Dinner Menu: September 6-8, 2018

*All items and prices subject to change

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and balsamic vinaigrette 7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, chevre, hazelnuts, and balsamic vinaigrette 10-

Sourdough bread and summer vegetable confit 7-

Plate of pickled farm vegetables 6-

Corn, chevre, and chorizo stuffed pepper roasted in the wood oven with poblano salsa verde  7-

Pork and beef meatballs with tomato sauce, roasted peppers, breadcrumbs and pecorino 10-

Charentais melon, watermelon, and cucumber salad with apricot vinegar, olive oil, and feta  9-

Heirloom tomatoes, Alsea Acres feta, kalamata olives, red onion and oregano 9-

Watermelon Gazpacho with pickled watermelon rinds, sesame seeds and grilled baguette   6-


Entrees

Roasted summer vegetables with black bean-roasted pepper puree and pepitas 16-      

Pappardelle pasta with roasted peppers and onions, eggplant, cherry tomatoes, olives and fennel 19-

Wood roasted GTF chicken with olive oil fried potatoes, whole roasted peppers, pickled red onions and aji verde 20-

Rhubarb and apple braised pork shoulder with polenta, braised chard and green beans 23-

Seared Chinook salmon with roasted potatoes, green beans and onions, grilled corn, and smoked tomatoes 24-

Grilled striploin steak with potato puree, roasted summer vegetables, and red wine demi glace 24-


Wood-Fired Pizzas

Classic Margherita 11-

Pizza Bianca 11-

Summer squash, roasted bell peppers, and scallions with basil pesto, feta, and herbs 13-

Cherry tomato, onion, and fennel sausage with tomato sauce, mozzarella, and fennel seed 14-

Corn, eggplant, chorizo and shishitos with olive oil, chevre, smoked paprika and cilantro 14-

Lunch Menu: Week of September 4, 2018

*All items and prices subject to change

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and balsamic vinaigrette 7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, hazelnuts, and balsamic vinaigrette 9-

Plate of farm pickled vegetables 6-

Sourdough bread and confit of summer vegetables 8-   

Charentais melon, watermelon, and cucumber salad with apricot vinegar, olive oil, and feta  9-

Heirloom tomatoes, Alsea Acres feta, kalamata olives, red onion and fresh oregano 9-

 Watermelon gazpacho with pickled watermelon rind, sesame seeds and grilled baguette 6-

Pork and beef meatballs with tomato sauce, roasted peppers, breadcrumbs and pecorino 10-


Entrees

 Roasted summer vegetables with smoked black bean roasted pepper puree and pepitas 16-      

 Chinook salmon fish cakes with mixed field greens, farm pickled vegetables, lemon thyme vinaigrette and roasted red pepper aioli 16-

Rhubarb and apple braised pork shoulder with creamy polenta and braised greens 18-

Seared rockfish fettuccine with poached fennel, mushrooms, greens beans, roasted garlic and lemon beurre blanc 20-


Sandwiches

Smoked chorizo on ciabatta with peperonata, garlic aioli, and cilantro 13 / 7.5-

 Oregon Valley Beef pastrami on rye with sauerkraut, swiss cheese and thousand island  13 / 7.5-

Marinated zucchini, tomato, butter lettuce, and basil with salsa verde on pugliese bread 12 / 7-


Wood-Fired Pizzas

Classic Margherita 11-

Quattro Formaggi 11-

Summer squash, roasted bell peppers and scallions with basil pesto, feta, and herbs 13-

Cherry tomato, onion, and fennel sausage with tomato sauce, mozzarella, and fennel seed 14-

Corn, chorizo and shishitos with olive oil, chevre, smoked paprika and cilantro 14-

CSA 2018- Week 13: Como una Flor—The Art of Making Beautiful Bunches

 

CSA Newsletter- Week 13


Welcome to the first week of September! With the cold nights that we’ve been having, things like tomatoes, cucumbers, and summer squash that we would harvest every single day are now growing so slowly that we can only harvest a small amount every two or three days. Picking all of these bulk items is most definitely a summer task, whereas making bunches of greens and roots is more of a spring and fall gig.

The gold beets in your box reminded me of a day earlier this season out in the field, bunching—you guessed it—gold beets. On this particular day, we had a lot of new people on the crew and we spent our day learning and teaching how to make beautiful, even bunches. For beets and other round roots, we are told to make bunches como una flor, like a flower, with one beet in the center and an array of beets around it. As we harvest, we make sure to gently pull the beets from the soil so as not to damage the delicate greens of the smaller beets that we leave behind to keep growing. On that day, we found a gold beet that was uniquely light in color, and we made an exemplary bunch that more than any other was como una flor.

