2016 CSA – Week 13: Making Compost

CSA Week 13 Graphic

CSA Newsletter  – Week 13


Making Compost: Recycling Nutrients on the Farm

Three times a week, our barn crew dumps accumulated organic material from the barn and kitchen. This organic material includes kitchen scraps and things like over ripe tomatoes, cabbage leaves, leek tops, wormy potatoes and beets, limp carrots, to name a few. While not a glamorous job, the compost is a very vital part to our soil fertility.

Recycled plant material is only a portion of the composition of our compost. We haul rabbit, cow, and hoarse manure from neighboring farms as well, leaf matter from the city of Corvallis in the fall and weathered hay bales.  The vegetative material from cover crops, picked through corn rows, etc is also incorporated into the compost.

The compost is tended in long rows that are turned with a tractor powered implement. The rows are turned 2-3 times a week for 4 weeks until they are cooked. Another 4-6 months of curing is optimal but doesn’t always occur. Because of the wet conditions during the winter months, compost must be stockpiled in the fall to carry the farm through the wet season.

The finished compost is used in our propagation house soil mix and is spread on fields in preparation for planting.

Making compost, a dirty job that helps us grow beautiful produce!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Purple Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  3 Colored Peppers ($4.00)

☐  1 Jalapeno Pepper ($0.50) – Some folks on the farm prefer a few hot peppers in the morning rather than a cup of coffee. For the rest of us, incorporate this pepper into any dip, sauté, or salsa for a bit of heat.

  1 lb Green Beans ($4.00) – Sauté with caramelized onions and garlic or blanch and freeze for the winter!

☐  1 Cucumber ($1.00)

☐  1 Honey Orange Melon ($3.00) – Delicious sliced and eaten right off the rind, wrapped in prosciutto, in salad, or blended in a cocktail.

☐  2 Leeks ($4.00)

☐  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.50) – Serve fresh in salads, on sandwiches, or caramelize and serve with sautéed veggies.

  Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  1 Eggplant ($3.50)

☐  3 Big Beef Tomatoes ($7.00) – Slice, cook in herbed butter, and serve with fried eggs or make a savory galette. See recipe!

Box Market Value: $36.25


RECIPE

Tomato, Corn and Cheese Galette with Fresh Basil

I’ve dedicated the whole recipe section to this recipe because it sounds so delicious! Sweet galettes are often my go to desert because of their versatility. I don’t often think to make savory galettes although I think I’ll make my own rendition of this recipe soon. Galettes are perfect for fall because there is still an abundance of produce and it is cool enough to bake in the oven! If you’re feeling adventurous, try adding other fillings using the same method. Enjoy!

Cornmeal Galette Dough

1-1/4 cups (5 oz.) all-purpose flour
1/3 cup (1-1/2 oz.) fine yellow cornmeal
1 tsp. sugar
1-1/4 tsp. salt
6 T. (3 oz.) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces and chilled
3 T. olive oil
1/4 cup ice water

In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt. Cut in the chilled butter using a stand mixer, a food processor, or a pastry blender until it’s evenly distributed but still in large, visible pieces. Add the olive oil and ice water and mix until the dough begins to come together. Gather the dough with your hands and shape it into a disk. Wrap the disk in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Finishing the tart:

