Tetsukabuto Squash

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We’d like to introduce you to the Tetsukabuto Squash, commonly called a Japanese pumpkin. Although we are now out of butternut, we have PLENTY of Tetsukabuto to go around. The nearly round, dark green fruit has a deep yellow flesh that is so sweet and nutty and smooth and creamy, it’s like custard. It is well-suited for any pumpkin or winter squash recipe, but is especially delicious simply baked and served by itself.

Get your own Tetsukabuto at any of the farmers’ markets we attend, or call us to make a special order.

Lunch Menu: Week of November 8, 2016

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Creamy polenta with poached egg, corn, peppers, delicata squash

Antipasti

Chad Fell bread & olive oil  4.5

mixed field greens/balsamic vinaigrette  6.5

mortadella plate 6.5

goat cheese tart/ butternut and greens 7.5

ricotta zeppole/ honey mustard sauce 7.5

GTF Salad: delicata/apple/roasted garlic 9.5

curried  squash soup  4

brown rice and kale soup   4

 

 

Pizze Rosse

garlic/oregano/mozz  9.5

delicata/ham/blue/mozz 10.5

basil pesto/cauliflower/mozz 10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

egg/potato/bacon/mozz   10.5

feta/kale/sunchokes/mozz10.5

mushrooms/romanesco/mozz  10.5

 

–add egg or pickled jalapenos for  $1

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Ricotta zeppole with honey mustard sauce

Secondi

kabocha ravioli/carrots/cauliflower/basil/almonds  10

ragú of pork shoulder/collard greens/tagliatelle/parmesan  10

creamy polenta/poached egg*/corn/peppers/delicata squash   9.5

seafood brodetto/potato/rockfish/black kale/tomato/*aioli   12

pork loin/potatoes/roasted caulilflower/leeks/apple mostarda   11

2016 CSA – Week 18: After the Harvest

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CSA Newsletter – Week 18


After the Harvest

I said my goodbyes to a house of heirloom tomatoes as I helped clear it out for the next planting. It is another reminder of the changing seasons and another reminder that a farmer’s work is never done!

When we harvest many of our crops, such as beets, turnips, potatoes, more often than not, the whole plant is harvested and the field is pretty much cleared and ready to be turned over to the next crop in the rotation. Sometimes, we add an amendment or two and then we turn over the soil and prep it to receive the next planting.

However, some crops require more work before the ground is ready for the next planting. Crops such as tomatoes, eggplant, and cucumbers that are harvested continuously often require trellising infrastructure. Once the crop is done producing, the plant matter, up to 10 ft. tall, must be uprooted and hauled away. This can be a messy job as there are inevitably some rotting vegetables in the houses as well. The trellising setup must be dis-assembled and any drip irrigation must be removed. Only then can the soil be prepared for the next planting.

It’s a lot of work but I think that we can agree that the delicious results are worth the extra effort!

 

Table of Box Contents

☐  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Huckleberry Gold Potatoes ($3.00) – Beautiful purple potatoes with yellow flesh that is creamy and buttery. Great as mashed potatoes, roasted, or baked.

☐  Scarlet Kabocha Squash ($4.50)

☐  1 lb Sunchokes ($4.00) – These knobby tubers caramelize beautifully when roasted. See recipe.

☐  Bok Choy ($3.00) – This beautiful, Asian vegetable is delicious in stir-fries and soups.

☐  2 Colored Peppers ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Colored Carrots ($3.50)- This bunch of carrots not only beautiful but they are just as delicious as they look!

   Romanesco ($6.25) – This fractal vegetable is beautiful and delicious! It is in the brassica family and is related to broccoli and cauliflower. Blanch it in boiling water and then shock it under cold water or in an ice bath. Us it in stir-fries, salads, or grill it!

☐  1 Dried Sweet Onion ($0.75)- Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. It is delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

  1 Dried Red Onion ($0.75)

☐  3 Roma Tomatoes ($3.00) – These tomatoes are great for sauce, soups, or roasting. They have firm flesh and are less juicy which lends itself to cooking but they are also delicious in salsa. If you want to save them for soups or sauces for winter, you can freeze the tomatoes whole.

 Box Market Value: $32.00

 

Recipes

Creamy Kabocha Squash Polenta

 I tend to roast squash and eat with a little butter and salt, but if you wanted to incorporate it in a dish, polenta is a perfect base.

 Ingredients

  • 1 Kabocha Squash
  • ½ cup cream
  • 2 cups polenta
  • 2 oz parmesan, grated
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  1. Remove stem from squash. Halve, scoop seeds, and bake face down in 1/2″ water at 400 F until tender, 20-30 minutes. Allow to sit for about 10 minutes. Scoop flesh into bowl with an immersion blender or blender. Add the cream and blend to get a thick and very smooth purée. Season with salt.
  2. Bring 3 cups water to a boil with 1 t salt. Stir in polenta and stir until your arm wants to fall off – about 30 minutes. Try to stir as much as possible as it makes it creamier. At around the 20-minute mark, stir in the kabocha and cheese. Season with nutmeg and white pepper and salt to taste.

Read More: Food52

 

Roasted Sunchokes

This knobby tuber caramelizes wonderfully when roasted.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Sunchokes, scrubbed
  • ½ tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chopped Italian or curled parsley (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees
  2. Scrub the Sunchokes with a potato brush and chop into 1 inch bite-size chunks
  3. Toss in a medium sized bowl with olive oil, salt and pepper until coated
  4. Place onto a baking sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes, turning once, until the skin is slightly browned
  5. Sprinkle with fresh parsley. Serve plain or with a side of ketchup.

