2016 CSA – Week 19: River Watch

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CSA Newsletter – Week 19


River Watch Season

As it turns out, we didn’t quite get the storm that we were all anticipating last weekend. However, judging by the satellite imagery and the weather forecast, it looked like we were in for a doozy. After much debate and consideration, we pulled out of all Saturday markets, only attending one out of our typical five weekend markets. If the weather system had landed, it would have been a much different weekend. Nevertheless, we did get a lot of rain, even for Oregon standards.

Last Wednesday, all of the irrigation pumps and pipes were pulled out of the river. During the summer months, the fields are irrigated with river water when there is little rain and the river is low. If we don’t remove the pumps and pipes before the water level rises, they may get washed down the river!

The water level of the Mary’s River, which snakes through the farm, rose a total of 12 feet from 3 feet on Wednesday to 15 feet on Monday morning. And so the season of river watching begins. If the river gets too high, it will spill over into fields and, in a major flood, into our packing area.  It certainly helps to be prepared when high water level is expected so we’ll all be keeping an eye on the river from now on!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Huckleberry Gold Potatoes ($3.00) – Beautiful purple potatoes with yellow flesh that is creamy and buttery. Great as mashed potatoes, roasted, or baked.

☐  2 Delicata Squash ($3.00) – This petite squash so tasty any way you cook it. The skin is tender when cooked; there is no need to peel it. To roast, slice it in half, remove the seeds, and bake face down until tender. You can also sauté or stuff delicata.

☐  Purple Top Turnips ($2.00) – Turnips are surprisingly versatile, delicious root vegetable. You can roast them, mash them, or bake them. They are delicious in soups or on their own.

☐  2 Leeks ($3.25) – Leeks are another versatile vegetable what are delicious sautéed, roasted, and in soups. I even put them on nachos!

  Collard Greens ($3.00) – Collards are a hearty green, similar to kale. Collards are wonderful sautéed with garlic, in soup, or used as a wrap when blanched!

☐  1 Colored Pepper ($2.00)

☐  1 Green Bell Pepper ($1.00)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Celery ($2.50) – This vegetable is bit of a treat on our farm! Celery is wonderful in just about everything from tuna salad, to stuffing, to soup.

☐  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. It is delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $27.00

 

Recipes

Sage & Nut-Stuffed Delicata Squash

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ tsp sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp fresh sage, chopped
  • 1/3 cup lightly toasted pine nuts, chopped
  • 1/3 cup lightly toasted almonds, chopped
  • ½ cup cooked short-grain brown rice or quinoa (I usually cook the rice in vegetable broth for added flavor)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 2 delicata squash, halved lengthwise and seeded

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350° F. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add onions, garlic, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft, about 3 minutes. Stir in sage and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in nuts. Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the rice, eggs, Parmesan, and half of the cheddar cheese. Stir in the nut and onion mixture. Divide the stuffing among the squash halves, sprinkle with the rest of the cheddar cheese, and bake until tender when pierced with a fork and tops are browning, about 45 minutes.

Read More: Food52

 

Soup Basics

Soup is surprisingly easy to make and is a great way to use your vegetables. The variations are endless and you can make it as simple or as sophisticated as you like!

 To start (use what you have):

  1. Sauté: chopped onions, leeks, and/or shallots
  2. When browned, add cubed veggies such as squash, potatoes, turnips, celeriac, celery, and carrots
  3. Add water or stock to cover veggies. (You can also add soup bones or chicken feet for added flavor) Add fresh or dried herbs such as sage, thyme, parsley, oregano etc. Simmer until fragrant, at least one hour.
  4. Add chopped greens a five minutes before the soup is done. This prevents overcooking.

Enjoy!

 

Collard Greens Wraps

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil while you carefully stem the collard greens, trying to keep the leaves intact.
  2. Fill a bowl with ice water.
  3. When the water comes to a boil, salt generously and add the collard leaves in batches.
  4. Blanch two minutes and transfer to the ice water. Drain, gently squeeze out excess water and set aside.
  5. Use in place of a tortilla and add beans and rice or make up your own filling.