  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 large white onion (or leek), thinly sliced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 1/2 bunch basil or tarragon, coarsely chopped, (to yield about 1/2 cup); plus 10 whole leaves
  • Kernels from 1 ear of corn (about 1 cup)
  • Cornmeal Galette Dough (see above)
  • 1 large or 2 medium ripe tomatoes (about 3/4 lb. total) cut into 1/3-inch slices, drained on paper towels
  • 3 oz. Gruyère cheese, shredded
  1. Heat the olive oil in a sauté pan, over medium heat. Add the sliced onion and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 10 min. Season with salt and pepper. Add the garlic, chopped basil, and corn and cook for 30 seconds. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and set aside to cool.
  2. Adjust an oven rack to the center position and heat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with kitchen parchment.
  3. Roll the dough on a floured surface into a 15-inch round, lifting the dough with a metal spatula as you roll to make sure it’s not sticking. If it is, dust the surface with more flour. Transfer it by rolling it around the rolling pin and unrolling it on the lined baking sheet.
  4. Spread the onion and corn mixture over the dough, leaving a 2-inch border without filling. Sprinkle the cheese over the onions and corn. Arrange the tomatoes in a single layer over the cheese and season them with salt and pepper. Lift the edges of the dough and fold them inward over the filling, pleating as you go, to form a folded-over border. Pinch together any tears in the dough. Brush the egg yolk and milk mixture over the exposed crust.
  5. Bake until the crust has browned and the cheese has melted, 35 to 45 min. Slide the galette off the parchment and onto a cooling rack. Let cool for 10 min. Stack the remaining 10 basil leaves and use a sharp knife to cut them into a chiffonade. Cut the galette into wedges, sprinkle with the basil, and serve.

Read more: Alexandra Cooks

 

2016 CSA – Week 11: The Case of the Spicy Jimmy Nardello Peppers

CSA Week 11 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 11


The Case of the Spicy Jimmy Nardello Peppers

Twice now, I have prepared what I thought were Jimmy Nardello Sweet Frying Peppers only to find out that they were not sweet, but very spicy!

The first time, I thought it was my error. That I just grabbed what I thought were Nardellos but were actually cayenne or another hot pepper. The second time, I began to wonder if something else might be going on, if this was not an isolated incident.

As it turns out, we planted contaminated seed. These off type plants are interspersed throughout our planting of Jimmy Nardello Peppers. Jolene, the farm manager, says that this is common with open pollinated varieties, pollinated by natural mechanisms such as air, wind, insects, such as the Jimmy Nardello Peppers.

For seed contamination to occur the Jimmy Nardello pepper seed could have been grown near a hot pepper variety or it is possible that it was contaminated by a pollinator or a person that had pollen on them before visiting the Jimmy Nardello patch.

Sometimes these off types or crosses can make for some very interesting and exciting vegetables—a happy accident! However, in the case of the Jimmy Nardello peppers, expecting a sweet pepper and getting a very hot pepper is not my idea of a happy accident. I’ll continue to eat these delicious peppers this season but from now on, I’m going to sample each one before eating!

Have a great week.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Purple Potatoes ($2.25) – These beautiful potatoes are purple inside and out.

☐  2 Anaheim Peppers ($2.25) – Make chili rellenos, stuff them, fry them, or use them in place of lieu of jalapeno

☐  2 Colored Bell Peppers ($2.25) – Grill or broil and use in soups, sandwiches, dips, or salad.

☐  1 lb Green Beans ($4.00) – Delicious tossed in olive oil and salt and grilled or sautéed with caramelized onions, see recipe.

☐  1 Watermelon ($6.75)

☐  1 Shallot ($1.75) – A close relative to onions, shallots tend to have a milder flavor and less of a bite than onions. They are delicious sliced raw or sautéed.

2 Dried Onions ($1.25) – Store in a cool, dry place

☐  Chioggia Bunched Beets ($3.50)

☐  3 Heirloom Tomatoes ($8.00)

☐  4 Ears of Corn ($4.00) – Steam or grill (with husk on) and eat with salt and butter.

Box Market Value: $38.00

 

Recipes

Corn Salad with Tomatoes, Feta and Mint

Fresh raw corn is ideal in this recipe. The juice from the tomatoes delivers just the right amount of acidity, so there’s no need for vinegar. Eat this by the bowl as is or toss it with cooked rice or beans for a more filling salad.

Ingredients

  • 2 to 3 cups raw or cooked corn kernels (from 4 to 6 ears)
  • 1 large or 2 medium ripe tomatoes, cut into fairly small pieces
  • 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (about 1 cup)
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped fresh mint leaves
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Put the corn, tomatoes, and cheese in a medium salad bowl. Drizzle with the olive oil and toss.
  2. Add the mint leaves and toss again. Taste and add salt and pepper. Serve.

