August 20th Market Recipes ft. Crockett Green Beans

A big thanks to everyone who braved the heat and made it out to one of our farmers markets yesterday! Our marketeers and our produce were a bit wilted by the end of the day, but we made it through! Despite the heat wave, there was still one very good reason to turn on the stove, and that reason was green beans.

Last season we grew a new variety of bush beans called Crockett and we were blown away by their highly productive growth habit and even ripening. Not only did they yield extremely well, but their quality of flavor and plumpness were exceptional, so much so that we sold out nearly every market. Yesterday at market we cooked up some of our Crockett beans and sampled many other summer treats raw. At home, I made lacto-fermented dilly beans that remain crisp and flavorful throughout the winter months!

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  • Crockett Green Bean Sauté with Tamari
    • Ingredients:
      • 1-2 lbs. green beans
      • 1 large shallot, finely chopped
      • 4-6 cloves garlic or 2-3 cloves elephant garlic, minced
        • Some of our markets carry elephant garlic, but in Corvallis I used some wonderful garlic from Goodfoot Farm.
      • Olive oil
      • Tamari
      • Salt
    • Directions:
  1.  Pre-snap the stems off of your green beans. It takes a bit of time, so I prefer to do it before I turn on the pan. Either leave your beans long, or snap them in half, whichever you prefer.
  2. Coat the pan in olive oil and heat up to medium high temperature. Meanwhile, chop up your shallots and add them into the oil once it’s up to temperature.
  3. Add about 3-4 Tbsp tamari to the shallots in the pan and let cook about 2 minutes. This will make a kind of tamari reduction that will coat your beans.
  4. Add in your snapped green beans and stir around to coat in oil, adding more if need be. Cover and let cook about 5 minutes, as the green beans take a while to cook through and will need the extra heat. Meanwhile, mince garlic.
  5. Remove the lid from the pan and add in the garlic, 2-3 pinches of salt, and 2-3 more Tbsp of tamari. Let cook another 5-10 minutes to your preferred softness.
  6. This is a great dish as it is so full of protein it can be eaten solo, but it is also wonderful served with a side of rice next to chicken or tofu. Green bean season is now! Don’t miss out on the deliciousness.
  • Tomato Basil Salad (July 2nd post)Copy of CAM00415 (2)
  • Raw Pimento Peppers
    • Pimento peppers look like flattened red bell peppers, but with thick walls and a crazy sweet flavor. I like to eat them raw like apples this time of year, but they’re also excellent raw as a vehicle for dip or cooked lightly in a sauté. See the photo at right.
  • Melons!!! Check out next week’s post for a detailed breakdown of our 2016 melon varieties.
    • Red, Orange, Yellow, and Sorbet WatermelonIMG_20150822_155628 (2)
    • Charentais and Divergent Cantaloupe
    • Honey Orange Melon

 

CSA 2011 – Week 15: ‘Ode to the Johns’

Most of you are all aware of Farmer John, Sally, Rodrigo, Joelene, Frank, and all of the other characters that float around the farm daily. I wonder, however, how many CSA members are familiar with the Johns, meaning John Petillo and Jon Boro. These guys have a huge role in keeping the farm running, or shall I say, farm trucks running. These guys fix trucks on a daily basis. In fact, it wasn’t until this year that we even started tracking the repair jobs and since May there have been over 200. Most of these repairs are on trucks or tractors, although you would be surprised at the number of restorations that the Johns are responsible for all over the farm. For example, they have been known fix ovens, stoves, cash registers, CSA scales, building repairs, electrical appliances, anything with a motor, weed eaters, welding on market racks, computers, and much more. John P is a long time friend of Farmer John’s, and he tends to pop in almost every day. Jon B has been working here at the farm for a few years now. Together the Johns make quite a dynamic duo; needless to say we are lucky to have them here.

Mark your calendars for our CSA potluck October 16th!
3-5pm, pumpkin picking, 5-7pm potluck! We have a limited supply of pumpkins this year so if people could RSVP with the number of children coming so that we can try to assure that each child will receive a pumpkin that would be great! You can RSVP by e-mail or phone.