Read More: NYT Cooking

2016 CSA – Week 17: Celeriac

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CSA Newsletter – Week 17


Celeriac: a very delicious, underrated vegetable

The bizarre-looking ball of root in your box this week is actually one of the most delicious flavors of fall. Don’t be deterred by its gnarly, knobby exterior, this fall crop is incredibly delicious when roasted, braised, made into soup, or even raw. If you can get past the unusual exterior and its somewhat cumbersome shape, I promise that celeriac won’t disappoint.

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Celeriac

Celeriac is a bit of a an exotic vegetable in that it is very slow growing and takes most of the growing season to mature. While plantings of such things as lettuce, cilantro, and spinach come and go, celeriac is seeded in late March and is in the ground from June to October. It is somewhat challenging to harvest because of its gnarly root system and it is a bit of a bear to wash because of all those crevices that the roots create.

If you want to sample this truly special vegetable, make it into soup with such things as leeks, apples, and potatoes or a gratin with potatoes. However, my favorite way to prepare celeriac is a bit more indulgent: celeriac fries with homemade mayonnaise. I find that the best way to appreciate its subtle flavor and creamy texture is to eat it on its own. No matter how you prepare celeriac, I hope that eating it is a pleasure!

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Kohlrabi

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  Celeriac ($3.00) – Peal or cut off the outer skin of the celeriac and add to soups, mashed potatoes, or make fries. See recipe.

☐  1 Jester Squash ($2.25) – This squash is a cross between a delicata and an acorn squash. The flesh is most and sweet when cooked and the seeds are delicious roasted as well.

☐  1 Gil’s Golden Pippin Squash ($1.00) – This little acorn squash is delicious and sweet. The skin is thin enough to eat if you like and it is delicious roasted or sautéed.

  Savoy Cabbage ($2.75) – This beautiful cabbage can be used in any cabbage recipe and the leaves are particularly good for stuffing.

☐  2 Colored Peppers ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Golden Beets ($3.50) – Eat the beats and the greens too! Golden beets are delicious on their own or incorporated into a salad.  

☐  1 Bunch Arugula ($3.00) – Arugula is such a versatile green. It is delicious in salads, with eggs, on sandwiches, or even as pesto. See Recipe.

  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.50)

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25) – Kohlrabi is delicious raw and cooked. Peal the outer skin and eat the crunchy, mild inside in salad, dips, or roasted. See Recipe.

☐  Cilantro ($2.00)

☐  1 Tomato ($2.00)

Box Market Value: $27.75

 

Recipes

Garlic & Herb Celeriac Fries

Use any herb combination you like or even just a little salt. For a delicious dip make some aioli or mix pesto with mayonnaise. For a simpler version, skip the boiling step and stick the celeriac fries strait in the oven.

Ingredients

  • 1 celeriac
  • 2 tbsp oil (olive oil or coconut oil works best)
  • 2 tsp oregano
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • salt and pepper
  • 4 stalks of rosemary

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 F.
  2. Peel and cut the celeriac in wedges or fries. Fill a pan with cold water and add the celeriac. Bring to the boil, drain the fries and allow them to steam dry. Add the oregano, garlic, salt and pepper and mix well.
  3. Heat the oil on a baking tray in the oven. When the oil is hot, remove from the oven and add the fries to the tray. Top with the rosemary stalks and return the tray to the oven for 35-40 minutes.

Read More: MyFussyEater

 

Kohlrabi

This may be another unfamiliar vegetable in your box this week. Kohlrabi is in the brassica family along with kale, broccoli, and cabbage. It is delicious raw in salads or slaws, sliced and eaten with hummus or other dips, or roasted. The possibilities are endless!

