on it, the squash will brown fast. I like to eat the skins of the delicata, they are not tough and have a good flavor. Try seasonings with minced garlic if you want! But it’s wonderful plain as well.

Dan the Man’s Red Kale Specialty
1 bunch red kale
1 tablespoon soy sauce
Pinch of cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 c rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1/3 c extra virgin olive oil

Cut the leaves of the kale off where they end. You can remove the stem part if it’s too thick for your liking. Chiffonade (cut very thinly) the leaves and combine all the ingredients into one bowl. Mix thoroughly and serve. You can let it sit for 15-20 minutes before serving if you like, the kale will seem more cooked if you do. Dan says this recipe is a great way to eat any type of kale and the two acids in the recipe are what actually cook the kale. It is also great leftover the next day, the kale is tender as if it had been lightly cooked. Adjust the ingredients to your liking. If you like more soy sauce and less rice vinegar try that, or add some raw minced garlic if you want.

Enjoy!

Late Fall CSA Box 2011

Cannot bear to think of what you are going to do when your vegetable boxes end? Fret no longer…

We are offering a late fall CSA! These boxes will be perfect for those of you who love root crops such as carrots, beets, turnips, celeriac, parsnips and potatoes! It will also include winter greens: kale, collards, chard, bok choy, and cabbage. Winter squash, leeks, and onions will be included in these boxes as well, along with a bag of salad mix every week!

We will be able to offer 2 pickup sites on Saturdays only:

1) Portland Saturday Market
2) the GTF Farm
We may be able to add another pickup location in Corvallis if someone has a nice sheltered garage or space by their house that they could offer.
It will run for 4 weeks, from November 19th-December 10th, $100 for 4 weeks.

CSA 2011 – Week 4: More than Just Farming

When you think about farms and farming, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? For me six years ago, it was fields of plenty, chickens, cows – you know the picturesque version of Old McDonald. Since I began working on farms four years ago, my vision is a little different. Don’t get me wrong, I still love it; I love getting up at the crack of dawn to go pick lettuce, or getting to feel the warmth of the morning sun while washing potatoes. However, farmers, small and large, have to deal with regulations, certifications and logistics constantly, probably just as much as any other business if not more.

One of these logistics is our basic organic certification. Oregon Tilth visits us every year in order for us to hold our organic standing. We have to list everything we grow and everything we use in growing our vegetables. We are also in the process of being certified by the AJP (Agricultural Justice Project). AJP is mostly all about treating employees fairly, similar to a fair trade certification. We completed the process for AJP, and we expect to be certified soon. OGC (Organically Grown Company) is going to be requiring all of their produce providers to have the AJP certification by 2012. This is a must for us, since we sell them quite a bit of overflow produce throughout the year. The ODA (Oregon Department of Agriculture) also pays us a visit just about every year, but mainly to inspect our on-site kitchen.

Last week, we had a surprise visit from an OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) inspector. OSHA mainly ensures worker safety, and this inspection went pretty well, but it reminded us that being safe in a work place, especially a place with a lot of equipment, is key. This is just one of many hurdles that any organic farm that wants to function as a business must deal with. On top of worrying about seeding, transplanting, prepping ground, composting, harvesting , weeding, washing, and conducting all eight weekly markets, we have these certifications and inspections annually.

Overall, these certifications are positive because they are made to ensure proper treating of the land and workers, a type of check and balance. However, it makes one realize that in order to make a business out of farming, there are a lot of little details to work out and make note of. At the end of the day, it all seems worth it when you get to settle into a lovely bowl of salad greens, cucumber salad and grilled zucchinis. I will be dreaming of August heat and melons and forget all about the acronyms until they come knocking next year.

Lisa Hargest
CSA coordinator

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Colorado Rose Potatoes – These are best steamed or fried
Carrots, bunched – They are great raw, on salad, slaw or even stir fried.
1 bunch Baby Onions – Chop the onions and eat raw on salads or soups. The top green part goes well with eggs, cheese, stir fries or pasta.
1 Cabbage – Make slaw! I like my slaw with a oil and vinegar dressing
1 pint Snow Peas – Eat them raw or do a quick sauté with butter or olive oil and salt.
1 bunch of Basil – Make pesto, add to pasta dishes, salads, or even sandwiches. See recipe.
Assorted Summer Squash (1lb) – Try them sautéed, grilled, grated raw, soup or stir fried.
Romaine Lettuce – Great for salads or on sandwiches, Romaine is the traditional Caesar salad lettuce. See recipe.

 

Recipes:

  • Basic Basil Pesto
    1 bunch of basil, leaves removed
    3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
    3 cloves of garlic, coarsely chopped
    2 Tablespoons chopped nuts (almonds or pine nuts work best)
    2 Tablespoons grated parmesan cheese
    Juice of 1 lemon
    Pinch of salt
  • Combine olive oil and garlic in a blender or food processor, blend for 1 minute, or until garlic is fine.
  • Add basil leaves and nuts, pulse until the basil is as fine as you would like it. Add lemon juice and cheese and pulse a but more.
  • Salt to taste.

You can do this by hand if you don’t have a blender or food processor, by hand chopping everything and mixing. Note, you don’t have to use the lemon juice if you don’t wish to, but it does keep the pesto from turning brown on top.
Use Basil Pesto as a topping for roasted or steamed potatoes, or a dip for carrots, cucumbers or peas.

  • Dan the Man’s cucumber salad
    3 thinly sliced cucumbers
    1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
    2 Tablespoons sesame oil
    2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    1 teaspoon maple syrup/ or honey
    Pinch of salt
  • Combine all the ingredients and let marinate for 30 minutes before eating.

    Variations:
    Add chopped baby onions or onion tops.
    Add snow peas, chopped cabbage or shredded carrots to make a more slaw-like dish.

Caesar Salad Dressing:
2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and chopped
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
3 Tablespoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, chopped
Pinch of black pepper to taste

Use this dressing on Chopped Romaine lettuce for a lovely Caesar salad. Add parmesan cheese or home-made croutons out of leftover bread on top.

Grilled Caesar Variation:  Try cutting the head of romaine into quarters and brushing with olive oil and grill about 1-2 minutes on either side. Take off the grill, chop or keep whole and dress the salad, serve warm right away.