2016 CSA – Week 20: From the Field to the Fridge

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CSA Newsletter – Week 20


From the Field to the Fridge

I have the pleasure of hosting a pickup each week in Corvallis. It is there that I get to see the fruits of our labor enjoyed by CSA members, their children, and even a few dogs! Last week, I was chatting with a member about how many vegetables are groomed during harvest or during packing on the farm. For some vegetables, there is quite a transformation from the field to your fridge.

Anything with a twist tie has been bunched in the field. That means that several plants, leaves, or stems are gathered together, sometimes from multiple plants or stalks, to make a bunch. Bunches must be uniform and consistent, it is certainly a skill. Bunches are comprised of the best vegetation from a planting, so no matter how the planting looks in the fields, the bunches will always look great!

Root crops such as beets, turnips, or rutabagas are trimmed in the field. The greens are left in the field along with any roots that are clearly not marketable. The resulting harvest is brought into the barn for washing and further grading.

In the barn, cabbages are peeled down to layers without holes or blemishes. Onions are peeled to check for quality. Leeks and scallions tops are trimmed or chopped.

All of this selection allows us to bring you the best of what we have to offer. Enjoy!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Crown Prince Squash ($6.50) – This beautiful blue squash is a great keeper and has dense, sweet orange flesh. Roast it and use it for pie, soup, or eat it as is.

☐  1 Black Radish ($1.00) – This striking radish is very versatile. It is a bit denser than a salad radish but can certainly be eaten fresh when sliced thin. Try adding it to gratins or roasting it, see recipe.

☐  1 Watermelon Radish ($1.00) – These radishes are a welcomed burst of color in the fall. Slice into the green and white radish to reveal a vibrant pink interior. Add some color to any salad, soup, or veggie roast.

  1 Cabbage ($6.25) – This cabbage will keep for several weeks (or longer) in your fridge and can become an ingredient in many meals. Try it stir-fried, in soups, salads, or stuffed.

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Swiss Chard ($3.00)

  1 Red Onion ($0.75)

☐  2 Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. They are delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $30.00

 

Recipes

Pumpkin Pie

 For the Crust

  • 3 cups raw pecans
  • 6 tbsp. light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 12 tsp. kosher salt
  • 6 tbsp. butter, cubed

For the Filling

  • 1 ¾ Cup roasted squash
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup 2% milk

Preheat oven to 350° with rack in the middle position. Pulse pecans, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in food processor until coarsely chopped. Add butter and pulse until mixture is finely ground and holds together like damp sand. Press most of the pecan mixture into deep dish 9″ pie plate, Bake 8–10 minutes until lightly colored and fragrant. Set aside until ready to fill.

In large bowl, combine the squash, eggs, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves; beat until smooth. (I like to use a food processor)  Gradually beat in milk. Pour into crust.

Bake at 350° for  50-60 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cover edges with foil during the last 30 minutes to prevent over-browning if necessary. Cool on a wire rack. Refrigerate leftovers.

Read More: Saveur for crust and TasteofHome for filling.

 

Roasted Radishes

Radishes are delicious raw in salads but they are also delicious cooked or roasted. Cooking tones down the spiciness so if you aren’t’ a fan of raw radishes, try them cooked!

Ingredients

  • 3 large watermelon radishes, peeled
  • 1 Black radish, peeled
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

Chèvre Horseradish Dressing

  • Fresh horseradish
  • Zest from 1/2 of a lemon
  • 1 ½ tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ cup chèvre
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400º.  Cover a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil, coat lightly with oil.

Cut radishes into 1/2-inch thick, even pieces. Toss radish pieces with olive oil, salt, and pepper in a large bowl to coat evenly. Distribute the radish pieces in an even layer on the baking sheet.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring after 15 minutes. Radishes should have some browning, and retain some firmness when they are done.

While radishes are roasting, grate about 2 to 3 packed tablespoons’ worth of fresh horseradish. Thoroughly combine 1 ½  tbsp of the grated horseradish with the lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, chèvre, and 1/8 tsp salt.

Once radishes have finished roasting, transfer them to the bowl with the dressing. Toss to coat. Taste and add salt if needed. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Read More: Food52

 

Kimchi-Style Sautéed Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 2 scallions, cut into ½” pieces, plus more, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 1” piece peeled ginger, chopped
  • 2 tbsp gochujang
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ½ head green cabbage, cut into 1” strips
  • Kosher salt

Preparation

Purée scallions, garlic, ginger, gochujang, fish sauce, and rice vinegar in a blender. Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Cook cabbage, tossing often, until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add scallion mixture and sliced scallions; season with salt.

