2016 CSA – Week 11: The Case of the Spicy Jimmy Nardello Peppers

CSA Week 11 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 11


The Case of the Spicy Jimmy Nardello Peppers

Twice now, I have prepared what I thought were Jimmy Nardello Sweet Frying Peppers only to find out that they were not sweet, but very spicy!

The first time, I thought it was my error. That I just grabbed what I thought were Nardellos but were actually cayenne or another hot pepper. The second time, I began to wonder if something else might be going on, if this was not an isolated incident.

As it turns out, we planted contaminated seed. These off type plants are interspersed throughout our planting of Jimmy Nardello Peppers. Jolene, the farm manager, says that this is common with open pollinated varieties, pollinated by natural mechanisms such as air, wind, insects, such as the Jimmy Nardello Peppers.

For seed contamination to occur the Jimmy Nardello pepper seed could have been grown near a hot pepper variety or it is possible that it was contaminated by a pollinator or a person that had pollen on them before visiting the Jimmy Nardello patch.

Sometimes these off types or crosses can make for some very interesting and exciting vegetables—a happy accident! However, in the case of the Jimmy Nardello peppers, expecting a sweet pepper and getting a very hot pepper is not my idea of a happy accident. I’ll continue to eat these delicious peppers this season but from now on, I’m going to sample each one before eating!

Have a great week.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Purple Potatoes ($2.25) – These beautiful potatoes are purple inside and out.

☐  2 Anaheim Peppers ($2.25) – Make chili rellenos, stuff them, fry them, or use them in place of lieu of jalapeno

☐  2 Colored Bell Peppers ($2.25) – Grill or broil and use in soups, sandwiches, dips, or salad.

☐  1 lb Green Beans ($4.00) – Delicious tossed in olive oil and salt and grilled or sautéed with caramelized onions, see recipe.

☐  1 Watermelon ($6.75)

☐  1 Shallot ($1.75) – A close relative to onions, shallots tend to have a milder flavor and less of a bite than onions. They are delicious sliced raw or sautéed.

2 Dried Onions ($1.25) – Store in a cool, dry place

☐  Chioggia Bunched Beets ($3.50)

☐  3 Heirloom Tomatoes ($8.00)

☐  4 Ears of Corn ($4.00) – Steam or grill (with husk on) and eat with salt and butter.

Box Market Value: $38.00

 

Recipes

Corn Salad with Tomatoes, Feta and Mint

Fresh raw corn is ideal in this recipe. The juice from the tomatoes delivers just the right amount of acidity, so there’s no need for vinegar. Eat this by the bowl as is or toss it with cooked rice or beans for a more filling salad.

Ingredients

  • 2 to 3 cups raw or cooked corn kernels (from 4 to 6 ears)
  • 1 large or 2 medium ripe tomatoes, cut into fairly small pieces
  • 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (about 1 cup)
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped fresh mint leaves
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Put the corn, tomatoes, and cheese in a medium salad bowl. Drizzle with the olive oil and toss.
  2. Add the mint leaves and toss again. Taste and add salt and pepper. Serve.

Read More: NYTimes Cooking

 

Sautéed Green Beans with Mushrooms and Caramelized Cipollini Onions

Sautéing green beans with caramelized onions is my favorite way to prepare green beans. You can really use any onion and you certainly don’t have to use whole cipollinis. The essentials of this recipe are to caramelize the onions and to blanch the green beans before sautéing.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter or extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 pound cipollini onions, trimmed and peeled
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 pounds green beans, trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
  • 1 medium shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 pound button mushrooms, washed, trimmed, and cut into quarters
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 4 teaspoons)
  • 1 teaspoon picked fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon juice from 1 lemon

Preparation

  1. Melt 3 tablespoons butter (or heat olive oil) in a large non-stick or cast iron skillet over medium heat.
  2. Add cipollini onions, season well with salt and pepper, reduce heat to low, and cook, turning occasionally, until onions are a deep, caramel brown, about 45 minutes total.
  3. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add beans and cook until tender-crisp, about 3 minutes. Drain and run under cool running water until at cold. Set aside.
  4. Heat oil in a large saucepan over high heat until lightly smoking. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, until they’ve released all their liquid and are browned, about 10 minutes total, reducing heat if oil starts to smoke excessively. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Add shallots, garlic, thyme, and remaining tablespoon butter (or olive oil) and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add soy sauce and toss to combine.
  6. Add green beans, onions, and lemon juice to mushrooms and toss to reheat and combine. Serve immediately.

