Tag Archives: cilantro

2016 CSA – Week 17: Celeriac

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CSA Newsletter – Week 17


Celeriac: a very delicious, underrated vegetable

The bizarre-looking ball of root in your box this week is actually one of the most delicious flavors of fall. Don’t be deterred by its gnarly, knobby exterior, this fall crop is incredibly delicious when roasted, braised, made into soup, or even raw. If you can get past the unusual exterior and its somewhat cumbersome shape, I promise that celeriac won’t disappoint.

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Celeriac

Celeriac is a bit of a an exotic vegetable in that it is very slow growing and takes most of the growing season to mature. While plantings of such things as lettuce, cilantro, and spinach come and go, celeriac is seeded in late March and is in the ground from June to October. It is somewhat challenging to harvest because of its gnarly root system and it is a bit of a bear to wash because of all those crevices that the roots create.

If you want to sample this truly special vegetable, make it into soup with such things as leeks, apples, and potatoes or a gratin with potatoes. However, my favorite way to prepare celeriac is a bit more indulgent: celeriac fries with homemade mayonnaise. I find that the best way to appreciate its subtle flavor and creamy texture is to eat it on its own. No matter how you prepare celeriac, I hope that eating it is a pleasure!

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Kohlrabi

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  Celeriac ($3.00) – Peal or cut off the outer skin of the celeriac and add to soups, mashed potatoes, or make fries. See recipe.

☐  1 Jester Squash ($2.25) – This squash is a cross between a delicata and an acorn squash. The flesh is most and sweet when cooked and the seeds are delicious roasted as well.

☐  1 Gil’s Golden Pippin Squash ($1.00) – This little acorn squash is delicious and sweet. The skin is thin enough to eat if you like and it is delicious roasted or sautéed.

  Savoy Cabbage ($2.75) – This beautiful cabbage can be used in any cabbage recipe and the leaves are particularly good for stuffing.

☐  2 Colored Peppers ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Golden Beets ($3.50) – Eat the beats and the greens too! Golden beets are delicious on their own or incorporated into a salad.  

☐  1 Bunch Arugula ($3.00) – Arugula is such a versatile green. It is delicious in salads, with eggs, on sandwiches, or even as pesto. See Recipe.

  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.50)

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25) – Kohlrabi is delicious raw and cooked. Peal the outer skin and eat the crunchy, mild inside in salad, dips, or roasted. See Recipe.

☐  Cilantro ($2.00)

☐  1 Tomato ($2.00)

Box Market Value: $27.75

 

Recipes

Garlic & Herb Celeriac Fries

Use any herb combination you like or even just a little salt. For a delicious dip make some aioli or mix pesto with mayonnaise. For a simpler version, skip the boiling step and stick the celeriac fries strait in the oven.

Ingredients

  • 1 celeriac
  • 2 tbsp oil (olive oil or coconut oil works best)
  • 2 tsp oregano
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • salt and pepper
  • 4 stalks of rosemary

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 F.
  2. Peel and cut the celeriac in wedges or fries. Fill a pan with cold water and add the celeriac. Bring to the boil, drain the fries and allow them to steam dry. Add the oregano, garlic, salt and pepper and mix well.
  3. Heat the oil on a baking tray in the oven. When the oil is hot, remove from the oven and add the fries to the tray. Top with the rosemary stalks and return the tray to the oven for 35-40 minutes.

Read More: MyFussyEater

 

Kohlrabi

This may be another unfamiliar vegetable in your box this week. Kohlrabi is in the brassica family along with kale, broccoli, and cabbage. It is delicious raw in salads or slaws, sliced and eaten with hummus or other dips, or roasted. The possibilities are endless!

Roasted Kohlrabi with Parmesan

Ingredients

  • 6 kohlrabi
  • 2 table spoons olive oil
  • ¾ tsp kosher salt
  • a pinch of cayenne (optional)
  • 3 Tbsp. parmesan cheese
  • 1 Tbsp. parsley

Preparation

Peel kohlrabi and cut into 1-inch wedges; toss with olive oil, kosher salt and a pinch of cayenne on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast at 450 F, stirring every 10 minutes, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes. Toss with parmesan and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley.

Read More: FoodNetwork

For more information about Kohlrabi and for a list of kohlrabi recipes, visit SimplyRecipes.

