2016 CSA – Week 19: River Watch

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CSA Newsletter – Week 19


River Watch Season

As it turns out, we didn’t quite get the storm that we were all anticipating last weekend. However, judging by the satellite imagery and the weather forecast, it looked like we were in for a doozy. After much debate and consideration, we pulled out of all Saturday markets, only attending one out of our typical five weekend markets. If the weather system had landed, it would have been a much different weekend. Nevertheless, we did get a lot of rain, even for Oregon standards.

Last Wednesday, all of the irrigation pumps and pipes were pulled out of the river. During the summer months, the fields are irrigated with river water when there is little rain and the river is low. If we don’t remove the pumps and pipes before the water level rises, they may get washed down the river!

The water level of the Mary’s River, which snakes through the farm, rose a total of 12 feet from 3 feet on Wednesday to 15 feet on Monday morning. And so the season of river watching begins. If the river gets too high, it will spill over into fields and, in a major flood, into our packing area.  It certainly helps to be prepared when high water level is expected so we’ll all be keeping an eye on the river from now on!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Huckleberry Gold Potatoes ($3.00) – Beautiful purple potatoes with yellow flesh that is creamy and buttery. Great as mashed potatoes, roasted, or baked.

☐  2 Delicata Squash ($3.00) – This petite squash so tasty any way you cook it. The skin is tender when cooked; there is no need to peel it. To roast, slice it in half, remove the seeds, and bake face down until tender. You can also sauté or stuff delicata.

☐  Purple Top Turnips ($2.00) – Turnips are surprisingly versatile, delicious root vegetable. You can roast them, mash them, or bake them. They are delicious in soups or on their own.

☐  2 Leeks ($3.25) – Leeks are another versatile vegetable what are delicious sautéed, roasted, and in soups. I even put them on nachos!

  Collard Greens ($3.00) – Collards are a hearty green, similar to kale. Collards are wonderful sautéed with garlic, in soup, or used as a wrap when blanched!

☐  1 Colored Pepper ($2.00)

☐  1 Green Bell Pepper ($1.00)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Celery ($2.50) – This vegetable is bit of a treat on our farm! Celery is wonderful in just about everything from tuna salad, to stuffing, to soup.

☐  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. It is delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $27.00

 

Recipes

Sage & Nut-Stuffed Delicata Squash

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ tsp sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp fresh sage, chopped
  • 1/3 cup lightly toasted pine nuts, chopped
  • 1/3 cup lightly toasted almonds, chopped
  • ½ cup cooked short-grain brown rice or quinoa (I usually cook the rice in vegetable broth for added flavor)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 2 delicata squash, halved lengthwise and seeded

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350° F. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add onions, garlic, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft, about 3 minutes. Stir in sage and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in nuts. Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the rice, eggs, Parmesan, and half of the cheddar cheese. Stir in the nut and onion mixture. Divide the stuffing among the squash halves, sprinkle with the rest of the cheddar cheese, and bake until tender when pierced with a fork and tops are browning, about 45 minutes.

Read More: Food52

 

Soup Basics

Soup is surprisingly easy to make and is a great way to use your vegetables. The variations are endless and you can make it as simple or as sophisticated as you like!

 To start (use what you have):

  1. Sauté: chopped onions, leeks, and/or shallots
  2. When browned, add cubed veggies such as squash, potatoes, turnips, celeriac, celery, and carrots
  3. Add water or stock to cover veggies. (You can also add soup bones or chicken feet for added flavor) Add fresh or dried herbs such as sage, thyme, parsley, oregano etc. Simmer until fragrant, at least one hour.
  4. Add chopped greens a five minutes before the soup is done. This prevents overcooking.

Enjoy!

 

Collard Greens Wraps

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil while you carefully stem the collard greens, trying to keep the leaves intact.
  2. Fill a bowl with ice water.
  3. When the water comes to a boil, salt generously and add the collard leaves in batches.
  4. Blanch two minutes and transfer to the ice water. Drain, gently squeeze out excess water and set aside.
  5. Use in place of a tortilla and add beans and rice or make up your own filling.

Read More: NYT Cooking

CSA 2011 – Week 18: Fun with Fermentation in Your Own Kitchen!

For at least 6000 years now, people have been making sauerkraut and other fermented foods. In fact, in most cultures it would be very rare to eat a meal that does not contain at least one type of fermentation. Bread, cheese, wine, ham, sausage, beer, sauerkraut, pickles, and kimchi – all of these foods are produced through fermentation. Before there were refrigerators, people figured out ways to preserve foods. Salt and time were usually the two main ingredients besides vegetables and fruits.

This type of preserving is called lacto-fermentation. Lactic acid is a natural preservative and keeps bad bacteria away. The lactobacilli found in fermented vegetables makes the vegetables more digestible and increases vitamin levels as well. These organisms produce helpful enzymes, antibiotic and anti-carcinogenic substances. Not only are they super tasty, but they are healthy too! Kimchi and sauerkraut are two of the most popular types of fermented foods around and they are fairly simple to prepare. These dishes may be a great way for some of you to use up your overload cabbage, carrots or onions that you have not gotten to yet! You can make larger batches with an investment in a 4 or 5-gallon bucket or a crock pot. Also, when making these do not use any type of metal container or tool. If you are interested in kraut-making gear, check out Lehman’s catalog!

