Corvallis Market Recipes Season Finale

It has been a pleasure slinging veg in the Corvallis community this season! The sun made a cameo for the last weekend market, making an already perfect day simply magical. I’d like to thank everyone—customers, vendors, fellow marketeers—for making this market season a gem in my memory. On behalf of my crew of wonderful marketeers, I would like to say how grateful we all are to help feed our community and our families—it’s a privilege and a joy.

This country we live in has lost much of its sense of community. We don’t know our neighbors and we no longer gather in village squares. But farmers’ markets are places where community building starts anew. We know our customers, and we feel that they know us. The farmers’ market is our village square, a place where we can all gather together, share in food, and watch the seasons roll by. It could seem like the marketplace is first and foremost a place of commerce, where we come to buy food to sustain our bodies, but my soul ends up being quite nourished as well.

So thank you for being a part of our community, for taking joy in the beautiful food we have to offer, and we hope to see you at the Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. (We will be at market this Wednesday for all of your last minute Thanksgiving needs.)

Here are the recipes we sampled up on Saturday, the last recipes that I’ll be posting until April. This has been GTF’s first year offering this recipe service to its customer base, and I have learned a lot throughout the season. Thank you for your support, thank you for reading, and stick around next year for our second season devoted to food education. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

  • Kabocha Squash with Peacock Kale
  • Delicata Squash with Chocolate Poblanos
  • Parsnip Fries with Watercress Salad

Kabocha Squash with Peacock Kale (November 12th post)

Kabocha and other large squashes lend themselves to easy baking, but being limited to a frying pan at market forces me to cook in creative ways. Trust me, if you stir fry kabocha once, you might never go back. Kabocha is a dry yet intensely flavorful squash, with the sweet and savory flavor similar to a roasted chestnut. Cooking it in the frying pan takes hardly ten minutes, as there is very little water to cook out, and you end up with bites of creamy squash encased within crisp edges.img_3233-2

  • INGREDIENTS:20161113_113149
    • ½ kabocha squash, sliced thin
    • 2 large shallots, finely chopped
    • ½ head elephant garlic (Goodfoot Farm)
    • ½ bu. peacock kale
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Cutting up the big kabocha squash while it’s raw is the hardest part of this recipe. Be safe, take your time, and don’t chop your fingers off however tempting it may be. Follow the chopping tutorial at right, and set aside.
    • Finely chop your shallots.
    • Heat a pan of olive oil up to medium-high temp and add in the shallots, letting cook 2-4 minutes.
    • Add in the kabocha squash slices and stir around. Let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop elephant garlic and add into the pan, continuing to cook uncovered another 2-3 minutes.
    • Finely chop up ½ bunch of Peacock kale and add it into the pan along with 2-3 pinches of salt, stirring around to distribute evenly. Let cook another 2-3 minutes until done to taste, but before the kabocha turns to mush! It’s a race against time, but it’ll always turn out delicious.

Delicata Squash with Chocolate Poblanos (November 5th post)

In this climate, we generally eat poblanos when they’re still green, which is okay because they actually have a great flavor before they color up, unlike green bell peppers. Usually poblanos don’t enter their “chocolate phase” of red-fleshed ripeness before it freezes, but as we have yet to have a freeze we now get to enjoy the illusive “chocolate” poblano. Of course they don’t actually taste like chocolate, but they do develop a flavor similar to a chipotle or mole pepper.img_3236-2

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 1 delicata squash, sliced into half-moons
    • 3-4 poblano peppers, sliced thinly
    • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
    • 1/2 head elephant garlic, chopped finely (Goodfoot Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Cut the ends off your delicata squash to make a flat surface, then stand it on end and slice it in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to remove the seeds. Make thin half-moon slices down the delicata. Set aside.
    • Finely chop the shallots and elephant garlic.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the sliced delicata and let cook covered about 4-6 minutes.
    • Chop the poblanos in half and rip out the seeds and stem (make sure to wash your hands after touching the spicy seeds). Chop each half into thin slices.
    • Add the poblanos, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
    • Let cook a couple more minutes to desired softness. Add more salt to taste, and enjoy! Customers last year said this dish was a hit at Thanksgiving. Personally, I love to eat it for breakfast with hot sauce, melted cheese, and a fried egg on top.