Roasted Kohlrabi with Parmesan

Ingredients

  • 6 kohlrabi
  • 2 table spoons olive oil
  • ¾ tsp kosher salt
  • a pinch of cayenne (optional)
  • 3 Tbsp. parmesan cheese
  • 1 Tbsp. parsley

Preparation

Peel kohlrabi and cut into 1-inch wedges; toss with olive oil, kosher salt and a pinch of cayenne on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast at 450 F, stirring every 10 minutes, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes. Toss with parmesan and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley.

Read More: FoodNetwork

For more information about Kohlrabi and for a list of kohlrabi recipes, visit SimplyRecipes.

 

Arugula Pesto

Pesto is a great way to preserve the flavors of herbs or greens for later use. Pest is delicious on pasta but also on roasted veggies or mixed with mayonnaise aioli for a delicious dip or dressing.

 Ingredients

  • 2 cups of packed arugula leaves, stems removed
  • 1/2 cup of shelled walnuts
  • 1/2 cup fresh Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, unpeeled
  • 1/2 garlic clove peeled and minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preparation

  1. Brown the garlic: Brown 6 garlic cloves with their peels on in a skillet over medium high heat until the garlic is lightly browned in places, about 10 minutes. Remove the garlic from the pan, cool, and remove the skins.
  2. Toast the nuts: Toast the nuts in a pan over medium heat until lightly brown, or heat in a microwave on high heat for a minute or two until you get that roasted flavor. In our microwave it takes 2 minutes.
  3. Process in food processor: (the fast way) Combine the arugula, salt, walnuts, roasted and raw garlic into a food processor. Pulse while drizzling the olive oil into the processor. Remove the mixture from the processor and put it into a bowl. Stir in the Parmesan cheese.

Adjust to taste: Because the pesto is so dependent on the individual ingredients, and the strength of the ingredients depends on the season or variety, test it and add more of the ingredients to taste.

Read More: SimplyRecipes

2016 CSA – Week 13: Making Compost

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CSA Newsletter  – Week 13


Making Compost: Recycling Nutrients on the Farm

Three times a week, our barn crew dumps accumulated organic material from the barn and kitchen. This organic material includes kitchen scraps and things like over ripe tomatoes, cabbage leaves, leek tops, wormy potatoes and beets, limp carrots, to name a few. While not a glamorous job, the compost is a very vital part to our soil fertility.

Recycled plant material is only a portion of the composition of our compost. We haul rabbit, cow, and hoarse manure from neighboring farms as well, leaf matter from the city of Corvallis in the fall and weathered hay bales.  The vegetative material from cover crops, picked through corn rows, etc is also incorporated into the compost.

The compost is tended in long rows that are turned with a tractor powered implement. The rows are turned 2-3 times a week for 4 weeks until they are cooked. Another 4-6 months of curing is optimal but doesn’t always occur. Because of the wet conditions during the winter months, compost must be stockpiled in the fall to carry the farm through the wet season.

The finished compost is used in our propagation house soil mix and is spread on fields in preparation for planting.

Making compost, a dirty job that helps us grow beautiful produce!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Purple Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  3 Colored Peppers ($4.00)

☐  1 Jalapeno Pepper ($0.50) – Some folks on the farm prefer a few hot peppers in the morning rather than a cup of coffee. For the rest of us, incorporate this pepper into any dip, sauté, or salsa for a bit of heat.

  1 lb Green Beans ($4.00) – Sauté with caramelized onions and garlic or blanch and freeze for the winter!

☐  1 Cucumber ($1.00)

☐  1 Honey Orange Melon ($3.00) – Delicious sliced and eaten right off the rind, wrapped in prosciutto, in salad, or blended in a cocktail.

☐  2 Leeks ($4.00)

☐  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.50) – Serve fresh in salads, on sandwiches, or caramelize and serve with sautéed veggies.

  Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  1 Eggplant ($3.50)

☐  3 Big Beef Tomatoes ($7.00) – Slice, cook in herbed butter, and serve with fried eggs or make a savory galette. See recipe!