Sauerkraut
1 medium cabbage, cored and shredded
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
2 tablespoons salt

In a bowl, mix cabbage with caraway seeds and sea salt. Pound with a wooden spoon or a wooden meat pounder for about 10 minutes to release the juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth jar and press down until the juices come to the top of the cabbage. The top of the cabbage should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage. For the ‘cold storage’ you can place it in the refrigerator, or for best results in a place between 40-50 degrees until the kraut has the flavor you are looking for. The sauerkraut may be eaten immediately, but improves with age.

Kimchi 

1 head Napa Cabbage (any cabbage would work), cored and
shredded
1 bunch of green onions, chopped
1 cup carrots, grated
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
3 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
1/2 teaspoon dried chile flakes
2 tablespoons sea salt

Place vegetables, ginger, garlic, red chile flakes, and sea salt in a
bowl and pound with a wooden pounder or wooden meat hammer to release the juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer until juices come to the top of the cabbage. The top of the vegetables should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.

CSA potluck and pumpkin picking this weekend!
Sunday October 16th.
Tour and pumpkin picking: 3-5pm  |  Potluck: 5-7pm
Please RSVP to me at csa@gatheringtogetherfarm.com or call the office: 541-929-4273

Squash Towels! Have any old towels laying around the house that need a new home? Bring them down to GTF! We have been enjoying a wonderful squash washing season and are in need of old towel donations for drying them. We’ll gladly take them off your hands!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (Nicola or rose gold)– Steam, roast, fry, mash; these are versatile.

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

4 onions (2 wallas, 2 candy)– Caramelize, eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad. (see recipe)

2 leeks– After you chop leeks, wash them out a bit before cooking. Dirt seems to get stuck in between the layers of the leeks.

1 buttercup squash– cut in half, place on a sheet pan, flesh side down. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes. Scoop out the inside, puree, season and serve. You can use this in place of pumpkin in any recipe, or even make a soup with it!

1 bunch of collard greens– Sauté in butter or olive oil and salt. Try braised collards.

2 colored peppers—Grill, roast, or just eat raw; they are sweet.

1 purple savoy cabbage– Shred raw and use in slaws or stir fries.

Parsley root– chop into small pieces and use in soups or roasted roots vegetables.

Bulk beets– Boil, then peel, chop, and marinate. Try chopped and fried in olive oil and salt.

1 bunch cilantro– Chop and use in soup, salsa, or try making a cilantro pesto!

Tomatoes (approximately 1 lb)– Chop raw on salad, or sandwiches.

French Onion Soup
2 leeks
4 onions
4 tablespoons butter
2 quarts beef stock or vegetable stock
1/2 cup red wine
1/2 cup cognac
2 tablespoons arrowroot mixed with
2 tablespoons water
Sea salt and pepper

Thinly slice the onions and leeks. Melt the butter in a large stainless
steel pot. Add the onions and cook on the lowest possible heat, stirring occasionally for 2 hours, or until the onions are soft and slightly caramelized. Raise the heat a bit and cook a few minutes longer, stirring frequently. The onions should turn brown but not burn. Add wine, cognac and stock. Bring to a rapid boil and skim off any foam that may rise to the top. Add the arrow root mixture and season to taste. You can top this with homemade croutons and/or
cheese.

Braised Collard Greens
1 bunch collard greens
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves minced garlic
2 strips of bacon, chopped (optional)
Splash of wine (optional)
1-2 cups water or stock
Pinch of salt
2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
Spoonful of molasses
Splash of orange juice (optional)
Pinch of chile flakes

Cook the bacon, onions, and garlic in the olive oil until the onions and garlic start to brown. Add the chopped greens and let cook for a couple of minutes. Deglaze with wine and stock. Let simmer and cook until the greens are nice and tender. Add the orange juice and/or molasses towards the end. Season to taste. Add a pinch of chile flakes for a kick.

Roasted Root Vegetables
3 medium potatoes
4 medium beets
2 chopped medium-sized onions
2 medium or 1 large parsley root
3 cloves of garlic, coarsely chopped
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1-2 teaspoons sea salt
Pinch of pepper
2 tablespoons chopped rosemary

Chop the veggies into quarter size pieces. Coat with olive oil, salt, pepper, rosemary and garlic. Place in a 400 degree oven for about 40-50 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked all the way and they become slightly browned.

Late Fall CSA Box 2011

Cannot bear to think of what you are going to do when your vegetable boxes end? Fret no longer…

We are offering a late fall CSA! These boxes will be perfect for those of you who love root crops such as carrots, beets, turnips, celeriac, parsnips and potatoes! It will also include winter greens: kale, collards, chard, bok choy, and cabbage. Winter squash, leeks, and onions will be included in these boxes as well, along with a bag of salad mix every week!

We will be able to offer 2 pickup sites on Saturdays only:

1) Portland Saturday Market
2) the GTF Farm
We may be able to add another pickup location in Corvallis if someone has a nice sheltered garage or space by their house that they could offer.
It will run for 4 weeks, from November 19th-December 10th, $100 for 4 weeks.