Read More: OliveandHerb

 

Sautéed Romanesco with Garlic

Any fresh vegetable sautéed is bound to be delicious. I find that with most things, getting them a little color or even char greatly enhances their flavor and texture. In addition to sautéed garlic, try incorporating caramelized onions or shallots into this recipe.

Ingredients

  •  1 head of Broccoli Romanesco, cut into bite size pieces
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 1 good pinch of salt
  • 2 cloves of garlic, pressed and mixed with 1 tbs water
  • Parmesan or Romano cheese to taste

  Directions

  1. Bring some well-salted water to a boil.
  2. Cook the Romanesco pieces until just tender, about 3 or 4 minutes
  3. Drain the broccoli pieces and run under cold water until they are cool.
  4. Heat the oil in a pan until it is a hot and begins to shimmer
  5. Add the garlic and for 30 seconds. It should start to smell good and garlicky.
  6. Now add the Romanesco and a pinch of salt and sauté for 2-3 minutes.
  7. Grate cheese over warm Romanesco and enjoy!

 

2016 CSA – Week 10: Onion Harvest…Waiting for the Flop

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CSA Newsletter – Week 10


Onion Harvest: Waiting for the Flop

In early spring, we seeded about 800 flats of onions and shallots in the greenhouse (that’s over 19,000 onions!). These guys have spent the summer growing in the fields and now the tops are beginning to flop. This is an indication that they are done growing. Once the majority of the onions have flopped, they are pulled, by hand, from the ground and laid on the soil surface for a few days. This allows the roots to dry, decreasing the chance of rot
during storage.

The onions are then loaded onto trucks and transported from the field into greenhouses for curing. Curing allows the onion to dry and for a protective skin to form. We typically let them cure for at least one week, sometimes longer if we are busy harvesting other crops! Once the onions have
dried, the tops and roots are trimmed and they are placed in wooden crates for storage. If the crop is healthy and the storage conditions are right, these onions will last through the beginning of next year. You can never have too many onions in my book!

Have a great week.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

☐ Lettuce ($2.00)
☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)
☐ 1 Eggplant ($4.50) – See the recipes for a delicious eggplant sauce.
☐ 2 Colored Bell Peppers ($4.00) – Grill or broil and use in soups, sandwiches,
dips, or salad.
☐ 1 Red Cipollini onion ($1.00) – Cipollinis are lovely roasted or caramelized and can be used in any recipe calling for onion.
☐ 1 White Cipollini onion ($1.00)
☐ 2 Dried Sweet onions ($1.25) – Store in a cool, dry place.
☐ 1 Fennel Bulb ($2.00) – For fennel lovers, use the fronds as the greens in
your favorite pesto recipe.
☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)
☐ 2-3 Zucchini ($2.50)
☐ 1 lb Romano Beans ($4.00) – Substitute these beans for green beans in any
recipe. Delicious blanched or sautéed.
☐ 3 lbs Heirloom Tomatoes (3) ($12.00) – You can’t go wrong with these beautiful tomatoes. Sandwiches, caprese salad, pasta, or slice, salt, and eat with a knife and fork!
☐ 4 Ears of Corn ($4.00) – Picked by farmer John himself. Steam or grill
(with husk on) and eat with salt and butter. For a culinary adventure, make fresh polenta!

Box Market Value: $44.00

 

Recipes

Ottolenghi’s Eggplant Sauce

This recipe is adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s book Plenty. The full recipe includes making a fresh corn polenta which is topped with this sauce. However, the sauce sounded so good it seems that it would be delicious on just about anything! Check out the full recipe at Food 52.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 medium eggplant, cut into 3/4-inch dice
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • 1/4cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup chopped peeled tomatoes (fresh or canned)
  • 6 1/2tablespoons water
  • 1/4teaspoon salt
  • 1/4teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped oregano

Preparation

  1. Heat up the oil in a large saucepan and fry the eggplant on medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until nicely brown.
  2. Drain off as much oil as you can and discard it — the safest way to do this is to scoop out the eggplant to a plate using a slotted spoon, then pour off the oil into a bowl before added the eggplant back in. You can save the oil to fry lamb chops or eggs in tomorrow.
  3. Add the tomato paste to the pan and stir with the eggplant.
  4. Cook for 2 minutes, then add the wine and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add the chopped tomatoes, water, salt, sugar and oregano and cook for a further 5 minutes to get a deep-flavored sauce.
  6. Set aside; warm it up when needed.


Jalapeno Corn Fritters

This is not the type of thing that I would make regularly, but a good fritter sure is delicious! For a slightly lighter version, omit the bacon and cheese.

 Ingredients

  • 3 c. fresh corn
  • 2/3 c. cornmeal
  • 1/4 c. shredded Cheddar
  • 1/4 c. cream cheese
  • 2 scallions, sliced
  • 2 slices cooked bacon, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 jalapeño, finely diced
  • kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil or canola oil
  • Juice of 1 lime, divided
  • Sour cream, for serving

Preparation

  1. In a medium bowl, combine corn, cornmeal, cheddar, cream cheese, scallions, bacon, eggs, the juice of half a lime, and jalapeño.
  2. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper to taste. Using your hands, form the mixture into small patties.
  3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  4. Working in batches, fry the patties until they’re golden brown, about 3 to 4 minutes per sidee.

Read More: Delish