Read More: NYTimes Cooking

 

Sautéed Green Beans with Mushrooms and Caramelized Cipollini Onions

Sautéing green beans with caramelized onions is my favorite way to prepare green beans. You can really use any onion and you certainly don’t have to use whole cipollinis. The essentials of this recipe are to caramelize the onions and to blanch the green beans before sautéing.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter or extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 pound cipollini onions, trimmed and peeled
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 pounds green beans, trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
  • 1 medium shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 pound button mushrooms, washed, trimmed, and cut into quarters
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 4 teaspoons)
  • 1 teaspoon picked fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon juice from 1 lemon

Preparation

  1. Melt 3 tablespoons butter (or heat olive oil) in a large non-stick or cast iron skillet over medium heat.
  2. Add cipollini onions, season well with salt and pepper, reduce heat to low, and cook, turning occasionally, until onions are a deep, caramel brown, about 45 minutes total.
  3. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add beans and cook until tender-crisp, about 3 minutes. Drain and run under cool running water until at cold. Set aside.
  4. Heat oil in a large saucepan over high heat until lightly smoking. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, until they’ve released all their liquid and are browned, about 10 minutes total, reducing heat if oil starts to smoke excessively. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Add shallots, garlic, thyme, and remaining tablespoon butter (or olive oil) and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add soy sauce and toss to combine.
  6. Add green beans, onions, and lemon juice to mushrooms and toss to reheat and combine. Serve immediately.

2016 CSA – Week 9: Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie

CSA Week 9 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – week 9


Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie Mobile

One of the things that I love about farming is the constant need for innovation. Challenges arise on a daily basis and it takes creativity and ingenuity to move forward — constant problem solving.

Farmer John Eveland has had a longstanding innovation challenge that came to fruition last week with the inaugural trip of the GTF Mobile Veggie Truck. John hopes that this truck will help the farm bring veggies to folks in under-served areas without regular access to fresh, organic produce.

Since acquiring a retired bottled water truck a few years ago, John has been working away at retrofitting the truck as a veggie mobile. This meant installing pop up awnings, custom built in pop out displays, oh and giving the retired truck’s engine a bit of a tune up!

It has certainly been a shared project as our agronomist took on the task of fabricating the awnings, a local carpenter designed and built the pop out displays, and two local artists painted a beautiful mural on the back.

It is really fun to see that after many years of farming, there are always new, exciting things on the horizon.

Have a wonderful week!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐ Green Cabbage ($4.50)

1 Colored Bell Pepper ($2.00) – Grill or broil pepper halves. Let cool and remove skin. Use to make in salads, eggs, on sandwiches, or make romesco.

☐ 2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75)

1 Dried Red Onion ($0.75)

1 Sweet Italian Pepper ($1.00) – Eat fresh in salads, grill, or sauté. Substitute in any recipe calling for bell peppers.

☐ 2 Jimmy Nardello Peppers ($1.25) – Great for sautéing or frying, see recipe.

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

½ lb Spinach ($4.50)

☐ 4 Zucchini ($3.50)

¾ lbs Green Beans ($3.00) – Blanch or sauté plain or season with bacon, garlic, butter, lemon juice, or make garlic and ginger string beans (see recipe).

2 Tomatoes (~1 lb) ($3.00)

1 Pint Cherry Tomatoes ($3.50)

Box Market Value: $36.50

 

Recipes

Beyond the Bell Pepper: Jimmy Nardello Sweet Italian Frying Pepper

This variety was brought to the US in the late 1800’s by an Italian family and was grown by them for almost 100 years. The seed was donated to the seed savers exchange in 1983, before Jimmy Nardello passed away at the age of 81.

The Jimmy Nardello pepper has a characteristic scrunch towards the stem and has thinner flesh than the more common bell peppers. This thin flesh lends itself well to frying rather than roasting as with bell type sweet peppers.

Fried Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  1. Slice peppers in half lengthwise (removing seeds optional)
  2. Heat olive oil in a frying pan on medium-low heat
  3. Add the peppers to the frying pan stirring constantly until the skins are blistered and the peppers are slightly wilted, 6-8 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and serve.