Read More: BonAppetit

 

October 8th Market Recipes ft. Hakurei Turnips

This Saturday was one of my favorite markets of the season. It was a perfect autumnal Oregon day, complete with a misty morning and a beautiful sunny afternoon. Tis the season of cool days and warm sautés. This week I’m throwing in some photos of our market booth at the end of the recipes, everything was just too beautiful not to share. Happy cooking everyone! img_2948-2

  • Kohlrabi, raw (June 4th post)
  • Watermelon Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Black Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Hakurei Turnip: Raw & Tamari Stir Fry
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéed

RECIPES:

  • Hakurei Turnip Tamari Stir Fry
    • For those of you who had the luxury of tasting these sweet treats in the spring, the rumors are true, Hakurei turnips are back in season. Raw, these turnips are soft and sweet and pure with fall magic. They can be eaten like an apple, added to a salad, or my favorite- used as a vehicle for dip. If you can stop munching them raw for a moment and use them in a stir fry, they are extremely satiating. There is no reason to not utilize the entire plant in the stir fry- the roots, stems, and leaves are all delicious and add to the meal.img_2947-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 2 bunches Hakurei Turnips
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head Garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive Oil
      • Tamari
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic and set both aside.
      • Remove the tails and tops from the Hakurei turnips, cut them in half, and then slice them thin.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in 3-5 Tbsp of tamari and let cook another minute, allowing the tamari to reduce ever so slightly.
      • Add in your Hakurei turnips and the garlic at this point. Adding garlic later in the cooking process preserves its flavor, which you definitely want when you’ve spent the time to peel and mince. Let cook about 3 minutes.
      • Roughly chop the turnip greens and stems and add them into the sauté. Add another splash of tamari  and a pinch or two of salt and let cook 1-2 minutes.
      • Turn off the pan and add more salt and tamari to taste if needed. Serve as is or over rice.
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
    • This amazing dish can only be enjoyed in a small window of time when we still have summer peppers hanging on despite winter squash encroaching on our market shelves. It was a favorite last year at market and continues to be one of mine, as the smoky poblano flavor compliments the creamy sweet delicata so well.
    • INGREDIENTS:img_2958-2
      • 1 Delicata squash, sliced into half-moons
      • 3-4 Poblano peppers, sliced thinly
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Cut the ends off your delicata squash to make a flat surface, then stand it on end and slice it in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to remove the seeds. Make thin half-moon slices down the delicata. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the sliced delicata and let cook covered about 4-6 minutes.
      • Chop the poblanos in half and rip out the seeds and stem (make sure to wash your hands after touching the spicy seeds). Chop each half into thin slices.
      • Add the poblanos, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
      • Let cook a couple more minutes to desired softness. Add more salt to taste, and enjoy! Customers last year said this dish was a hit at Thanksgiving.
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéedimg_2954-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 1 head Broccoli, broken into pieces
      • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
      • 2-3 Carrots, sliced into discs
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the broccoli and romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
      • Slice up a few carrots just to add some color to the green sauté. Add them into pan along with garlic and 1-2 pinches salt. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the broccoli and romanesco are cooked but still have some crunch.
      • Enjoy!

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Potato Varieties from left to right: Mountain Rose, Nicola, Rose Apple Finn Red Fingerlings, Purple Majesty, French Yellow Fingerlings

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2016 CSA – Week 17: Celeriac

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CSA Newsletter – Week 17


Celeriac: a very delicious, underrated vegetable

The bizarre-looking ball of root in your box this week is actually one of the most delicious flavors of fall. Don’t be deterred by its gnarly, knobby exterior, this fall crop is incredibly delicious when roasted, braised, made into soup, or even raw. If you can get past the unusual exterior and its somewhat cumbersome shape, I promise that celeriac won’t disappoint.

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Celeriac

Celeriac is a bit of a an exotic vegetable in that it is very slow growing and takes most of the growing season to mature. While plantings of such things as lettuce, cilantro, and spinach come and go, celeriac is seeded in late March and is in the ground from June to October. It is somewhat challenging to harvest because of its gnarly root system and it is a bit of a bear to wash because of all those crevices that the roots create.

If you want to sample this truly special vegetable, make it into soup with such things as leeks, apples, and potatoes or a gratin with potatoes. However, my favorite way to prepare celeriac is a bit more indulgent: celeriac fries with homemade mayonnaise. I find that the best way to appreciate its subtle flavor and creamy texture is to eat it on its own. No matter how you prepare celeriac, I hope that eating it is a pleasure!

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Kohlrabi

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  Celeriac ($3.00) – Peal or cut off the outer skin of the celeriac and add to soups, mashed potatoes, or make fries. See recipe.

☐  1 Jester Squash ($2.25) – This squash is a cross between a delicata and an acorn squash. The flesh is most and sweet when cooked and the seeds are delicious roasted as well.

☐  1 Gil’s Golden Pippin Squash ($1.00) – This little acorn squash is delicious and sweet. The skin is thin enough to eat if you like and it is delicious roasted or sautéed.