 

Arugula Pesto

Pesto is a great way to preserve the flavors of herbs or greens for later use. Pest is delicious on pasta but also on roasted veggies or mixed with mayonnaise aioli for a delicious dip or dressing.

 Ingredients

  • 2 cups of packed arugula leaves, stems removed
  • 1/2 cup of shelled walnuts
  • 1/2 cup fresh Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, unpeeled
  • 1/2 garlic clove peeled and minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preparation

  1. Brown the garlic: Brown 6 garlic cloves with their peels on in a skillet over medium high heat until the garlic is lightly browned in places, about 10 minutes. Remove the garlic from the pan, cool, and remove the skins.
  2. Toast the nuts: Toast the nuts in a pan over medium heat until lightly brown, or heat in a microwave on high heat for a minute or two until you get that roasted flavor. In our microwave it takes 2 minutes.
  3. Process in food processor: (the fast way) Combine the arugula, salt, walnuts, roasted and raw garlic into a food processor. Pulse while drizzling the olive oil into the processor. Remove the mixture from the processor and put it into a bowl. Stir in the Parmesan cheese.

Adjust to taste: Because the pesto is so dependent on the individual ingredients, and the strength of the ingredients depends on the season or variety, test it and add more of the ingredients to taste.

Read More: SimplyRecipes

2016 CSA – Week 8: The Value of Variety

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CSA Newsletter – Week 8


The Value of Variety

A seemingly simple question was posed to me the other week: Why grow this yellow flying saucer squash when you can just grow a regular green zucchini? In the moment, I didn’t have a great answer, but the question got me thinking about the many reasons that variety and biodiversity are important to our farm system.

On a farm, there are so many factors and considerations that determine what we grow. Of course, we want to grow products that we can sell and that are tasty. Because we sell at a variety of markets, to chefs and restaurants, grocery stores, and directly to people like you, there is a wide variation of products, sizes desired within our broad market creating a diverse demand therefore, more variety means more possibilities of meeting people’s needs. Also, product diversity certainly makes our farmers market setups look beautiful and inviting!

On the farm, the seasons often dictate what we grow, and we can extend seasons by growing varieties that are early season, heat tolerant, overwintering, etc. Other on-farm considerations include days to maturity (how long it takes to grow), yield, ease of harvest, disease resistance, and storability.

In the case of the flying saucer squash, its fun shape and firm, nutty texture make it a squash we’ll continue to grow. With all of the complexities and variables in agriculture, sometimes it’s that simple!

Happy August and enjoy your salsa box!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

2 Poblano Peppers ($2.00) – Stuff as chile rellenos, or incorporate into a potato and corn hash

Bunched Golden Beets ($3.00)

☐ 1 Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

1 Red Torpedo Onion ($1.50) – The long, cylindrical shape of this onion lends itself well to slicing rounds for salad.

☐ 1 Jalapeno ($.50) – Add a little kick to your salsa or pico de gallo

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

Cilantro ($2.00) – Use in salad, salsa, or to garnish any dish

1 lb Tomatillos (4-6) ($3.00) – Roast them and make salsa verde

☐ 4 zucchini ($3.50) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread

2 Big Beef Tomatoes ($4.50)

4 Ears of Corn ($3.00) – Boil or grill and eat straight off the cob or cut off the ear and add to stir-fry or salsa

Box Market Value: $32.25

Recipes

Pico de Gallo

Make this simple, fresh salsa using your tomatoes, white onion, jalapeno, and cilantro.

The tomatoes will most likely be the limiting factor so chop those first and add chopped onions and cilantro to taste. Depending on your heat preference, add chopped jalapeno. Add a little salt and lime and adjust ingredients to taste.

Tomatillo Salsa

Ingredients

  • 5 medium tomatillos
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 serrano chiles (or jalapeno)
  • Handful chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • salt to taste

Preparation

  1. Peel and wash the tomatillos. Split and seed the chiles. Place the tomatillos and chiles under a broiler for about 4 minutes each side.
  2. Transfer the blackened tomatillos, chiles, and any juices from the pan to a blender or food processor. Simply add the rest of the ingredients and blend.
  3. This is the absolute basic recipe. Try adding garlic, cumin, avocado, and/or lime.