Parsnip Fries with Watercress Salad (May 1st post)pan-fried-parsnips-with-spinach-salad-half-size-1000-pixels-wide

The photo at right shows parsnip fries with spinach salad, which is what I made in May the first time I posted this recipe. This week I used watercress instead of spinach, as seen in the photo below. Watercress is a very delicate green, with a mild arugula-like flavor.

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 1-2 large parsnips, sliced in thin strips
    • 2 bu. watercress
    • 2 medium shallots, minced
    • Balsamic vinegar
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Coat the bottom of the pan in oil, liberally. Place one parsnip strip in the oil, and once it starts sizzling, add enough parsnips to coat the bottom of the pan in a roughly single layer (you may have to do two rounds to fry up a whole plate).
    • Stir every couple minutes to prevent sticking. After about 7-10 minutes, many of the parsnips will turn golden brown img_3239-2on the edges. This is a good sign that they are done.
    • Fish the parsnip fries out of the pan with tongs, allowing most of the oil to drip off before placing them in a bowl. Sprinkle them with salt immediately. This is the magic secret. If you salt the parsnips while they’re in the oil, they will release water and become mushy rather than crispy. Set aside and munch as you work on the salad.
    • In a large bowl, mix together minced shallots, 2-3 pinches of salt, ~1/8 cup balsamic vinegar and ~1/4 cup olive oil. I do a rough 1:2 vinegar to oil ratio, though I don’t actually measure. Mash the shallots with the back of a spoon to release their juicy flavors into the dressing—you’ll instantly be able to smell the difference this makes.
    • Chop up your watercress and toss in the vinaigrette. Taste a leaf. If you think it needs more balsamic, add some more. The vinegar will make the leaves become more and more tender over time, so the longer your plate sits the more delectable it will be!
    • Serve together for a wonderful combination of crispy salty parsnips and mildly spicy watercress salad.
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Vegetables are just too much fun! Here is our kooky Corvallis crew from Saturday, though many lovely people who worked with us throughout the season are not in this photo. See y’all in January!

November 5th Rainy Day Recipes

Thanks to everyone who was able to visit us at market yesterday! One of the perks of setting up a market booth before dawn is getting to watch the sun rise over our vegetable stand, a beauty that I wish more market goers could witness. Once the sun did rise, we sampled up two lovely sautés for people to munch as they escaped from the rain under our tent.

  • Romanesco sautéed with Purple Hazi Carrots
  • Delicata Squash sautéed with Poblanos and Anaheim Peppers

Romanesco sautéed with Purple Hazi Carrotsimg_3100-2

We all eat with our eyes, and for this very reason it is important to not only make food delicious, but to make it beautiful as well. A meal can do so much more than simply sustain us. A meal can be art, a political statement, and a simple joy to be shared with friends and family. Romanesco, maybe more than any other vegetable provides us the opportunity to eat art, and visually it looks even more amazing when balanced with bright purple carrots. Customers were stealing bites out of the pan before I even finished cooking, so the picture at right shows the half-eaten dish.

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 1 Sweet Onion, sliced thin
    • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
    • 4-5 Purple Hazi Carrots, sliced into discs
    • 1/2 head Elephant Garlic, chopped finely (Goodfoot Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt to taste
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
    • Slice the ends of your sweet onion and cut in half before making thin slices. Yesterday was probably the last day that we’ll have sweet onions, as their high sugar content doesn’t make them ideal for storing.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the onion and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
    • While that’s cooking, slice up your carrots into thin discs. Often times purple vegetables end up becoming washed out after you cook them, but these Purple Hazi carrots retain their vibrant color in the cooking process. Add into the pan and continue to cook covered another couple minutes while you chop garlic.
    • Finely chop the elephant garlic and add it along with 1-2 pinches salt. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the romanesco and carrots are cooked but still have some crunch.
    • Enjoy!