  Savoy Cabbage ($2.75) – This beautiful cabbage can be used in any cabbage recipe and the leaves are particularly good for stuffing.

☐  2 Colored Peppers ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Golden Beets ($3.50) – Eat the beats and the greens too! Golden beets are delicious on their own or incorporated into a salad.  

☐  1 Bunch Arugula ($3.00) – Arugula is such a versatile green. It is delicious in salads, with eggs, on sandwiches, or even as pesto. See Recipe.

  2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.50)

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25) – Kohlrabi is delicious raw and cooked. Peal the outer skin and eat the crunchy, mild inside in salad, dips, or roasted. See Recipe.

☐  Cilantro ($2.00)

☐  1 Tomato ($2.00)

Box Market Value: $27.75

 

Recipes

Garlic & Herb Celeriac Fries

Use any herb combination you like or even just a little salt. For a delicious dip make some aioli or mix pesto with mayonnaise. For a simpler version, skip the boiling step and stick the celeriac fries strait in the oven.

Ingredients

  • 1 celeriac
  • 2 tbsp oil (olive oil or coconut oil works best)
  • 2 tsp oregano
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • salt and pepper
  • 4 stalks of rosemary

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 F.
  2. Peel and cut the celeriac in wedges or fries. Fill a pan with cold water and add the celeriac. Bring to the boil, drain the fries and allow them to steam dry. Add the oregano, garlic, salt and pepper and mix well.
  3. Heat the oil on a baking tray in the oven. When the oil is hot, remove from the oven and add the fries to the tray. Top with the rosemary stalks and return the tray to the oven for 35-40 minutes.

Read More: MyFussyEater

 

Kohlrabi

This may be another unfamiliar vegetable in your box this week. Kohlrabi is in the brassica family along with kale, broccoli, and cabbage. It is delicious raw in salads or slaws, sliced and eaten with hummus or other dips, or roasted. The possibilities are endless!

Roasted Kohlrabi with Parmesan

Ingredients

  • 6 kohlrabi
  • 2 table spoons olive oil
  • ¾ tsp kosher salt
  • a pinch of cayenne (optional)
  • 3 Tbsp. parmesan cheese
  • 1 Tbsp. parsley

Preparation

Peel kohlrabi and cut into 1-inch wedges; toss with olive oil, kosher salt and a pinch of cayenne on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast at 450 F, stirring every 10 minutes, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes. Toss with parmesan and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley.

Read More: FoodNetwork

For more information about Kohlrabi and for a list of kohlrabi recipes, visit SimplyRecipes.

 

Arugula Pesto

Pesto is a great way to preserve the flavors of herbs or greens for later use. Pest is delicious on pasta but also on roasted veggies or mixed with mayonnaise aioli for a delicious dip or dressing.

 Ingredients

  • 2 cups of packed arugula leaves, stems removed
  • 1/2 cup of shelled walnuts
  • 1/2 cup fresh Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, unpeeled
  • 1/2 garlic clove peeled and minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preparation

  1. Brown the garlic: Brown 6 garlic cloves with their peels on in a skillet over medium high heat until the garlic is lightly browned in places, about 10 minutes. Remove the garlic from the pan, cool, and remove the skins.
  2. Toast the nuts: Toast the nuts in a pan over medium heat until lightly brown, or heat in a microwave on high heat for a minute or two until you get that roasted flavor. In our microwave it takes 2 minutes.
  3. Process in food processor: (the fast way) Combine the arugula, salt, walnuts, roasted and raw garlic into a food processor. Pulse while drizzling the olive oil into the processor. Remove the mixture from the processor and put it into a bowl. Stir in the Parmesan cheese.

Adjust to taste: Because the pesto is so dependent on the individual ingredients, and the strength of the ingredients depends on the season or variety, test it and add more of the ingredients to taste.

Read More: SimplyRecipes

Dinner Menu for June 30-July 2, 2016

Antipasti

bread-olives   4.5

-duck rillette   5.5

-duck liver mousse  5.5

-pork pâté  5.5  all three 9.5

gtf farmhouse LIVERWURST  4.5

gtf chicken hearts/zucchini  5.5

bruschetta/tomato/basil   6.5

caesar salad/artisan bread/   7.5

gtf salad-beets/cuke/blue cheese  7.5

gazpacho  soup  5

ducky onion  soup  5

Pizze Rosse

garlic/basil/tomato/mozzarella    9.5

duck/kale/mozz  10.5

mushrooms/goat cheese/mozz  10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

tomato/blue/thyme/mozz  10.5

bacon/scallion/egg/mozz 10.5

ham/zukes/olives/mozz   10.5

 

-add an egg, anchovies, pickled jalapeno

for  2.

