2016 CSA – Week 13: Making Compost

CSA Week 13 Graphic

CSA Newsletter  – Week 13


Making Compost: Recycling Nutrients on the Farm

Three times a week, our barn crew dumps accumulated organic material from the barn and kitchen. This organic material includes kitchen scraps and things like over ripe tomatoes, cabbage leaves, leek tops, wormy potatoes and beets, limp carrots, to name a few. While not a glamorous job, the compost is a very vital part to our soil fertility.

Recycled plant material is only a portion of the composition of our compost. We haul rabbit, cow, and hoarse manure from neighboring farms as well, leaf matter from the city of Corvallis in the fall and weathered hay bales.  The vegetative material from cover crops, picked through corn rows, etc is also incorporated into the compost.

The compost is tended in long rows that are turned with a tractor powered implement. The rows are turned 2-3 times a week for 4 weeks until they are cooked. Another 4-6 months of curing is optimal but doesn’t always occur. Because of the wet conditions during the winter months, compost must be stockpiled in the fall to carry the farm through the wet season.

The finished compost is used in our propagation house soil mix and is spread on fields in preparation for planting.

Making compost, a dirty job that helps us grow beautiful produce!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Purple Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  3 Colored Peppers ($4.00)

☐  1 Jalapeno Pepper ($0.50) – Some folks on the farm prefer a few hot peppers in the morning rather than a cup of coffee. For the rest of us, incorporate this pepper into any dip, sauté, or salsa for a bit of heat.

  1 lb Green Beans ($4.00) – Sauté with caramelized onions and garlic or blanch and freeze for the winter!

☐  1 Cucumber ($1.00)

☐  1 Honey Orange Melon ($3.00) – Delicious sliced and eaten right off the rind, wrapped in prosciutto, in salad, or blended in a cocktail.

☐  2 Leeks ($4.00)

☐  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.50) – Serve fresh in salads, on sandwiches, or caramelize and serve with sautéed veggies.

  Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  1 Eggplant ($3.50)

☐  3 Big Beef Tomatoes ($7.00) – Slice, cook in herbed butter, and serve with fried eggs or make a savory galette. See recipe!

Box Market Value: $36.25


RECIPE

Tomato, Corn and Cheese Galette with Fresh Basil

I’ve dedicated the whole recipe section to this recipe because it sounds so delicious! Sweet galettes are often my go to desert because of their versatility. I don’t often think to make savory galettes although I think I’ll make my own rendition of this recipe soon. Galettes are perfect for fall because there is still an abundance of produce and it is cool enough to bake in the oven! If you’re feeling adventurous, try adding other fillings using the same method. Enjoy!

Cornmeal Galette Dough

1-1/4 cups (5 oz.) all-purpose flour
1/3 cup (1-1/2 oz.) fine yellow cornmeal
1 tsp. sugar
1-1/4 tsp. salt
6 T. (3 oz.) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces and chilled
3 T. olive oil
1/4 cup ice water

In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt. Cut in the chilled butter using a stand mixer, a food processor, or a pastry blender until it’s evenly distributed but still in large, visible pieces. Add the olive oil and ice water and mix until the dough begins to come together. Gather the dough with your hands and shape it into a disk. Wrap the disk in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Finishing the tart:

  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 large white onion (or leek), thinly sliced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 1/2 bunch basil or tarragon, coarsely chopped, (to yield about 1/2 cup); plus 10 whole leaves
  • Kernels from 1 ear of corn (about 1 cup)
  • Cornmeal Galette Dough (see above)
  • 1 large or 2 medium ripe tomatoes (about 3/4 lb. total) cut into 1/3-inch slices, drained on paper towels
  • 3 oz. Gruyère cheese, shredded
  1. Heat the olive oil in a sauté pan, over medium heat. Add the sliced onion and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 10 min. Season with salt and pepper. Add the garlic, chopped basil, and corn and cook for 30 seconds. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and set aside to cool.
  2. Adjust an oven rack to the center position and heat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with kitchen parchment.
  3. Roll the dough on a floured surface into a 15-inch round, lifting the dough with a metal spatula as you roll to make sure it’s not sticking. If it is, dust the surface with more flour. Transfer it by rolling it around the rolling pin and unrolling it on the lined baking sheet.
  4. Spread the onion and corn mixture over the dough, leaving a 2-inch border without filling. Sprinkle the cheese over the onions and corn. Arrange the tomatoes in a single layer over the cheese and season them with salt and pepper. Lift the edges of the dough and fold them inward over the filling, pleating as you go, to form a folded-over border. Pinch together any tears in the dough. Brush the egg yolk and milk mixture over the exposed crust.
  5. Bake until the crust has browned and the cheese has melted, 35 to 45 min. Slide the galette off the parchment and onto a cooling rack. Let cool for 10 min. Stack the remaining 10 basil leaves and use a sharp knife to cut them into a chiffonade. Cut the galette into wedges, sprinkle with the basil, and serve.