Delicata Squash sautéed with Poblanos and Anaheim Peppersimg_3097-2

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 1 Delicata squash, sliced into half-moons
    • 3-4 Poblano peppers, sliced thinly
    • 2 Red Anaheim peppers, sliced thinly
    • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
    • 1/2 head Elephant Garlic, chopped finely (Goodfoot Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Cut the ends off your delicata squash to make a flat surface, then stand it on end and slice it in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to remove the seeds. Make thin half-moon slices down the delicata. Set aside.
    • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the sliced delicata and let cook covered about 4-6 minutes.
    • Chop the poblanos and Anaheims in half and rip out the seeds and stem (make sure to wash your hands after touching the spicy seeds). Chop each half into thin slices.
    • Add the poblanos, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
    • Let cook a couple more minutes to desired softness. Add more salt to taste, and enjoy! Customers last year said this dish was a hit at Thanksgiving. Personally, I love to eat it for breakfast with hot sauce, melted cheese, and a fried egg on top.

October 8th Market Recipes ft. Hakurei Turnips

This Saturday was one of my favorite markets of the season. It was a perfect autumnal Oregon day, complete with a misty morning and a beautiful sunny afternoon. Tis the season of cool days and warm sautés. This week I’m throwing in some photos of our market booth at the end of the recipes, everything was just too beautiful not to share. Happy cooking everyone! img_2948-2

  • Kohlrabi, raw (June 4th post)
  • Watermelon Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Black Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Hakurei Turnip: Raw & Tamari Stir Fry
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéed

RECIPES:

  • Hakurei Turnip Tamari Stir Fry
    • For those of you who had the luxury of tasting these sweet treats in the spring, the rumors are true, Hakurei turnips are back in season. Raw, these turnips are soft and sweet and pure with fall magic. They can be eaten like an apple, added to a salad, or my favorite- used as a vehicle for dip. If you can stop munching them raw for a moment and use them in a stir fry, they are extremely satiating. There is no reason to not utilize the entire plant in the stir fry- the roots, stems, and leaves are all delicious and add to the meal.img_2947-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 2 bunches Hakurei Turnips
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head Garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive Oil
      • Tamari
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic and set both aside.
      • Remove the tails and tops from the Hakurei turnips, cut them in half, and then slice them thin.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in 3-5 Tbsp of tamari and let cook another minute, allowing the tamari to reduce ever so slightly.
      • Add in your Hakurei turnips and the garlic at this point. Adding garlic later in the cooking process preserves its flavor, which you definitely want when you’ve spent the time to peel and mince. Let cook about 3 minutes.
      • Roughly chop the turnip greens and stems and add them into the sauté. Add another splash of tamari  and a pinch or two of salt and let cook 1-2 minutes.
      • Turn off the pan and add more salt and tamari to taste if needed. Serve as is or over rice.
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
    • This amazing dish can only be enjoyed in a small window of time when we still have summer peppers hanging on despite winter squash encroaching on our market shelves. It was a favorite last year at market and continues to be one of mine, as the smoky poblano flavor compliments the creamy sweet delicata so well.
    • INGREDIENTS:img_2958-2
      • 1 Delicata squash, sliced into half-moons
      • 3-4 Poblano peppers, sliced thinly
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Cut the ends off your delicata squash to make a flat surface, then stand it on end and slice it in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to remove the seeds. Make thin half-moon slices down the delicata. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the sliced delicata and let cook covered about 4-6 minutes.
      • Chop the poblanos in half and rip out the seeds and stem (make sure to wash your hands after touching the spicy seeds). Chop each half into thin slices.
      • Add the poblanos, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
      • Let cook a couple more minutes to desired softness. Add more salt to taste, and enjoy! Customers last year said this dish was a hit at Thanksgiving.
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéedimg_2954-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 1 head Broccoli, broken into pieces
      • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
      • 2-3 Carrots, sliced into discs
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the broccoli and romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
      • Slice up a few carrots just to add some color to the green sauté. Add them into pan along with garlic and 1-2 pinches salt. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the broccoli and romanesco are cooked but still have some crunch.
      • Enjoy!