Poblano, Potato, and Corn Gratin

This dish is a bit indulgent but potatoes, corn, and poblanos are such a great combination, I couldn’t resist!  For a lighter version, cut the potatoes into chunks, salute with onions and olive oil for 10 minutes and then add the poblanos and corn. Sauté until ingredients are cooked through and add salt and pepper to taste.

 Ingredients

  •  3 teaspoons olive oil, divided
  • 2 large fresh poblano chiles, stemmed, seeded, cut into 2×1/4-inch strips
  • 1 1/4 pounds potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 cup cooked corn, cut off the cob
  • 1 cup coarsely grated Oaxaca cheese or whole-milk mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups half and half
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Rub 9 1/2-inch-diameter deep-dish glass pie dish or cast-iron skillet with 2 teaspoons oil. Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add poblano strips and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. Arrange 1/3 of potato rounds, overlapping slightly, in prepared pie dish. Sprinkle 1/3 of poblano strips over, then 1/3 of corn and 1/3 of cheese. Repeat with 1/3 of potatoes, 1/3 of poblanos, 1/3 of corn, and 1/3 of cheese. Top with remaining potatoes, poblanos, and corn, reserving remaining 1/3 of cheese. Place dish on rimmed baking sheet.
  3. Whisk half and half, flour, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper in small bowl. Pour over potato mixture in pie dish; press potatoes to submerge. Cover dish tightly with foil. Bake 30 minutes. Remove foil; sprinkle remaining cheese over gratin. Continue to bake gratin until potatoes are tender and cheese is golden brown, about 25 minutes longer. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

Read More: Bon Appétit

2016 CSA – Week 4: Cooking with Recipes

CSA Week 4 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 4


Cooking with Recipes

I subscribe to cooking magazines and own several cookbooks and I love to read the recipes! However, when it comes to actually cooking, I almost never follow the recipe exactly. If I’m missing an ingredient, I’ll make a substitution or omit it all together. Or if there is something that I have in my fridge that I think would be a good addition to the dish, I’ll throw it in. To me, recipes are more of inspiration or reference rather than a formula. While this can be a risky approach when baking where ratios and ingredients can be critical, there is often a lot of room in for flexibility in recipes in cooking.

As a CSA member, your challenge each week is to utilize the contents of your box to make room for next week. There will be times when recipes you come across, even in the newsletter, call for ingredients that aren’t in your box. I encourage you to be flexible and adaptable. What recipe substitutions can you make to use your ingredients? Are there ingredients in your box that would be a great addition to a recipe that you found?

In the age of the internet, there are so many great digital resources for recipes and food preparation ideas. I have covered a few of my personal favorites in the recipe section.

Happy 4th of July and have a great week!

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

Napa Cabbage ($3.00)

great for stir fry, salad rolls, or coleslaw. See recipe!

Baby Red Onions ($2.50)

Chioggia Bunch Beets ($3.50) Remove greens and sauté or steam. Roast or steam beets. Great with balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre.

Cilantro ($2.00)

Jalapeno pepper ($0.50)

Broccoli ($1.75) Great fresh, sautéed, and in stir-fry

Fennel ($2.00) Use the bulb and fronds too. See recipe

3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads

2-4 zucchini ($3.25) try zucchini pancakes! See recipe.

3 Tomatoes ($4.50)

Box Market Value: $30.25

 

Digital Resources All about Food and Cooking

 Food 52

A site that started with a simple mission: talk about food! This site is a forum for what to cook, how to cook, and recipes too!

NewYorkTimes Cooking

Find cooking techniques, searchable recipes, and gorgeous pictures!

Bon Appétit

A food magazine that follows trends, chefs, and what’s in season. Visit Bon Appétit for trending food news and recipes!

Epicurious

Search their large database of recipes by ingredient or dish. And peruse their articles for ingredient tips and expert advice.

 

Recipes:

Thai Coleslaw with Mint and Cilantro

This fresh take on coleslaw comes to your from Christopher Kimball at Milk Street Kitchen. I made this last week and it was light and delicious. Make a large batch and eat it all week!