2016 CSA – Week 4: Cooking with Recipes

CSA Week 4 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 4


Cooking with Recipes

I subscribe to cooking magazines and own several cookbooks and I love to read the recipes! However, when it comes to actually cooking, I almost never follow the recipe exactly. If I’m missing an ingredient, I’ll make a substitution or omit it all together. Or if there is something that I have in my fridge that I think would be a good addition to the dish, I’ll throw it in. To me, recipes are more of inspiration or reference rather than a formula. While this can be a risky approach when baking where ratios and ingredients can be critical, there is often a lot of room in for flexibility in recipes in cooking.

As a CSA member, your challenge each week is to utilize the contents of your box to make room for next week. There will be times when recipes you come across, even in the newsletter, call for ingredients that aren’t in your box. I encourage you to be flexible and adaptable. What recipe substitutions can you make to use your ingredients? Are there ingredients in your box that would be a great addition to a recipe that you found?

In the age of the internet, there are so many great digital resources for recipes and food preparation ideas. I have covered a few of my personal favorites in the recipe section.

Happy 4th of July and have a great week!

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

Napa Cabbage ($3.00)

great for stir fry, salad rolls, or coleslaw. See recipe!

Baby Red Onions ($2.50)

Chioggia Bunch Beets ($3.50) Remove greens and sauté or steam. Roast or steam beets. Great with balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre.

Cilantro ($2.00)

Jalapeno pepper ($0.50)

Broccoli ($1.75) Great fresh, sautéed, and in stir-fry

Fennel ($2.00) Use the bulb and fronds too. See recipe

3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads

2-4 zucchini ($3.25) try zucchini pancakes! See recipe.

3 Tomatoes ($4.50)

Box Market Value: $30.25

 

Digital Resources All about Food and Cooking

 Food 52

A site that started with a simple mission: talk about food! This site is a forum for what to cook, how to cook, and recipes too!

NewYorkTimes Cooking

Find cooking techniques, searchable recipes, and gorgeous pictures!

Bon Appétit

A food magazine that follows trends, chefs, and what’s in season. Visit Bon Appétit for trending food news and recipes!

Epicurious

Search their large database of recipes by ingredient or dish. And peruse their articles for ingredient tips and expert advice.

 

Recipes:

Thai Coleslaw with Mint and Cilantro

This fresh take on coleslaw comes to your from Christopher Kimball at Milk Street Kitchen. I made this last week and it was light and delicious. Make a large batch and eat it all week!

Coconut milk offers the right balance of richness and fresh flavor for this Napa cabbage-based coleslaw. Many vegetables worked well, but the combination of sweet sugar snap peas and crispy radishes tested best.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (add more to taste)
  • 1 medium serrano chili, seeded and minced
  • 5 tablespoons coconut milk (not light coconut milk)
  • 1 pound Napa cabbage (1 small head), thinly sliced crosswise (about 8 cups)
  • 6 radishes, trimmed, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces sugar snap peas, strings removed and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh mint
  • ½ cup roasted, salted cashews, coarsely chopped

Instructions

  1. In a liquid measuring cup, combine the lime juice, sugar, fish sauce and chili. Let sit for 10 minutes. Whisk in the coconut milk until combined.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, radishes, peas, cilantro and mint. Add the dressing and toss until evenly coated. Stir in the cashews and serve.

Read More: Milk Street Kitchen

 

Fennel Slaw with Mint Vinaigrette

The sugar helps bring out the natural sweetness of the fennel, don’t leave out!