Read more: Alexandra Cooks

 

July 9th Market Recipes

Here’s what we sampled up down at the waterfront yesterday!

  • The Lazy Man’s Pickle: Cucumbers with Dill and Lemon (July 2nd post)
  • Tomato Basil Salad (July 2nd post)20160706_085140 double purple cherokee label (2)
    • New Alteration: For those of you who came to market earlier in the day, this plate was made with Siletz tomatoes as it was on July 2nd. But later in the day, we decided to shake it up a bit and make the same dish with Purple Cherokee Heirloom tomatoes, which have a wonderfully unique flavor and a beautiful dark color.
  • Spinach Basil Salad (June 25th post)
    • I made this salad for dinner after market, along with thick slices of Siletz tomato and fresh mozzarella-like cheese from La Mariposa, a wonderful cheese vendor at the Corvallis Farmers Market. It was amazing! I highly recommend it.20160924_112541-2

NEW RECIPES:

  • Hot Chioggia Beet Salad (May 7th post)
    • New Alteration: The only difference here is that I used Chioggia beets, which have a white and red concentric circle design in the center. They tend to have a more mild beet flavor, and unlike typical red beets, they don’t turn everything you have dark pink. Also, they’re simply gorgeous, and that is reason enough to try them out. Sadly, I did not get a photograph of this dish before the people of Corvallis gobbled it up, but you can see a chioggia beet here.20160709_103448 (2)
  • Yellow Straightneck Squash with Red Mustard Greens
    • Ingredients:
      • 2-3 Pearl Onions, sliced thin or however you would like them
      • 1/2 head Garlic, minced
      • 4-5 Yellow Straightneck Squash, sliced thin into discs (They’re just like yellow crookneck squash, only… you guessed it, the neck is straight.)
      • 1 bunch Red Mustard Greens
      • Olive oil
      • Salt & Pepper to taste
    • Directions:
      • Pre-chop the onion and garlic.
      • Coat the pan in olive oil and heat up to medium-high until a piece of onion in the oil starts sizzling.
      • Add in the onion and garlic and stir around in the oil.
      • Slice up the squash into discs, and add them into the pan once you’re done. Stir around to coat in oil, adding more oil if need be. Let cook 5-8 minutes, stirring around occasionally for even cooking.
      • Roughly chop up a bunch of red mustard greens. With the heat that we’ve been having lately, our mustard greens have been getting spicier every day. Their lovely peppery flavor is especially delicious when paired with the creamy combination of garlic and summer squash.
      • Add in a couple pinches of both salt and pepper, and stir around. Let cook just 2-3 minutes more.
      • Let cool a few minutes and taste to see how your salt levels are, adjusting accordingly. This dish looks beautiful with the bright yellow squash and dark green leaves, and would be wonderful with rice and grilled chicken or tempeh. Enjoy!

 

June 25th Market Recipes – Spinach Basil Salad and Fresh Pico de Gallo

Summer is officially here, and with it has come another slew of seasonal produce. It’s now that time of year when a few quick chops is all that stands between you and a meal of simple fresh food. The following recipes focus on quick raw dishes that can be enjoyed without turning on the stove, although I did break down and cook up some zucchini, I just missed it so much all winter.

  • Fresh Cucumber with Lemon and Salt20160622_090504 (2) 700 pixels wide
  • Fresh Kohlrabi with Lemon and Salt (June 4th post)
  • Cocozelle Squash Sauté with Black Kale and Garlic
  • Spinach Basil Salad
  • Pico de Gallo

FRESH CUCUMBER WITH LEMON AND SALT:

Cucumber season is in full swing! Eat them whole like an apple, slice them up with lemon and salt, mince them into a salad- cucumbers are good for everything.