Box Market Value: $36.25


RECIPE

Tomato, Corn and Cheese Galette with Fresh Basil

I’ve dedicated the whole recipe section to this recipe because it sounds so delicious! Sweet galettes are often my go to desert because of their versatility. I don’t often think to make savory galettes although I think I’ll make my own rendition of this recipe soon. Galettes are perfect for fall because there is still an abundance of produce and it is cool enough to bake in the oven! If you’re feeling adventurous, try adding other fillings using the same method. Enjoy!

Cornmeal Galette Dough

1-1/4 cups (5 oz.) all-purpose flour
1/3 cup (1-1/2 oz.) fine yellow cornmeal
1 tsp. sugar
1-1/4 tsp. salt
6 T. (3 oz.) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces and chilled
3 T. olive oil
1/4 cup ice water

In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt. Cut in the chilled butter using a stand mixer, a food processor, or a pastry blender until it’s evenly distributed but still in large, visible pieces. Add the olive oil and ice water and mix until the dough begins to come together. Gather the dough with your hands and shape it into a disk. Wrap the disk in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Finishing the tart:

  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 large white onion (or leek), thinly sliced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 1/2 bunch basil or tarragon, coarsely chopped, (to yield about 1/2 cup); plus 10 whole leaves
  • Kernels from 1 ear of corn (about 1 cup)
  • Cornmeal Galette Dough (see above)
  • 1 large or 2 medium ripe tomatoes (about 3/4 lb. total) cut into 1/3-inch slices, drained on paper towels
  • 3 oz. Gruyère cheese, shredded
  1. Heat the olive oil in a sauté pan, over medium heat. Add the sliced onion and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 10 min. Season with salt and pepper. Add the garlic, chopped basil, and corn and cook for 30 seconds. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and set aside to cool.
  2. Adjust an oven rack to the center position and heat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with kitchen parchment.
  3. Roll the dough on a floured surface into a 15-inch round, lifting the dough with a metal spatula as you roll to make sure it’s not sticking. If it is, dust the surface with more flour. Transfer it by rolling it around the rolling pin and unrolling it on the lined baking sheet.
  4. Spread the onion and corn mixture over the dough, leaving a 2-inch border without filling. Sprinkle the cheese over the onions and corn. Arrange the tomatoes in a single layer over the cheese and season them with salt and pepper. Lift the edges of the dough and fold them inward over the filling, pleating as you go, to form a folded-over border. Pinch together any tears in the dough. Brush the egg yolk and milk mixture over the exposed crust.
  5. Bake until the crust has browned and the cheese has melted, 35 to 45 min. Slide the galette off the parchment and onto a cooling rack. Let cool for 10 min. Stack the remaining 10 basil leaves and use a sharp knife to cut them into a chiffonade. Cut the galette into wedges, sprinkle with the basil, and serve.

Read more: Alexandra Cooks

 

2016 CSA – Week 10: Onion Harvest…Waiting for the Flop

CSA Week 10 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 10


Onion Harvest: Waiting for the Flop

In early spring, we seeded about 800 flats of onions and shallots in the greenhouse (that’s over 19,000 onions!). These guys have spent the summer growing in the fields and now the tops are beginning to flop. This is an indication that they are done growing. Once the majority of the onions have flopped, they are pulled, by hand, from the ground and laid on the soil surface for a few days. This allows the roots to dry, decreasing the chance of rot
during storage.

The onions are then loaded onto trucks and transported from the field into greenhouses for curing. Curing allows the onion to dry and for a protective skin to form. We typically let them cure for at least one week, sometimes longer if we are busy harvesting other crops! Once the onions have
dried, the tops and roots are trimmed and they are placed in wooden crates for storage. If the crop is healthy and the storage conditions are right, these onions will last through the beginning of next year. You can never have too many onions in my book!