The gold beets in your box reminded me of a day earlier this season out in the field, bunching—you guessed it—gold beets. On this particular day, we had a lot of new people on the crew and we spent our day learning and teaching how to make beautiful, even bunches. For beets and other round roots, we are told to make bunches como una flor, like a flower, with one beet in the center and an array of beets around it. As we harvest, we make sure to gently pull the beets from the soil so as not to damage the delicate greens of the smaller beets that we leave behind to keep growing. On that day, we found a gold beet that was uniquely light in color, and we made an exemplary bunch that more than any other was como una flor.

But that’s just beets! Every single item that we bunch has its own science and art to it. To bunch chard, we wade through the field of bright, rainbow leaves, try to find leaves that are of similar size, and then stack them one on top of the other with a little slap that keeps them from being a floppy mess. To bunch moss parsley, we make sure to rotate the bunch as we make it, forming a perfect little pom pom as we go. To bunch basil, we snap a few stems at a basal node with one hand, always placing the new stems in the center of the bunch so as not to bruise the soft leaves. Carrots fall easily off the bunch, so we always have to make sure to twist the tie around the bunch twice super tight. For cilantro we slip a long knife under the soil to cut under the root, remove the weeds, and bunch from there.

Whatever bunch you’re making, your twist tie can’t be too low or too high, too tight or too loose; the orientation of the leaves and roots must be just so, so that it turns out beautiful every time. Over the next few weeks as more and more bunched items make it into your box, remember that somebody worked hard to make sure that that one bunch was perfect and beautiful, como una flor.

Best, Laura Bennett


Table of Box Contents

  • Gold Beets
  • Eggplant
  • Sweet Bell Peppers
  • Jalapeño
  • Tomatoes
  • Scallions
  • Mixed Summer Squash
  • Persian Cucumbers
  • Yellow Storage Onions
  • Nicola Potatoes
  • Lettuce Surprise

Print

Beet Slaw with Pistachios and Raisins

“The pistachio butter underneath the slaw is like an Asian peanut sauce, bringing a much fuller nut flavor than the pistachios could offer alone. As you eat the dish, the juices from the slaw dissolve the pistachio butter and make a crazy good sort of vinaigrette. Serves 4—adapted from Six Seasons https://www.instagram.com/p/BkQfq1hjxrf/?hl=en&taken-by=jj__mc 

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 2 tbsp white wine vinegar (or any acid)
  • 1 1/4 lb gold beets; mix of colors if you can
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed flat-leaf parsley leaves, basil leaves, or any herb of choice
  • 1/4 cup lightly packed mint leaves
  • 1/2 tsp dried chili flakes
  • salt and pepper
  • olive oil
  • Pistachio butter (or any nut butter)
  • Suggested Additions: cabbage & fennel, sliced thinly

Instructions

  1. Combine the garlic, raisins, and vinegar in a large bowl and let sit for 1 hour.

  2. Grate the beets on the large holes of a box grater or cut into fine julienne. Yes, your hands will get stained, but the color fades quickly.

  3. Remove the garlic from the raisins and discard. And the beets, lemon juice, most of the parsley and mint (save the rest for finishing), and chili flakes. Season with 1.5 tsp salt and lots of black pepper and toss. Let it sit for about 5 minutes and then taste—the slaw should be tart, spicy, peppery, and sweet. Adjust the seasoning, if necessary, then add ¼ cup olive oil. Toss and taste again.

  4. To serve, plate and top with the slaw. Finish with reserved fresh herbs and a drizzle of olive oil.

Print

Alice Waters’ Ratatouille

A genius recipe from Alice Waters' 2007 cookbook The Art of Simple Food: ratatouille that fusses only where it needs to fuss (over the eggplant), and adds a few smart, modern details -- red chile flakes, a basil bouquet -- that improve on a well-worn classic. Note: All vegetables conveniently work out to about a pound. Serves 6-8, Prep Time: 20 min, Cook Time: 50 min —Adapted from https://food52.com/recipes/14155-alice-waters-ratatouille

Ingredients

  • 1 medium or 2 small eggplant, cut into ½-inch dice
  • 4 tbsp olive oil, divided, plus more to taste
  • 2 medium onions, cut into ½-inch dice
  • 4-6 garlic cloves, chopped
  • ½ bunch basil, tied in a bouquet + 6 basil leaves, chopped
  • 1 pinch dried chile flakes
  • 2 sweet peppers, cut into ½-inch dice
  • 3 medium summer squash, cut into ½-inch dice
  • 3 ripe medium tomatoes, cut into ½-inch dice
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Toss the eggplant cubes with a teaspoon or so of salt. Set the cubes in a colander to drain for about 20 minutes.