COCOZELLE SQUASH SAUTE WITH BLACK KALE AND GARLIC:20160625_104941 (2)

Summer squash and garlic are soul mates, and when they are together, deliciousness is sure to result. Many people asked me, “One head of garlic? You must mean 1 clove?” No sir, no ma’am, I mean one head! Though garlic is most commonly treated as a seasoning, I prefer to treat it as a vegetable as it provides a savory flavor that makes vegetarian dishes feel especially filling. Feel free to add as much as or as little as you wish! I used Cocozelle in this dish, a type of zucchini that has thicker skin which helps the squash maintain its form without getting mushy in the pan.

  • 3 Cocozelle Summer Squash, sliced into discs
  • 1/2 Willamette Sweet Onion, finely chopped
  • 1 head Garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch Lacinato Black Kale, roughly chopped
  • Olive oil
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Coat the bottom of the pan in olive oil and bring it up to medium-high heat.
  2. Once up to temperature, add in the chopped onion and cook for 2 minutes.
  3. Add in sliced squash and garlic, stirring around to coat everything in oil. Sauté for about 7 minutes.
  4. Stir in the black kale and add a couple pinches of salt. Sauté for about 3 minutes. Timing is somewhat key here, as we don’t want the squash to get mushy. Make sure to add in the kale while the squash is still a little bit raw so that both the kale and the squash finish cooking about the same time in the pan.
  5. My favorite way to eat this dish is for breakfast topped with two fried eggs and some hot sauce. However it is also delicious along side rice and chicken, or just by itself.

SPINACH BASIL SALAD:20160625_104933 (2)

Spinach is not the biggest fan of hot weather, so I made this dish in an effort to enjoy it in its prime before we all have to go a month or two without its tender greens in our lives.

  • 1 bunch Spinach, roughly chopped
  • 2/3 bunch Basil, finely chopped
  • ~6 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • ~4 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/4 Willamette Sweet Onion, minced
  • Salt to taste, 2-3 pinches

Directions:

  1. Mince the garlic and onion and place them in a medium bowl.
  2. Pour the olive oil, salt, and balsamic vinegar into the bowl, and mash the onion and garlic into the dressing a bit with the back of a spoon. This is the magic secret! All those onion and garlic juices will release into your dressing making it incredibly flavorful.
  3. Chop up the spinach and basil and toss them in the dressing.
  4. This salad is delicious as is, although if you let it sit 10-15 minutes before serving, the vinegar will break down the spinach a bit making for an extremely tender salad.

PICO DE GALLO:20160625_115024 (2)

Pico de Gallo is one of my main dinners during the summer. All you have to do is roughly chop up the following ingredients, dump them all in a bowl, and mix them around. Serve with tortilla chips, on top of tacos, or if you’re crazy like me, grab a spoon and experience just how fresh summer can taste. You’ll notice from this picture that I like my pico with heavy quantities of onion; for those of you who prefer less onion, feel free to add less.

  • 4 medium Tomatoes
  • 1 medium-large Willamette Sweet Onion
  • 2-3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro
  • 1/3 bunch Basil
  • Lemon Juice to taste
  • Salt to taste

CSA 2011 – Week 11: Melon and Tomato Tasting Recap

Well, the delayed heat finally set in last week to help ripen up our outdoor tomatoes and peppers along with our melons too! The melon and tomato tasting was a success as well. About five families showed up to try our offerings, and we took a tour of the farm in the big red truck!

I even learned some new information. For example, we have been having issues with spider mites in the summer for the past couple of years because they thrive and readily reproduce in hot, dry weather. John explained to us that they came up with a new solution this year: running a sprinkler periodically to keep the humidity up. And it works!