Ingredients

  • 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 medium bulbs)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar (or honey)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 2 teaspoons minced shallot or onion

Make the vinaigrette: Put the lemon juice, shallot, mustard, salt, sugar and mint in a blender (or use whisk) and pulse briefly to combine. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil until it is well combined.

Shave the fennel into thin slices: Very thinly slice the fennel into 1/8 inch slices starting from the bottom of the bulb (use a mandolin if you have one). Chop some of the fennel fronds as well to toss in with the salad.

Marinate fennel with vinaigrette: Toss with the fennel and marinate for at least an hour. Serve this salad either cold or at room temperature.

Read More: Simplyrecipes.com

 

Zucchini Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups grated zucchini
  • 1/2 cup grated potato
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

 Instructions

  1. Grate zucchini and potato. Let drain in colander for at least 30 minutes. Salt generously.
  2. In a bowl, beat egg, chopped parsley, and lemon zest. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Roll and squeeze zucchini/potato mixture in a towel to soak up moisture.
  4. Combine zucchini / potato mixture with egg mixture. Mix well.
  5. Heat skillet on medium high heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter or olive oil. Drop a spoonful of mixture in pan. Pat with spatula to flatten as much as possible — it’ll be crispier that way.
  6. Cook 2 at a time until golden brown on each side. Serve as soon as possible, with a dollop of sour cream or yogurt on top.

Read More: Food52

 

Lunch Menu: Week of November 4, 2014

ONLY TWO WEEKS LEFT!

What? I know, that’s what I’m saying. How is that possible that we have come to the end of another season?

I have loved thinking and planning and cooking for you all for these last several years. I am grateful that you still want to come and sample what we are cooking/experimenting with. Italy has become a welcome and comfortable inspiration to our menus and plating style. Mille grazie a tutti. We will spend all winter practicing and researching new pastas for next year!

For now come and try some of our comfort food for the cool weather.

jc,

gtf chef

 

Antipasti

salumi plate with cornichon, olives and house mustard and brie cheese 8.5
mixed field greens with balsamic vinaigrette 6.5
GTF salad –roasted delicata, pistachios, blue cheese and parsley vinaigrette 9.5
butternut squash soup with artisan bread 4/6
hearty vegetables & couscous in chicken broth soup with artisan bread 4/6

Pizze Rosso
garlic/oregano/mozzarella 9.5
Italian sausage/delicata/arugula/mozzarella 10.5
kalamata olive/blue cheese/spinach/mozzarella 10.

Pizze Bianco
ham/leeks/gruyere/mozzarella 10.5
kale/peppers/corn/mozzarella 10.
egg/bacon/parsley 10.

–add an egg or anchovies for a dollar
Secondi
tagliatelle with delicata, cavelo nero & fresh tomato sauce 9.5
autumn risotto with chiogga beets, butternut squash & arugula 10
crespelle delicata & besciamella with smashed butternut, kale & basil pesto 10
alpine cheese gratinata with leeks, roasted peppers & cauliflower 9.5
lamb meatballs with roasted potatoes , GTF sauerkraut & house mustard 10.5

CSA 2011 – Week 5: Oh the Places Veggies Go

Yesterday morning was a lovely day in the lettuce field. We had over 500 heads of lettuce to pick, but it was Monday, my personal favorite day, and we were all ready to go. Claudia picked a wonderful head of off-type ‘cardinal’ crisp leaf lettuce that was huge and beautiful. It looked as if an artist had come to paint the shadows of red illuminating over the green heart of it right into the soil in which its roots sprang. Later on in the morning we got into a discussion about all of the possibilities of where the produce could go. When I really get to thinking about it, the options seem endless. Just take a head of romaine lettuce for example. Each week we send romaine lettuce to the eight different weekly markets.

So, this lettuce has the possibility of being eaten by people from Portland all the way down the Willamette Valley and out to Newport. We’ve also been selling lettuce to various restaurants and stores in the area. These may then go to other families, probably within the same areas as the markets. There are also some weeks where a head of romaine lettuce ends up in the CSA boxes – that’s 340 different households! That romaine will then get eaten by folks from the Portland vicinity to Newport, Yachats and back out to Corvallis.