Serving Suggestions:

  • Sauté with garlic (add at the end of cooking) and/or other herbs such as parsley.
  • Pairs well with a soft cheese such as goat chèvre, fresh mozzarella, burrata.
  • Also delicious served on top of steak.

 

String Beans with Ginger and Garlic

Sometimes a very simple recipe is the best way to enjoy such high quality, fresh food. This NYT cooking recipe is simple and delicious. If you’re not inspired by garlic and ginger, use the bean preparation technique and season your beans with something else to your liking. This recipe can easily be adjusted to a larger quantity of beans.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pounds string beans (French-style slim haricots verts work especially well), trimmed
  • 1 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger (about 2 inches ginger root, peeled)
  • 1 medium-size garlic clove, minced

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and fill a large bowl with ice water. Boil beans until just tender but still crisp and bright green. Start testing after 4 minutes or so, being careful not to overcook. When done, plunge beans into ice water to stop cooking, lift out immediately when cool and drain on towels. (Recipe can be made to this point up to a day in advance and kept refrigerated, wrapped in towels.)
  2. When ready to cook, heat oil in a wide skillet over high heat. Add beans, ginger and garlic, and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until beans are heated through and ginger and garlic are softened and aromatic. Sprinkle with salt, and remove to a serving dish.

Read More: NYT Cooking

 

2016 CSA – Week 6: Mechanical Cultivation

CSA Week 6 Graphic

CSA Newsletter  – Week 6


Mechanical Cultivation: Keeping our fields well groomed

In passing, our logistics coordinator and cultivator extraordinaire, Joey, was lamenting about not wanting to get back on the tractor to cultivate in the afternoon. I don’t blame him, long days spent in the hot sun; meticulously driving through row after row of crops is tedious and straining.  However, cultivation is a very essential part of our weed management program and can make or break the success of a crop.

This time of year, we have a dedicated crew of cultivators who spend much of their days riding classic International and Farmall cultivation tractors,  from the 50’s and 60’s, through fields, the walking the fine line of effective cultivation and uprooting the very plants we are trying to protect. Like so many things in farming, timing is everything. If a crop (or the weeds) grows too large, the cultivation implement may not be able to run through the crop safely. Alternatively, if a crop is too small when cultivated, the plants may get buried in the processes, adversely impacting their success.  With new crops being planted weekly, there is never a shortage of things to cultivate. Often, the limiting factor is hours in the day.

Anything that does not get cultivated by tractor gets cultivated and weeded by hand. Our skilled field crew can knock out a weedy planting pretty quick if it’s all hands on deck, but with much of the harvest coming on, hand weeding often takes a back seat to harvesting mature crops ready for sale.

So thank you to the cultivation crew for taking one for the team and keeping our fields looking beautiful and weed free (reduced)!

Have a great week and enjoy those veggies.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

¾ Lbs Green Beans ($3.00)

Bunched Red Shallots ($2.50) – Delicious in eggs, salad, or grilled

2 Fresh Sweet Onion ($3.00)

1 Eggplant ($4.50) – Best eaten soon after harvest. Delicious roasted or charred, in dips, ragu, or as eggplant parmesan.

Bunch Carrots ($3.50) – Remove tops for storage

Fresh Dill ($2.00)

Green Bell Pepper ($1.50)

Dried Garlic ($1.50)

2-3 Summer Squash ($3.00) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread.

3 Cucumbers ($3.00)

1 lb Tomatoes (2-3) ($3.50)

Box Market Value: $35.25

 

Recipes

Lisa’s Turkish Eggplant Dish

 Lisa, a dear friend of the farm and former CSA Coordinator, is also a wonderful cook. I remembered tasting her eggplant dip when she made it last year and I am so excited to share it with you this week (and to have the recipe for myself)!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 eggplant
  • 1 (plus a bit) tablespoons butter
  • 1-2 cloves garlic (depending on size)
  • 1/3 to 2/3 cup yogurt
  • salt to taste

PREPARATION

  1. Place whole eggplant on grill (even straight on the coals)or in very hot oven until black. Let cool.
  2. Lightly sauté garlic in butter not allowing it to turn brown or black.
  3. Peel eggplant and chop into chunks.
  4. Add eggplant to garlic butter mixture and cook on medium low for about 5 minutes.
  5. Add yogurt and salt to taste.