We also got a chance to look at the Wild Garden Seed lettuce field. It looks like they have started to harvest some plants out there that were laying down on some white cloth. This time of year the lettuce seed field is just beautiful. Most of the 4-5 foot tall plants are still glowing red, green, purple, or a combination of the three and a lot of them are displaying their white fluffy seed heads. It looks like nothing you’ve ever seen before. Just think, each of those plants will produce hundreds of little lettuce seeds that will then produce more and more lettuce or seed, and it will just continue on and on! We will be having a fall potluck and tour, date to be decided. We’ll keep you posted on that.
Lisa Hargest– CSA coordinator

Words from Sally:
I hope your weekly box is nourishing you and your family. It feels as if the GTF bounty has finally kicked into gear. I think I have “stressed” about this year’s box more than any other year. Again I want to thank you for accepting the challenge of eating with the season or whatever that particular season offers. Joelene, Dan, and I have started to pick the 2nd planting of watermelons as the 1st planting got eaten by our local crow mob. We have four plantings, so be looking for melons in your upcoming boxes. We would love to hear about some of your creative menus from your CSA box!

Enjoy your vegetables!
Sally

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (nicola)– Steam, roast, or mash. These are versatile. (see recipe)

Carrots, bunched – They are great raw, on salad, slaw or stir fried.

2 onions (1 Big Alsea craig white onion, 1 superstar)– Chop the onions and eat raw on salads or soups. They are very good caramelized.

Honey Pearl Melon– Eat just like it is!

1 yellow or orange pepper—Grill, roast, or just eat raw, they are very sweet.

1 Anaheim pepper– Chop raw, and add to salsa, salad, or sauté with summer squash.

1 broccoli – Steam, roast, or grill with salt and olive oil.

2 cucumbers– Chop and add to a salad. Marinate and combine with tomatoes!

1 lb romano, wax, or green beans– Blanch them and then sauté with olive oil, salt, garlic and herbs.

1 globe eggplant– Roast, or pan fry. Try breading and frying for eggplant parmesan.

1 bunch cilantro – Use in salsa, try salsa verde with the tomatillos. It goes well with cucumbers too. (see recipes)

1 garlic – Add to salsa, sautés, or try roasting in skins.

1 jalapeño– Use in salsa, or anything that you would like to spice up!

1 lb tomatillos– Make salsa verde! It’s a wonderful topping for tacos.

Assorted lettuce (oak leaf, romaine, little gem, or crisp leaf) – Make a salad, or add to sandwiches, make lettuce wraps!

Tomatoes (approximately 2 lbs) – Chop raw on salad, or  sandwiches.


Recipes:

Salsa Verde
1 lb tomatillos
1 teaspoon (more or less) chopped jalapeño
1/2 c cilantro, chopped finely
2 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 onion, finely chopped
2 teaspoons lime juice
Pinch of salt

Peel the papery outer husks off of the tomatillos. Simmer them in boiling water for 8-10 minutes, and then peel the skins off. Add the cilantro and garlic and then puree in a food processor or blender. Heat the oil over low heat. Stir in the chopped onion, and jalapeño cooking slowly until slightly wilted. Add the tomatillo mixture, lime juice and the salt. Remove from heat right away, then refrigerate until chilled. Serve chilled. Salsa will keep up to a week in the refrigerator.


Broiled Eggplant Slices

1 globe eggplant
Pinch of sea salt
1/2 cup cilantro marinade

Peel eggplant and slice 3/8 inch thick. Sprinkle with salt and let stand 1 hour. Rinse and pat dry. Place on a well– oiled cookie sheet and brush half the marinate on top of the slices . Broil until golden, turn, brush other side with remaining marinade and broil again.


Cilantro Marinade

1 bunch of cilantro
Juice of 1 lemon
3 garlic cloves
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Mix all of the ingredients together. Refrigerate until needed.

Stuffed Potatoes
6 medium baking potatoes
4 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup crème fraiche or sour cream
1 onion, finely chopped                                                                                     1/2 cup parmesan or cheddar cheese
2-3 tablespoons basil, or parsley, chopped
Salt and pepper

Place whole potatoes in a clay pot, cover and set in a cold oven and turn on to 250 degrees. The potatoes will cook in 2-3 hours depending on their size. Cut butter into cubes and place in a large bowl. When the potatoes are done, cut lengthwise and scoop out soft potato flesh into the bowl with the butter. Mash with a potato masher, mix in cultured cream, cheese, herbs and onions. Season to taste. Spoon the potato mixture back into the shells and return them to a 150– degree oven to keep warm.