Have a great week.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

☐ Lettuce ($2.00)
☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)
☐ 1 Eggplant ($4.50) – See the recipes for a delicious eggplant sauce.
☐ 2 Colored Bell Peppers ($4.00) – Grill or broil and use in soups, sandwiches,
dips, or salad.
☐ 1 Red Cipollini onion ($1.00) – Cipollinis are lovely roasted or caramelized and can be used in any recipe calling for onion.
☐ 1 White Cipollini onion ($1.00)
☐ 2 Dried Sweet onions ($1.25) – Store in a cool, dry place.
☐ 1 Fennel Bulb ($2.00) – For fennel lovers, use the fronds as the greens in
your favorite pesto recipe.
☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)
☐ 2-3 Zucchini ($2.50)
☐ 1 lb Romano Beans ($4.00) – Substitute these beans for green beans in any
recipe. Delicious blanched or sautéed.
☐ 3 lbs Heirloom Tomatoes (3) ($12.00) – You can’t go wrong with these beautiful tomatoes. Sandwiches, caprese salad, pasta, or slice, salt, and eat with a knife and fork!
☐ 4 Ears of Corn ($4.00) – Picked by farmer John himself. Steam or grill
(with husk on) and eat with salt and butter. For a culinary adventure, make fresh polenta!

Box Market Value: $44.00

 

Recipes

Ottolenghi’s Eggplant Sauce

This recipe is adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s book Plenty. The full recipe includes making a fresh corn polenta which is topped with this sauce. However, the sauce sounded so good it seems that it would be delicious on just about anything! Check out the full recipe at Food 52.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 medium eggplant, cut into 3/4-inch dice
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • 1/4cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup chopped peeled tomatoes (fresh or canned)
  • 6 1/2tablespoons water
  • 1/4teaspoon salt
  • 1/4teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped oregano

Preparation

  1. Heat up the oil in a large saucepan and fry the eggplant on medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until nicely brown.
  2. Drain off as much oil as you can and discard it — the safest way to do this is to scoop out the eggplant to a plate using a slotted spoon, then pour off the oil into a bowl before added the eggplant back in. You can save the oil to fry lamb chops or eggs in tomorrow.
  3. Add the tomato paste to the pan and stir with the eggplant.
  4. Cook for 2 minutes, then add the wine and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add the chopped tomatoes, water, salt, sugar and oregano and cook for a further 5 minutes to get a deep-flavored sauce.
  6. Set aside; warm it up when needed.


Jalapeno Corn Fritters

This is not the type of thing that I would make regularly, but a good fritter sure is delicious! For a slightly lighter version, omit the bacon and cheese.

 Ingredients

  • 3 c. fresh corn
  • 2/3 c. cornmeal
  • 1/4 c. shredded Cheddar
  • 1/4 c. cream cheese
  • 2 scallions, sliced
  • 2 slices cooked bacon, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 jalapeño, finely diced
  • kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil or canola oil
  • Juice of 1 lime, divided
  • Sour cream, for serving

Preparation

  1. In a medium bowl, combine corn, cornmeal, cheddar, cream cheese, scallions, bacon, eggs, the juice of half a lime, and jalapeño.
  2. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper to taste. Using your hands, form the mixture into small patties.
  3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  4. Working in batches, fry the patties until they’re golden brown, about 3 to 4 minutes per sidee.

Read More: Delish

2016 CSA – Week 3: Succession Planting

CSA Box

CSA Newsletter – Week 3


Succession Planting – extending the harvest

While storage crops such as beets, parsnips, and winter squash, can be harvested at one time and sold gradually, berries or tomatoes can be frozen; many of our crops must be harvested right before being sold. Each Monday and Friday, first thing in the morning, the barn crew goes out into the fields to harvest head lettuce to be sold to restaurants, at market, and to go into your CSA boxes. In order to have a constant supply of mature lettuce each week, we plan for successive plantings of lettuce.

Starting in February and continuing through August, a lettuce planting is seeded every week in the greenhouse, 27 plantings in all. Each planting consists of around 80 flats of romaine, butter, oak and little gem head lettuces as well as specialized varieties for the salad mix. That equates to around 13,000 lettuce plants per week! This weekly planting cycle starts a reoccurring cycle of tasks: thinning of newly germinated plants, transplanting of lettuce once the plants have reached the proper maturity, and then finally, harvest of the mature lettuce heads.  As we harvest the plantings each week, we make room in the fields for other crops to be planted, and the cycle continues.