Acorn Squash Purée
1 acorn squash
2 eggs
Pinch of nutmeg
Salt and pepper
1 tablespoon butter
3/4 cup toasted pecans, chopped

Cut the squash in half, remove seeds and set cut side down in a buttered glass baking pan with about 1/2 inch of water. Bake at 350 degrees until tender, about 1 hour. When squash is cool enough to handle, scoop out into a food processor and blend until smooth. Add eggs and nutmeg and season to taste. Transfer purée to an ovenproof serving dish. Melt the butter and pour over purée. Sprinkle on pecans. Bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes.

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (Rose Gold)- Steam, roast, fry, mash, you can do just about anything!

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

2 onions (white)– Add to any sauté, or eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad.

Cantaloupe– Eat just like it is!

1 acorn squash– Roast in halves or chunks with salt, pepper, olive oil and/or butter. You can use the acorn squash purée in place of pumpkin for pies, bread and more! (see recipe)

1 bunch of spinach– Sauté quickly in butter or olive oil with salt. Try using garlic and white wine.

2 colored peppers, 1 lipstick pepper— Grill, roast, or just eat raw, they are sweet.

1 shallot– Caramelize, or eat raw. They are wonderful!

Chinese cabbage– make slaw, steam in chunks or add to soup or stew. (see recipe)

Green Leaf lettuce– Make a salad, or add to sandwiches, make lettuce wraps.

Tomatoes (approximately 2 lbs)- Chop raw on salad, or sandwiches.

Stuffed Cabbage
1 Chinese cabbage, outer 12 or so leaves
2 lbs ground meat, sausage, tempeh, or tofu
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 cup cooked brown rice
1 onion or shallot, chopped finely
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon grated ginger
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon red chile flakes
1 bunch cilantro
Salt and pepper
4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
2 tablespoons arrowroot or corn starch mixed with 2 tablespoons cool water (optional)
*Add any vegetables into this recipe for some variations.*

Remove several leaves from the outside of the cabbage and set aside.
Bring 4 quarts of water or so to boil. Blanch the leaves in the water for
about a minute or two, or until the cabbage leaves are malleable. Level out the leaves by cutting some of the thicker stalk part off or slicing it sideways. Anything cut off can be used in the stuffing. In a large skillet, cook the ground meat or tempeh until done to your liking. Add the onions, chopped trimmed cabbage, rice, sesame oil, ginger, soy sauce, chili flakes, and cilantro. Season to taste. Place a spoonful of stuffing in each cabbage leaf, fold in sides and roll up. Arrange in several layers in a ovenproof casserole dish and cover with stock. Bring to a boil and transfer to the oven. Bake at 300 degrees for about an hour. You can serve the rolls just like this, or you could remove the cabbage rolls from the dish, platter them, and place in the oven to keep warm. Bring the remaining stock to a boil and add the arrowroot/water mixture little by little to thicken. Ladle sauce onto cabbage rolls as you serve, or whenever desired.

Chinese cabbage soup
2-3 cups finely chopped cabbage
2 cups finely chopped carrots
1 onion, or shallot chopped
1 cup celery chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
6-8 cups water or stock
Salt and pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil

Heat olive oil up in a large pot. Add onions, garlic, carrots, and celery. Sauté on medium heat for about 5-10 minutes or until cooked halfway through. Add a pinch of salt while cooking. Add a splash of white wine and let it simmer for a minute. Add the stock or water and bring to a boil. Once the vegetables are cooked, add the cabbage and turn the burner off. Salt to taste and serve. Variation: Add 1 cup of finely chopped potato in with the onions. Or try putting chopped pieces of bacon in when you add the onions. Other veggies or seasonings can go great in this soup as well. For a spice, add a pinch of red chili flakes.

Also, if anyone has not been receiving the newsletters in their e-mail and wants to, please let me know by e-mailing me at: csa@gatheringtogetherfarm.com. I’ll get you on the list.