  2. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a heavy-bottomed pot. Pat the eggplant dry, add to the pan, and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until golden. Add a bit more oil if the eggplant absorbs all the oil and sticks to the bottom of the pan. Remove the eggplant when done and set aside.

  3. In the same pot, pour in 2 more tablespoons olive oil. Add onions and cook for about 7 minutes, or until soft and translucent. Add the garlic, basil bouquet, dried chile flakes, and a bit more salt.

  4. Cook for 2 or 3 minutes, then stir in peppers. Cook for a few more minutes, then stir in summer squash. Cook for a few more minutes, then stir in tomatoes.

  5. Cook for 10 minutes longer, then stir in eggplant and cook for 10 to 15 minutes more, until all the vegetables are soft. Remove the bouquet of basil, pressing on it to extract all its flavors, and adjust the seasoning with salt.

  6. Stir in the chopped basil leaves and more extra virgin olive oil, to taste. Serve warm or cold.

September on the Farm – A Time of Transitions

Here in the Pacific Northwest, we go hard all summer long. We Oregonians know all too well that summer sits precariously in the year like an island amidst a sea of rainy days, and we must make the most of it. So we get lost in the heat of the season, trying to soak up every last ray of sunshine while the days are long, jumping into the river every chance we get, and eating our weight of the sweet summer fruits that we’ll soon miss so much. For us on the farm, summer is the time to, as they say, make hay while the sun shines.

But then the abundance of August gives way to September, and things begin to transition all around us. Summer produce begins its descent away from the apex of abundance, and the nights roll in with a chill that reminds us that our time on this summer island will not last forever.

Though most of us mourn summer’s decline, September really is a unique time of year when we still get to enjoy the last fruits of summer even as the fall harvest begins rolling in. Our greens that have taken a hiatus in the heat are now bursting forth with delicate new leaves, winter squash is ripening up on the vine, and the immense diversity of root vegetables that we grow are sizing up secretly beneath the earth.

Farming requires us to have our bodies in tune with the environment in a way that modern life has worked to distance us from, and to notice the cycles of transition by which we must abide. In this way life demands of us that we be present to experience it if we are to expect it to produce the abundant food that graces your plate.

There are hot times and there are cold times, times of abundance and times of famine, and even more times where the lines between these extremes are not so clear. The food in front of you today is an embodiment of transition, and the flavors to be experienced cannot be found at any other time of year or on any other place on the globe. It is regionality by the spoonful. Nowhere else at this moment will a poblano be developing its deep, mole flavor as it enters its chocolate-red state of ripeness, ready to be combined with a sweet and buttery delicata winter squash fresh from the vine. It is in these times of transition that we can literally taste summer ending while fall begins, all within a single bite. Eat up.

Best,
Laura Bennett

Dinner Menu: August 30-Sept. 1, 2018

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and balsamic vinaigrette 7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, Alsea Acres chevre, hazelnuts, and balsamic vinaigrette 10-

Sourdough bread and summer vegetable confit 7-

Plate of pickled farm vegetables 6-

Roasted peaches with marinated labneh and toasted baguette crostinis  7-

Pork and beef meatballs with tomato sauce, roasted peppers, breadcrumbs and pecorino 10-

Charentais melon, watermelon, and cucumber salad with apricot vinegar, olive oil, and feta  9-

Heirloom tomatoes, Alsea Acres feta, kalamata olives, red onion and basil 9-

Watermelon Gazpacho with pickled watermelon rinds, sesame seeds and grilled baguette   6-



Entrees

Roasted summer vegetables with black bean-roasted pepper puree and pepitas 16-      

Corn and chevre-filled agnolotti pasta with mushrooms, fresh tomatoes, green beans and breadcrumbs 19-

Grilled farm chicken with fried potato cakes, grilled squash and onions, rouille and herb roasted pepper salad 20-

Deck Farms pork chop with potato puree, green beans, braised chard and stewed apples 22-

Oregon Valley Farm osso buco with polenta, roasted summer vegetables, and gremolata 24-

Grilled Deck Farms lamb chops with raita, roasted eggplant, fennel, onions and piperade 24-


Wood-Fired Pizzas

Classic Margherita 11-

Pizza Bianca 11-

Summer squash, roasted bell peppers,  and scallions with basil pesto, feta, and herbs 13-

Cherry tomato, roasted onions, and sage sausage with tomato sauce and mozzarella 14-

Corn, eggplant, chorizo and shishitos with olive oil, chevre, smoked paprika and cilantro 14-


Dessert

Buttermilk panna cotta with cookies and blueberry compote 6-

Peach pie with cinnamon creme fraiche ice cream  7-

Chocolate torte, dark chocolate sauce, chantilly, and cocoa sticks  7-

Scoop of daily ice cream with cookies   6-