What happens when these CSA members have visitors in town to share the produce with? Then the lettuce may get eaten by someone visiting from a different state or even country. There is always the chance that the lettuce won’t get eaten by a person. A head or two could end up not selling and may be too wilted to save. In this case we would compost it, feed it to Joelene’s chickens, or the neighbor’s pigs. These amazing animals will then turn the lettuce into fertilization and the whole cycle starts over again with compost, soil, a seed, sunshine, and water. That’s just romaine lettuce. Imagine where all the other veggies could end up: carrots, garlic, potatoes, oh my! It seems no matter where they go, something or someone enjoys them, whether it be a family, an employee, a customer, an earthworm, or a pig. That is what makes picking lettuce so fun.

Oh the places they go, the smiles they make!

Farmer of the Week: Kim Lamont
What is your job here at GTF? Farm Stand Manager
When did you start working at GTF? In 1988, I started cleaning garlic for John and Sally; we met at an organic gardening club meeting.
What do you do in your spare time? Play with my grandbaby, Luca, who grew on GTF food!
What would you be doing if you weren’t here?
Making yaro tincture, or picking red clover.
If you were a vegetable what would you be and why? A beet because they’re earthy, cleansing, and sweet at the same time!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (Nicola) – These are best steamed or fried.
Carrots, Bunched – They are great raw, on salad, slaw, or stir-fried.
1 Bunch Baby Onions – Chop the onions and eat raw on salads or soups. The top
green part goes well with eggs, cheese, stir fries or pasta.
1 Bunch Chioggia Beets – You can grate the beets raw on salad or slaw, boil or roast them in water, then peel and eat with greens or on salad. Eat the greens! (see recipe)
1 Pint Sugar Snap Peas – Eat them raw or do a quick sauté with olive oil and salt.
1 Fennel– The bulb is the most desirable part, chop it, and stir fry it or make a raw
salad with it. You can use the whole thing with experimenting – the stalk can be
stringy. (see recipe)
Summer Squash (1lb) – Try them sautéed, grilled, grated raw, soup or stir-fried.
Assorted Lettuce (green or red leaf, green butter, or green oak) – Make a salad, or add to sandwiches.
3 Cucumbers – Eat raw, on salad, or marinate them.
1 Garlic Head – Add it to stir fries, roast whole.
1 Siletz Tomato – Chop raw on salad, eat plain like an apple!
1 pint of Cherries

Recipes:

Marinated Beets

  • Cut the beets off of the greens.
  • Set the greens aside; save and use them by sautéeing or steaming.
  • Boil the beets in salted water for about 30 minutes or until a knife can slide through a beet easily.
  • Strain and let the beets cool until they are cool enough to handle. Peel the skins, they will slide right off.
  • Chop beets into pieces and add extra virgin olive oil, rice wine vinegar, a pinch of salt and a pinch of sugar, honey or maple syrup.
  • Use these as a topping for a salad; they go great with blue or goat cheeses.
  • You can even sauté the beet greens and then add the marinated beets at the very end.

Potato-Fennel Soup (from Moosewood)

1 Tbs. butter or olive oil
1-2 thinly sliced onions
2 tsp. salt
4 medium potatoes (1 lb), chopped
1 cup minced fennel bulb
1/2 tsp caraway seeds
4 cups water or stock
3 cloves garlic, minced
Optional toppings:
Sour cream, or fennel fronds, minced

  • Melt the butter or heat olive oil in large soup pot.
  • Add onions and 1 tsp salt.
  • Cook over medium-low heat, stirring 15-20 minutes or until the onions are very soft and light brown.
  • Add the potatoes, garlic, another pinch of salt, minced fennel bulb, and the caraway seeds.
  • Sauté over medium heat for another 5 minutes, then add the water or stock.
  • Bring to a boil, partially cover and simmer until the potatoes are tender (10-15 minutes).
  • Season to taste