CSA 2011 – Week 9: If I Had a CSA Box I Would…

I’ve decided to take this week to tell you how I would use all of the produce in a CSA box.
Candy Onions: I would caramelize them like the recipe on the back and then combine them with the sautéed green beans.
Beans: see recipe on back.

Potatoes: Boil them and mash them with butter and cream. You could also chop them into 2– inch pieces, toss in olive oil, salt, garlic and herbs. Roast them at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. Try boiling them whole, let them cool and then grate them to make potato pan-cakes or pan-fried hash browns.

Green Pepper: My favorite way to eat these is grilled or roasted whole until the outside gets slightly charred. You can then peel the pepper or not and add it to a sandwich with arugula-basil pesto, lettuce and tomato.

Squash: Summer squash is wonderful chopped in half, coated with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and salt and then grilled. Another way of preparing it is to chop it into thin strips and toss it in olive oil and salt and roast it at 375 degrees for about 20 minutes or until cooked thoroughly. I also hear that you can grate it raw and freeze it for later zucchini breads. Another CSA member told me she likes to chop the squash and layer it in a casserole dish with cheese and other veggies and bake it!

Cucumber: I like cucumbers raw dipped in hummus or salad dressings of some sort. The salad dressing on the back would be a perfect cucumber dip.

Arugula: Arugula is a tasty salad green. You can eat it raw with dressing (see recipe on back). Another great way to use the Arugula is in pesto with basil. I usually split the basil and arugula half and half so that you get to taste both equally. Their flavors complement each other well. This pesto goes nicely on a sandwich, as a dip or even as the base for a pesto pasta of some sort. I tend to like arugula slightly wilted as well because it cuts the spicy bitter edge that it tends to have. Try it wilted on top of pizza.

Romaine Lettuce: I really enjoy the grilled Caesar salad that I put a recipe for a few weeks ago. Romaine is a great crispy lettuce with a nice mild flavor. It goes well on sandwiches, or as salad. A woman I work with just suggested making lettuce rolls with the large leaves. You could stuff these with some tomato, pesto, and cucumbers. If you’re a meat eater, add some bacon! Mushrooms and cheese might go nicely as well.

Carrots: I enjoy these carrots as they are, raw! I know some CSA members who cut them up into carrot sticks for the week. Try them grated raw with raisins, oil and vinegar.

Basil: I am a huge pesto fan personally, but there are many ways to use basil. In fact, basil is a great addition to an Asian stir fry of squash, green beans, and carrots with soy sauce, sesame oil and seeds, some chili flakes and served over rice. Also, try making a tomato salad, or use in the salad dressing recipe.

Blueberries: Eat them raw, make a smoothie, or add them to pancakes!

Tomatoes: Eat them raw on salad. Combine with pesto. You could even try them stuffed with cheese and herbs and baked at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

What’s in the box?

…I suppose you just found out. 🙂

 

Recipes:

Simply Green Beans
1 lb green beans
2 cloves of garlic, chopped
2 Tablespoons Parsley or herbs chopped (optional)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt

First take both ends off of the beans simply by snapping and put beans into a bowl. Blanch beans quickly in salted boiling water for about 1-2 minutes. Heat olive oil in a pan and add beans and garlic. Add herbs last and season to taste. For extra flavor add butter at the very end. To spice it up, add some chili flakes.

Candy Onion Compote
2 candy onions, peeled and sliced thinly
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil

Cook the onions in butter and olive oil on low heat for 30 minutes or more. Onions will turn a light brown color and develop a caramel taste. Use this as a topping for most savory dishes. Variations: Add thinly chopped carrots and/or summer squash or green pepper for more variety.

Arugula and Romaine Salad with Roasted Tomato Dressing
Dressing:
1 large tomato or a few small tomatoes
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 cup basil leaves, chopped
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of salt

Chop the tomato into 3-4 larger pieces, and roast in the oven at 400 degrees for about 30-45 minutes or until somewhat dried out, but not dark. Place tomatoes in a blender or food processor. On low speed, add garlic and vinegar. Drizzle in olive oil, add the basil last and salt to taste.

Use this dressing on top of washed and chopped Arugula and Romaine together. The
romaine will balance out the spice of the Arugula and the sweetness of the dressing will compliment the two. Add the other tomato chopped on top, the cucumber or even blanched green beans.