Coconut milk offers the right balance of richness and fresh flavor for this Napa cabbage-based coleslaw. Many vegetables worked well, but the combination of sweet sugar snap peas and crispy radishes tested best.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (add more to taste)
  • 1 medium serrano chili, seeded and minced
  • 5 tablespoons coconut milk (not light coconut milk)
  • 1 pound Napa cabbage (1 small head), thinly sliced crosswise (about 8 cups)
  • 6 radishes, trimmed, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces sugar snap peas, strings removed and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh mint
  • ½ cup roasted, salted cashews, coarsely chopped

Instructions

  1. In a liquid measuring cup, combine the lime juice, sugar, fish sauce and chili. Let sit for 10 minutes. Whisk in the coconut milk until combined.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, radishes, peas, cilantro and mint. Add the dressing and toss until evenly coated. Stir in the cashews and serve.

Read More: Milk Street Kitchen

 

Fennel Slaw with Mint Vinaigrette

The sugar helps bring out the natural sweetness of the fennel, don’t leave out!

Ingredients

  • 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 medium bulbs)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar (or honey)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 2 teaspoons minced shallot or onion

Make the vinaigrette: Put the lemon juice, shallot, mustard, salt, sugar and mint in a blender (or use whisk) and pulse briefly to combine. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil until it is well combined.

Shave the fennel into thin slices: Very thinly slice the fennel into 1/8 inch slices starting from the bottom of the bulb (use a mandolin if you have one). Chop some of the fennel fronds as well to toss in with the salad.

Marinate fennel with vinaigrette: Toss with the fennel and marinate for at least an hour. Serve this salad either cold or at room temperature.

Read More: Simplyrecipes.com

 

Zucchini Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups grated zucchini
  • 1/2 cup grated potato
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

 Instructions

  1. Grate zucchini and potato. Let drain in colander for at least 30 minutes. Salt generously.
  2. In a bowl, beat egg, chopped parsley, and lemon zest. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Roll and squeeze zucchini/potato mixture in a towel to soak up moisture.
  4. Combine zucchini / potato mixture with egg mixture. Mix well.
  5. Heat skillet on medium high heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter or olive oil. Drop a spoonful of mixture in pan. Pat with spatula to flatten as much as possible — it’ll be crispier that way.
  6. Cook 2 at a time until golden brown on each side. Serve as soon as possible, with a dollop of sour cream or yogurt on top.

Read More: Food52

 

CSA 2011 – Week 18: Fun with Fermentation in Your Own Kitchen!

For at least 6000 years now, people have been making sauerkraut and other fermented foods. In fact, in most cultures it would be very rare to eat a meal that does not contain at least one type of fermentation. Bread, cheese, wine, ham, sausage, beer, sauerkraut, pickles, and kimchi – all of these foods are produced through fermentation. Before there were refrigerators, people figured out ways to preserve foods. Salt and time were usually the two main ingredients besides vegetables and fruits.

This type of preserving is called lacto-fermentation. Lactic acid is a natural preservative and keeps bad bacteria away. The lactobacilli found in fermented vegetables makes the vegetables more digestible and increases vitamin levels as well. These organisms produce helpful enzymes, antibiotic and anti-carcinogenic substances. Not only are they super tasty, but they are healthy too! Kimchi and sauerkraut are two of the most popular types of fermented foods around and they are fairly simple to prepare. These dishes may be a great way for some of you to use up your overload cabbage, carrots or onions that you have not gotten to yet! You can make larger batches with an investment in a 4 or 5-gallon bucket or a crock pot. Also, when making these do not use any type of metal container or tool. If you are interested in kraut-making gear, check out Lehman’s catalog!

Sauerkraut
1 medium cabbage, cored and shredded
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
2 tablespoons salt

In a bowl, mix cabbage with caraway seeds and sea salt. Pound with a wooden spoon or a wooden meat pounder for about 10 minutes to release the juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth jar and press down until the juices come to the top of the cabbage. The top of the cabbage should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage. For the ‘cold storage’ you can place it in the refrigerator, or for best results in a place between 40-50 degrees until the kraut has the flavor you are looking for. The sauerkraut may be eaten immediately, but improves with age.

Kimchi 

1 head Napa Cabbage (any cabbage would work), cored and
shredded
1 bunch of green onions, chopped
1 cup carrots, grated
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
3 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
1/2 teaspoon dried chile flakes
2 tablespoons sea salt

Place vegetables, ginger, garlic, red chile flakes, and sea salt in a
bowl and pound with a wooden pounder or wooden meat hammer to release the juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer until juices come to the top of the cabbage. The top of the vegetables should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.

