Lunch Menu: Week of September 27, 2016

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Grilled quail with braised red cabbage & duck fat fried potatoes

Antipasti

Chad Fell bread & olive oil  4.5

Chad Fell bread & olives  5.5

mixed field greens/balsamic vinaigrette  6.5

melon/kalamata/fennel salad 7.5

GTF salad – beets/ blue cheese/
poppyseed dressing 9.5

corn and curry soup  4

ceci and tomato soup   4

 

 

 

Pizze Rosse

garlic/basil/fresh tom/mozz  9.5

bacon/broccoli /blue/mozz  10.5

zuke/arugula/anchovy /mozz  10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

sausage/corn/mozz   10.5

egg/kale/onion/mozz   10.5

tomato/thyme/leeks/mozz  10.5

 

–add egg, anchovies or

pickled jalepenos for  $1

 

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Seafood brodetto of salmon & albacore with potato, tomato & aioli

Secondi

chicken ravioli with beet greens, broccoli & mushrooms   11

semolina gnocchi with roasted tomatoes, corn & mozzarella  10

grilled quail with braised red cabbage & duck fat fried potatoes  11

creamy polenta with poached farm egg*, black kale, roasted peppers & balsamic reduction  10

seafood brodetto of salmon & albacore with potato, tomato & aioli  12

September 24th Market Recipes ft. Poblanos with Purple Potatoes

It’s that wonderful time of year when autumn has just20160903_074715-2 begun, and our market stands are filled with both summer and fall foods. Yesterday at the Corvallis Farmers market our sample table was a perfect example of this, with a rainbow of fresh watermelon samples next to hearty fall sautes.

For those of you lovelies who have been reading these market recipe posts regularly, I apologize for posting sporadically during peak season. Now that things are beginning to slow down at the farm I finally have time to post again. Thank you for your support! Here’s everything we sampled up downtown yesterday.

  • Watermelon: orange, yellow, and sorbet20160924_112541-2
    • The season is coming to and end, we’ll have to eat as much melon as we can before they’re gone!
  • Specialty Melons: Charentais cantaloupe, Honey orange
  • Hot Chioggia Beet Salad (July 9th post)

NEW RECIPES

Poblanos with Purple Potatoes

  • Ingredients:
    • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
    • 6 medium purple potatoes: slice each potato in half, then slice in half again before making thin slices down the length of the potatoimg_2596-2
    • 6 poblano peppers, roughly chopped
    • 1 head garlic, chopped finely (We don’t currently have garlic, but Goodfoot farm has an excellent crop this year!)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • Directions:
    • I like to chop everything in this dish before I even turn on the pan, because the timing needs to be right so that the potatoes and peppers finish at the same time. I often have trouble burning potatoes when cooking them with other vegetables, but I’ve found a little trick that takes away most of that risk. After you chop your potatoes thinly, spread them out on the cutting board and place a cloth or paper towel over them. Press down on the potatoes to remove as much water from them as you can. It makes a big difference! (And it works perfectly for hash browns.)
    • Note that the poblano seeds are often very spicy, so you’ll want to wash your hands well after removing them. A small amount of heat is retained in the peppers themselves, but for the most part it just offers an incredibly full flavor.img_2628-2
    • Coat the bottom of the pan in olive oil and heat it up to medium high temperature; if a piece of shallot sizzles in the oil it’s up to temp.
    • Add in the shallots, stir them around, and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the poblanos next, as they will take longer to cook than the thinly sliced potatoes. Cover and let cook 7-10 minutes.
    • The peppers should be about halfway done at this point; add in the potatoes and the garlic and let cook with the lid on another 5 minutes.
    • Remove the lid and add in 3-4 pinches of salt; stir. Let cook another 2-5 minutes with the lid off until the veggies are done to your satisfaction. I usually take out a sample to taste before deciding when a dish is done.
    • Optional Deliciousness:
      • This dish is my staple breakfast! I always add cheese, fried eggs, and hot sauce to tie everything together, and I highly recommend it. I even freeze bags of raw poblano slices so that I can make this all winter long.

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Fried Shishito Peppers

  • Shishito peppers look similar to a padrone, another small, green, thin-walled pepper, though they aren’t spicy 99% of the time (you never do know with peppers). Because they are so small, you don’t need to bother slicing them up. Cooking them whole retains moisture, saves time, and it’s fun to just pick one off the plate and eat the pepper straight off the stem.img_2638-2
  • Ingredients:
    • 2 pints shishitos
    • Oil, preferably high heat (not olive oil)
    • Salt
  • Directions:
    • Heat the oil up in the pan to medium high and dump the shishitos into the pan whole. Cover with a grease screen to avoid splattering.
    • Let the peppers fry in the oil 5-10 minutes, stirring them around occasionally.
    • Salt the peppers with 2-3 big pinches and let fry another 2-5 minutes.
    • Serve as a snack or side dish. I forgot to take pictures of samples at market yesterday so I recreated everything at home this morning. We ate the shishitos along with our poblano potatoes and they were delicious!