Seasoned Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise is one of my favorite condiments for grilled or roasted vegetables. It is incredibly versatile and can be dressed up in endless ways. Make your own mayo or use the jar from the fridge. Don’t be shy, a little mayo never hurt anybody and you’ll be surprised at how delicious it tastes!

Flavors (try combinations too!):

  • Roasted garlic (raw too!)
  • Sriracha
  • Mustard
  • Fresh Herbs: basil, parsley, dill, etc.
  • Chipotle
  • Harissa: a Tunisian hot chili pepper paste
  • Dry spices: curry powder, paprika, etc.

Ratatouille

This very versatile dish is perfect for using up the abundant zucchini and tomatoes, at this time of year. Add dried or fresh hot pepper to taste. Eat this dish with fresh bread, over rice or pasta, or all by itself.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large globe eggplant, peeled, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large zucchini, sliced into ¼-inch-thick rounds
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more
  • ¾ cup olive oil, divided
  • 5 sprigs thyme
  • 1 large onion, halved, sliced ½ inch thick
  • 1 red bell pepper, ribs and seeds removed, coarsely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 pints cherry tomatoes divided (or use 2-3 whole tomatoes)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup torn basil leaves

PREPARATION

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Toss eggplant, zucchini, and 2 tsp. salt in a colander. Let sit 30 minutes, then pat dry with paper towels.
  2. Heat ¼ cup oil in a large Dutch oven or other heavy ovenproof pot over medium-high. Add half of eggplant and zucchini and cook, stirring constantly, until vegetables begin to take on color, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl. Repeat with ¼ cup oil and remaining eggplant and zucchini.
  3. Tie thyme sprigs together with kitchen twine. Heat remaining ¼ cup oil in same pot and cook onion, bell pepper, garlic, and thyme, stirring occasionally, until onion is beginning to brown and is softened, 8–10 minutes.
  4. Add half of tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until just beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in zucchini and eggplant, then top with remaining 1 pint tomatoes (do not stir); season with salt and pepper. Transfer pot to oven and roast until all vegetables are softened and tomatoes have begun to burst, 15–20 minutes.
  5. Remove thyme bundle. Transfer to a serving platter and top with basil.

Read More: Bon Appétit

CSA 2011 – Week 12: Sugar Beet Case #3

Many of you know of Frank Morton, owner of Wild Garden Seed. Wild Garden Seed and GTF have been working together since 1994. Not all of you may be aware of the current court case going on between Frank Morton (represented along with others by the Center for Food Safety), the USDA, and the Sugar Beet Industry (Monsanto and other companies that financially benefit from the industry). The Center for Food Safety (CFS) originally filed a suit against the USDA when Frank and other growers of beet seeds realized that some growers in the Willamette Valley switched to GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) sugar beets. The USDA had allowed farmers close by to start growing these GMO sugar beets without any sort of testing. They sued the USDA simply because they did not want the sugar beets to contaminate their beets by cross pollinating.

Frank and the CFS wanted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to be done in order to protect organic growers and farmers from contamination. The Judge ruled in favor of CFS and Morton. However, then the USDA changed the rules and issued special permits to allow the commercial sugar beet growers to continue despite the judge’s ruling. The CFS and those who they represent decided to sue again after they had won, when nothing was going to be enforced. The goal was to make the growers remove what they had illegally planted. In this second case the Judge ruled in favor of Morton and the CFS again. Although, once again the USDA had completed a preliminary environmental assessment and said that the GMO sugar beet growers did not have to pull up the stecklings (roots of transplanted beets) because of safe guards (from cross-contamination) implemented by the USDA. The judges ruling was considered to be moot, or not valid, because of the rules being rewritten once again.