Enjoy your lettuce and the rest of the veggies in your box!

– Lily Walton, CSA Coordinator

We’d love to see what you’re doing with your CSA box! Share your photos with us on Facebook and Instagram (@gatheringtogetherfarm) and #gtfcsa or send me an email and I’d be happy to share them.

 

Table of Box Contents:

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Red Potatoes ($4.50) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

Spinach ($3.00) Eat fresh in salads or sauté

Scallions ($2.00)Great in green salads, eggs, and on the grill!

Bunch Carrots ($3.50) Remove tops for storage. Eat them fresh, roast them, or add them to stir fry.

3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads

2 zucchini ($2.00) cut into 2 inch pieces and sauté with onions, garlic, or both

2 Dried Sweet Onions ($3.00)

Fresh Dill ($2.00) Add to potato salad, salad dressing, and even savory scones

Sugarloaf Chicory ($3.00) Try it fresh! See the recipes

1 Tomato ($2.50)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $30.50

 

Love the Loaf

Sugar Loaf chicory, or pan di Zucchero in Italian, is one of my favorite greens. Yes, you can braise it or sauté it, but if I’m not drizzling it with balsamic and olive oil and throwing it on the grill, I’m eating it in a salad. If you’ve eaten our salad mix, chances are you’ve eaten sugar loaf chicory raw too! Taste is a very individual sense, but I would encourage you to try chicories raw! Their texture and crunch is wonderful and their flavor is crisp and, yes, a tad bitter. Cut the bitterness with an acidic dressing using such things as lemon juice or balsamic vinegar (any vinegar for that matter).  Add elements of sweetness by putting fresh or dried fruit in your salad. If you’re still not convinced that eating raw chicory is for you, then definitely fire up the grill for a smoky, braised loaf.

 

Recipes:

Make your own Vinaigrette Salad Dressing

The possibilities are endless with salad dressing! I like to make the dressing in the same bowl that I am serving the salad in, before I add the greens.

The basic ratio is 3:1, oil to acid (vinegar, lemon juice, etc)

Preparation
In a bowl, add a pinch of salt to the acid and whisk to dissolve

  • (Optional) add an emulsifier such as Dijon mustard, egg or egg yolk, crushed garlic, or mayonnaise
  • Slowly add the oil while whisking until the dressing reaches the desired flavor and consistency
  • (Optional) Add flavor elements such as fresh herbs, minced or thinly sliced onion or shallots, etc

I like let some ingredients such as onions, carrots, or radishes marinate in the dressing before I toss the salad. In the case of chicories, I would toss the salad and let it marinate for a few minutes before eating.

Learn more about dressings and how to make them:

Cooks Illustrated Make Ahead Vinaigrette

Epicurious Homemade salad dressing recipes and tips

 

Cucumber Potato Salad

 Make use of your potatoes, dill, cucumber and onions with this potato salad recipe adapted from Sunset Magazine. Thinly sliced scallions would be a great addition to the salad or they could replace the onion all together.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds small red potatoes
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped fresh dill
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups slivered red onion, rinsed and patted dry
  • 1 cucumber, very thinly sliced

Preparation

1. Bring 1 in. water to a boil in a saucepan. Set whole potatoes in a steamer basket and steam in pan, covered, until tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Cool in ice water, then pat dry.

2. Whisk yogurt, mayonnaise, dill, vinegar, salt, and pepper in a small bowl to combine.

3. Quarter potatoes and put in a large bowl. Add onion, cucumber, and half the dressing; gently stir to coat. Add more dressing if you like, or save to use as a dip.

Make ahead: Up to 2 days through step 2. Chill potatoes a dressing separately and slice cucumber just before serving.