CSA potluck and pumpkin picking this weekend!
Sunday October 16th.
Tour and pumpkin picking: 3-5pm  |  Potluck: 5-7pm
Please RSVP to me at csa@gatheringtogetherfarm.com or call the office: 541-929-4273

Squash Towels! Have any old towels laying around the house that need a new home? Bring them down to GTF! We have been enjoying a wonderful squash washing season and are in need of old towel donations for drying them. We’ll gladly take them off your hands!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (Nicola or rose gold)– Steam, roast, fry, mash; these are versatile.

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

4 onions (2 wallas, 2 candy)– Caramelize, eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad. (see recipe)

2 leeks– After you chop leeks, wash them out a bit before cooking. Dirt seems to get stuck in between the layers of the leeks.

1 buttercup squash– cut in half, place on a sheet pan, flesh side down. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes. Scoop out the inside, puree, season and serve. You can use this in place of pumpkin in any recipe, or even make a soup with it!

1 bunch of collard greens– Sauté in butter or olive oil and salt. Try braised collards.

2 colored peppers—Grill, roast, or just eat raw; they are sweet.

1 purple savoy cabbage– Shred raw and use in slaws or stir fries.

Parsley root– chop into small pieces and use in soups or roasted roots vegetables.

Bulk beets– Boil, then peel, chop, and marinate. Try chopped and fried in olive oil and salt.

1 bunch cilantro– Chop and use in soup, salsa, or try making a cilantro pesto!

Tomatoes (approximately 1 lb)– Chop raw on salad, or sandwiches.

French Onion Soup
2 leeks
4 onions
4 tablespoons butter
2 quarts beef stock or vegetable stock
1/2 cup red wine
1/2 cup cognac
2 tablespoons arrowroot mixed with
2 tablespoons water
Sea salt and pepper

Thinly slice the onions and leeks. Melt the butter in a large stainless
steel pot. Add the onions and cook on the lowest possible heat, stirring occasionally for 2 hours, or until the onions are soft and slightly caramelized. Raise the heat a bit and cook a few minutes longer, stirring frequently. The onions should turn brown but not burn. Add wine, cognac and stock. Bring to a rapid boil and skim off any foam that may rise to the top. Add the arrow root mixture and season to taste. You can top this with homemade croutons and/or
cheese.

Braised Collard Greens
1 bunch collard greens
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves minced garlic
2 strips of bacon, chopped (optional)
Splash of wine (optional)
1-2 cups water or stock
Pinch of salt
2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
Spoonful of molasses
Splash of orange juice (optional)
Pinch of chile flakes

Cook the bacon, onions, and garlic in the olive oil until the onions and garlic start to brown. Add the chopped greens and let cook for a couple of minutes. Deglaze with wine and stock. Let simmer and cook until the greens are nice and tender. Add the orange juice and/or molasses towards the end. Season to taste. Add a pinch of chile flakes for a kick.

Roasted Root Vegetables
3 medium potatoes
4 medium beets
2 chopped medium-sized onions
2 medium or 1 large parsley root
3 cloves of garlic, coarsely chopped
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1-2 teaspoons sea salt
Pinch of pepper
2 tablespoons chopped rosemary

Chop the veggies into quarter size pieces. Coat with olive oil, salt, pepper, rosemary and garlic. Place in a 400 degree oven for about 40-50 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked all the way and they become slightly browned.

CSA 2011 – Week 11: Melon and Tomato Tasting Recap

Well, the delayed heat finally set in last week to help ripen up our outdoor tomatoes and peppers along with our melons too! The melon and tomato tasting was a success as well. About five families showed up to try our offerings, and we took a tour of the farm in the big red truck!

I even learned some new information. For example, we have been having issues with spider mites in the summer for the past couple of years because they thrive and readily reproduce in hot, dry weather. John explained to us that they came up with a new solution this year: running a sprinkler periodically to keep the humidity up. And it works!