 

Secondi          (three course meal $29)

GTF chicken breast/brown rice/mushroom/kale /roasted peppers  17.5

duck breast/carrot/spinach/berries  18.5

pork chop/polenta/summer squash/chard/caramelized new onions  19.5

hanger  steak/potato/baby carrots/greens/ basil aioli* 19.5

albacore tuna/lentils/tomato/radicchio/pesto  20.5

crêpes /tomato/baby  onion/kohlrabi/pesto   16.5

 

To Finish

“tiramisu” cake/coffee/chocolate/angelfood/ anglaise   6.5

marionberry and vanilla cream filled crepes/chantilly  6.5

strawberry ice cream baked Alaska/almond  6.5

vol au vent/orange curd/marionberries and chantilly  6.5

June 25th Market Recipes – Spinach Basil Salad and Fresh Pico de Gallo

Summer is officially here, and with it has come another slew of seasonal produce. It’s now that time of year when a few quick chops is all that stands between you and a meal of simple fresh food. The following recipes focus on quick raw dishes that can be enjoyed without turning on the stove, although I did break down and cook up some zucchini, I just missed it so much all winter.

  • Fresh Cucumber with Lemon and Salt20160622_090504 (2) 700 pixels wide
  • Fresh Kohlrabi with Lemon and Salt (June 4th post)
  • Cocozelle Squash Sauté with Black Kale and Garlic
  • Spinach Basil Salad
  • Pico de Gallo

FRESH CUCUMBER WITH LEMON AND SALT:

Cucumber season is in full swing! Eat them whole like an apple, slice them up with lemon and salt, mince them into a salad- cucumbers are good for everything.

COCOZELLE SQUASH SAUTE WITH BLACK KALE AND GARLIC:20160625_104941 (2)

Summer squash and garlic are soul mates, and when they are together, deliciousness is sure to result. Many people asked me, “One head of garlic? You must mean 1 clove?” No sir, no ma’am, I mean one head! Though garlic is most commonly treated as a seasoning, I prefer to treat it as a vegetable as it provides a savory flavor that makes vegetarian dishes feel especially filling. Feel free to add as much as or as little as you wish! I used Cocozelle in this dish, a type of zucchini that has thicker skin which helps the squash maintain its form without getting mushy in the pan.

  • 3 Cocozelle Summer Squash, sliced into discs
  • 1/2 Willamette Sweet Onion, finely chopped
  • 1 head Garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch Lacinato Black Kale, roughly chopped
  • Olive oil
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Coat the bottom of the pan in olive oil and bring it up to medium-high heat.
  2. Once up to temperature, add in the chopped onion and cook for 2 minutes.
  3. Add in sliced squash and garlic, stirring around to coat everything in oil. Sauté for about 7 minutes.
  4. Stir in the black kale and add a couple pinches of salt. Sauté for about 3 minutes. Timing is somewhat key here, as we don’t want the squash to get mushy. Make sure to add in the kale while the squash is still a little bit raw so that both the kale and the squash finish cooking about the same time in the pan.
  5. My favorite way to eat this dish is for breakfast topped with two fried eggs and some hot sauce. However it is also delicious along side rice and chicken, or just by itself.

SPINACH BASIL SALAD:20160625_104933 (2)

Spinach is not the biggest fan of hot weather, so I made this dish in an effort to enjoy it in its prime before we all have to go a month or two without its tender greens in our lives.

  • 1 bunch Spinach, roughly chopped
  • 2/3 bunch Basil, finely chopped
  • ~6 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • ~4 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/4 Willamette Sweet Onion, minced
  • Salt to taste, 2-3 pinches

Directions:

  1. Mince the garlic and onion and place them in a medium bowl.
  2. Pour the olive oil, salt, and balsamic vinegar into the bowl, and mash the onion and garlic into the dressing a bit with the back of a spoon. This is the magic secret! All those onion and garlic juices will release into your dressing making it incredibly flavorful.
  3. Chop up the spinach and basil and toss them in the dressing.
  4. This salad is delicious as is, although if you let it sit 10-15 minutes before serving, the vinegar will break down the spinach a bit making for an extremely tender salad.

PICO DE GALLO:20160625_115024 (2)

Pico de Gallo is one of my main dinners during the summer. All you have to do is roughly chop up the following ingredients, dump them all in a bowl, and mix them around. Serve with tortilla chips, on top of tacos, or if you’re crazy like me, grab a spoon and experience just how fresh summer can taste. You’ll notice from this picture that I like my pico with heavy quantities of onion; for those of you who prefer less onion, feel free to add less.

  • 4 medium Tomatoes
  • 1 medium-large Willamette Sweet Onion
  • 2-3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro
  • 1/3 bunch Basil
  • Lemon Juice to taste
  • Salt to taste