Following the second ruling, Morton and the CFS were getting ready to try again. Before they had time to file again, the sugar beet industry decided to sue CFS and the USDA for making it too hard for their industry. This means that the sugar beet industry got to choose where the case would be heard, and they chose Washington D.C, as opposed to San Francisco, where the previous cases had been heard. The D.C location makes it a bit harder for CFS and Frank, but I think that was their intention.

Contamination of Frank’s seed by the sugar beets would be terrible. The sugar beets could not only cross and contaminate his beets, but also chard seeds since they are all in the Beta vulgaris family. This threat of contamination could scare off customers, and he believes it does. Sugar beet contamination could affect his seed stock and future plantings. The whole thing is a sticky situation as well because of the patents that Monsanto has on the genes in the GMO sugar beets.

Because of these patents, no one but Monsanto can actually do any safety testing on their crops and publicize it. This patent also poses a threat to Frank and other growers like him; what if his crop does get contaminated? Does Monsanto own the rights to those seeds, or just the contaminated ones, or what? It’s not very clear, but one thing is – the USDA is obviously making up rules to keep the sugar beet industry in business while leaving Frank and many other growers like him feeling unprotected and unheard by the government. Hopefully the third time will be a charm!

What’s in the box? 

  • 1.5 lb Potatoes (nicola) – Steam, roast, or mash. These are versatile.
  • Carrots, bunched – They are great raw, on salad, slaw or stir fried.
  • 3 onions(1 walla, 1 superstar, 1 red ) – Chop the onions and eat raw on salads or soups. They are very good caramelized.
  • Honey Orange Melon – Eat just like it is!
  • Charentais melon – Very flavorful French melon. Try salting it slightly before eating.
  • 1 colored pepper – Grill, roast, or just eat raw, they are very sweet.
  • 1 poblano pepper– Grill, roast, or add to a sauté for an extra kick. These can be slightly spicy and have a great flavor.
  • 2 Japanese cucumbers– Chop and add to a salad. Marinate and combine with tomatoes!  Try combining with melons and eat together.
  • 1 lb green beans– Blanch them and then sauté with olive oil, salt, garlic and herbs.
  • Squash (zucchini and cocozelle) – Grate and make fritters, or zucchini bread. Bake or sauté with onions, olive oil and salt.
  • Celery– Snack on raw, or use in soups!
  • Green Leaf lettuce– Make a salad, or add to sandwiches, make lettuce wraps!
  • Tomatoes (approximately 2 lbs)- Chop raw on salad, or sandwiches.
  • Corn– Grill in husk or steam. Add some butter and salt if you’d like.

Stuffed Onions
4 large onions
2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 cups whole grain bread crumbs or brown rice
1/4 cup toasted nuts (almonds work well)
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 cup parmesan cheese, grated
2 teaspoons parsley, finely chopped
1 egg, lightly beaten
Sea salt and pepper

Cut onions in half along the equator and remove the inner part of the onion, leaving a shell two or three layers thick. Make a small slice on the bottom of each onion shell so that it will stand upright. Place shells in a buttered glass oven dish.Chop the onion taken from the centers and sauté in olive oil until tender. Add rice or bread crumbs, nuts, oregano, cheese and parsley and mix well. Remove from heat, stir in the egg and season to taste. Fill the onion shells with the stuffing. Add a little water to the baking pan and bake at 300 degrees for 1 hour.

Stir Fry Green Beans with Cashews
1 pound string beans, each end cut off
1/2 cup crispy cashews, chopped
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
2 Tablespoons soy sauce
1/2 cup filtered water, orange juice or chicken stock
1 tablespoon arrowroot mixed with 1 tablespoon filtered water
1 teaspoon raw honey
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
1 clove garlic
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary

Combine ginger, soy sauce, water or stock, honey, sesame oil, garlic and rosemary. Mix thoroughly with a wire whisk. Heat the oil in a skillet or wok. Stir fry the beans until just tender, about 5 minutes. Add cashews and the sauce mixture and bring to a boil. Add the arrowroot mixture and simmer until the sauce thickens and the beans are well coated.