We also got a chance to look at the Wild Garden Seed lettuce field. It looks like they have started to harvest some plants out there that were laying down on some white cloth. This time of year the lettuce seed field is just beautiful. Most of the 4-5 foot tall plants are still glowing red, green, purple, or a combination of the three and a lot of them are displaying their white fluffy seed heads. It looks like nothing you’ve ever seen before. Just think, each of those plants will produce hundreds of little lettuce seeds that will then produce more and more lettuce or seed, and it will just continue on and on! We will be having a fall potluck and tour, date to be decided. We’ll keep you posted on that.
Lisa Hargest– CSA coordinator

Words from Sally:
I hope your weekly box is nourishing you and your family. It feels as if the GTF bounty has finally kicked into gear. I think I have “stressed” about this year’s box more than any other year. Again I want to thank you for accepting the challenge of eating with the season or whatever that particular season offers. Joelene, Dan, and I have started to pick the 2nd planting of watermelons as the 1st planting got eaten by our local crow mob. We have four plantings, so be looking for melons in your upcoming boxes. We would love to hear about some of your creative menus from your CSA box!

Enjoy your vegetables!
Sally

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (nicola)– Steam, roast, or mash. These are versatile. (see recipe)

Carrots, bunched – They are great raw, on salad, slaw or stir fried.

2 onions (1 Big Alsea craig white onion, 1 superstar)– Chop the onions and eat raw on salads or soups. They are very good caramelized.

Honey Pearl Melon– Eat just like it is!

1 yellow or orange pepper—Grill, roast, or just eat raw, they are very sweet.

1 Anaheim pepper– Chop raw, and add to salsa, salad, or sauté with summer squash.

1 broccoli – Steam, roast, or grill with salt and olive oil.

2 cucumbers– Chop and add to a salad. Marinate and combine with tomatoes!

1 lb romano, wax, or green beans– Blanch them and then sauté with olive oil, salt, garlic and herbs.

1 globe eggplant– Roast, or pan fry. Try breading and frying for eggplant parmesan.

1 bunch cilantro – Use in salsa, try salsa verde with the tomatillos. It goes well with cucumbers too. (see recipes)

1 garlic – Add to salsa, sautés, or try roasting in skins.

1 jalapeño– Use in salsa, or anything that you would like to spice up!

1 lb tomatillos– Make salsa verde! It’s a wonderful topping for tacos.

Assorted lettuce (oak leaf, romaine, little gem, or crisp leaf) – Make a salad, or add to sandwiches, make lettuce wraps!

Tomatoes (approximately 2 lbs) – Chop raw on salad, or  sandwiches.


Recipes:

Salsa Verde
1 lb tomatillos
1 teaspoon (more or less) chopped jalapeño
1/2 c cilantro, chopped finely
2 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 onion, finely chopped
2 teaspoons lime juice
Pinch of salt

Peel the papery outer husks off of the tomatillos. Simmer them in boiling water for 8-10 minutes, and then peel the skins off. Add the cilantro and garlic and then puree in a food processor or blender. Heat the oil over low heat. Stir in the chopped onion, and jalapeño cooking slowly until slightly wilted. Add the tomatillo mixture, lime juice and the salt. Remove from heat right away, then refrigerate until chilled. Serve chilled. Salsa will keep up to a week in the refrigerator.


Broiled Eggplant Slices

1 globe eggplant
Pinch of sea salt
1/2 cup cilantro marinade

Peel eggplant and slice 3/8 inch thick. Sprinkle with salt and let stand 1 hour. Rinse and pat dry. Place on a well– oiled cookie sheet and brush half the marinate on top of the slices . Broil until golden, turn, brush other side with remaining marinade and broil again.


Cilantro Marinade

1 bunch of cilantro
Juice of 1 lemon
3 garlic cloves
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Mix all of the ingredients together. Refrigerate until needed.

Stuffed Potatoes
6 medium baking potatoes
4 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup crème fraiche or sour cream
1 onion, finely chopped                                                                                     1/2 cup parmesan or cheddar cheese
2-3 tablespoons basil, or parsley, chopped
Salt and pepper

Place whole potatoes in a clay pot, cover and set in a cold oven and turn on to 250 degrees. The potatoes will cook in 2-3 hours depending on their size. Cut butter into cubes and place in a large bowl. When the potatoes are done, cut lengthwise and scoop out soft potato flesh into the bowl with the butter. Mash with a potato masher, mix in cultured cream, cheese, herbs and onions. Season to taste. Spoon the potato mixture back into the shells and return them to a 150– degree oven to keep warm.