CSA 2011 – Week 14: Hybrid vs. Open Pollinated vs. Heirloom seeds

Many of you have been receiving some of our specialty ‘heirloom’ tomatoes each week. They seem to come in all sorts of crazy shapes and colors. Along with these some of you also get some of our big beef tomatoes as well. The big beefs are fairly uniform in color and shape and the plants have a high yield. What is the main difference between these two types of tomatoes? The seeds. The heirloom tomato seeds are old varieties from which the seeds have been saved. On the other hand, big beef tomato seeds are a hybrid variety of seed. This means that the seed was produced by the mating of two “parents” in the same species.

So, one would purposefully cross a high-producing tomato plant with one that is disease resistant in order to create a tomato that would be both high producing and disease resistant. Nowadays, from a legal standpoint, the pollination of hybrid must be controlled and the parents must be known. Hybrid crops seem great from one angle: more tomatoes, disease resistance – what could be better? However, one fallback is that the seeds saved from hybrids do not stay true to their type. So, if you tried to save seeds from a big beef tomato, the seeds may not germinate, and if they do, they may not produce fruit. If they do produce, they may not be ‘big beefs’. On top of that, hybrid seeds are generally more expensive than open pollinated or heirloom seeds.

Now, a little bit about open pollinated seeds. ‘Heirloom seeds’ is just a name for old varieties of open pollinated seeds. Open pollinated seeds are ones that are true to their type in the way that you can save their seeds, replant them and they will produce the same plant that you saved the seeds from. Some species of plants are self pollinating (beans, peas, tomatoes, and lettuce), so these do not have to be isolated by types in order to keep from crossing. On the other hand, species such as beets, brassicas, carrots, corn, and squash are cross-pollinating species, and they need to be isolated in order to keep the resulting seeds true to their parent plant.

We grow a combination of hybrid and open pollinated vegetables here at GTF. I think that there is something very valuable about being able to save seed from your own crops. But at the same time there is something very valuable about a plant that will readily produce and be vigorous. I guess you can find both qualities in some hybrid and open pollinated varieties of vegetables. I think that it’s safe to say that both seem to have their place in the vegetable farming world today.

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (Rose Gold)- Steam, roast, fry, mash, you can do just about anything!

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

2 onions (1 white, 1 yellow)– Add to any sauté, or eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad.

Charantais melon– Eat just like it is!

Lemongrass– Use it as a seasoning in curry or Thai dishes, try steeped in soup too! Make lemongrass tea!

2 colored peppers—Grill, roast, or just eat raw, they are sweet.

1 cippolini onion– Caramelize, or eat raw. They are sweet when cooked.

1 Broccoli or cauliflower– Steam, eat raw, or blanch and then sauté in butter or olive oil. It’s tasty roasted as well.

1 green cabbage– make slaw, steam in chunks or add to soup or stew.

Cardinal or Red oak compact lettuce– Make a salad, or add to sandwiches, make lettuce wraps.

Tomatoes (approximately 2 lbs) – Chop raw on salad, or sandwiches.

1 pint of cherry tomatoes– eat on salads, cut in half and make a tomato salad with basil.

4 ears of corn– Grill in husk or steam; add salt and butter or just eat plain.

Vegetable curry
2-3 cups of chopped cabbage
3-4 carrots, sliced into 1/8 inch rounds
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves of garlic, chopped
1/2 head of broccoli or cauliflower
1 small tomato
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 can coconut milk
1/4 cup chopped lemongrass, chopped
4 tablespoons red or green curry paste
1-2 cups of water or stock (vegetable or chicken work well)
Salt to taste

Heat the olive oil in a large pan or wok on medium. Add the onions, carrots and cabbage. Sautée for 10 minutes or so, or until the carrots are about half cooked. Add the broccoli and garlic and continue cooking for another couple of minutes.

Add the stock, coconut milk, curry paste, chopped tomato, and lemon grass. Bring to a boil and then turn down to a simmer. Salt to taste. You may add more or less curry paste depending on how spicy you would like it to be.
*The lemongrass can be put in some sort of a cheesecloth baggie and steeped or put directly into the curry. It will stay woody even when cooked so I usually don’t eat the lemongrass, but infuse the flavor into the dish.
*Add some sort of cooked meat to this if you’d like! Cilantro or Thai basil goes well in this dish too.

Roasted pepper ‘pesto’
2 colored peppers
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup parmesan cheese, shredded
1/4 cup toasted nuts, almonds or filberts (optional)
Pinch of salt

Roast the peppers in a 400 degree oven for about 40 minutes, or until skins start to brown. Place in a metal or glass bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let sit until somewhat cooled. Peel skins off of the peppers and remove the stem and seeds. Place the peppers aside.
Meanwhile in a blender or food processor, place the oil and garlic, Pulse until the garlic is no longer visible. Add the peppers and pulse a few times longer. Add the cheese and nuts, pulse a few more times and then salt to taste. This spread goes wonderfully on sandwiches, as a topping for many veggie dishes, or even as a dip for carrots or broccoli.