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Potato Varieties from left to right: Mountain Rose, Nicola, Rose Apple Finn Red Fingerlings, Purple Majesty, French Yellow Fingerlings

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September 24th Market Recipes ft. Poblanos with Purple Potatoes

It’s that wonderful time of year when autumn has just20160903_074715-2 begun, and our market stands are filled with both summer and fall foods. Yesterday at the Corvallis Farmers market our sample table was a perfect example of this, with a rainbow of fresh watermelon samples next to hearty fall sautes.

For those of you lovelies who have been reading these market recipe posts regularly, I apologize for posting sporadically during peak season. Now that things are beginning to slow down at the farm I finally have time to post again. Thank you for your support! Here’s everything we sampled up downtown yesterday.

  • Watermelon: orange, yellow, and sorbet20160924_112541-2
    • The season is coming to and end, we’ll have to eat as much melon as we can before they’re gone!
  • Specialty Melons: Charentais cantaloupe, Honey orange
  • Hot Chioggia Beet Salad (July 9th post)

NEW RECIPES

Poblanos with Purple Potatoes

  • Ingredients:
    • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
    • 6 medium purple potatoes: slice each potato in half, then slice in half again before making thin slices down the length of the potatoimg_2596-2
    • 6 poblano peppers, roughly chopped
    • 1 head garlic, chopped finely (We don’t currently have garlic, but Goodfoot farm has an excellent crop this year!)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
  • Directions:
    • I like to chop everything in this dish before I even turn on the pan, because the timing needs to be right so that the potatoes and peppers finish at the same time. I often have trouble burning potatoes when cooking them with other vegetables, but I’ve found a little trick that takes away most of that risk. After you chop your potatoes thinly, spread them out on the cutting board and place a cloth or paper towel over them. Press down on the potatoes to remove as much water from them as you can. It makes a big difference! (And it works perfectly for hash browns.)
    • Note that the poblano seeds are often very spicy, so you’ll want to wash your hands well after removing them. A small amount of heat is retained in the peppers themselves, but for the most part it just offers an incredibly full flavor.img_2628-2
    • Coat the bottom of the pan in olive oil and heat it up to medium high temperature; if a piece of shallot sizzles in the oil it’s up to temp.
    • Add in the shallots, stir them around, and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the poblanos next, as they will take longer to cook than the thinly sliced potatoes. Cover and let cook 7-10 minutes.
    • The peppers should be about halfway done at this point; add in the potatoes and the garlic and let cook with the lid on another 5 minutes.
    • Remove the lid and add in 3-4 pinches of salt; stir. Let cook another 2-5 minutes with the lid off until the veggies are done to your satisfaction. I usually take out a sample to taste before deciding when a dish is done.
    • Optional Deliciousness:
      • This dish is my staple breakfast! I always add cheese, fried eggs, and hot sauce to tie everything together, and I highly recommend it. I even freeze bags of raw poblano slices so that I can make this all winter long.

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Fried Shishito Peppers

  • Shishito peppers look similar to a padrone, another small, green, thin-walled pepper, though they aren’t spicy 99% of the time (you never do know with peppers). Because they are so small, you don’t need to bother slicing them up. Cooking them whole retains moisture, saves time, and it’s fun to just pick one off the plate and eat the pepper straight off the stem.img_2638-2
  • Ingredients:
    • 2 pints shishitos
    • Oil, preferably high heat (not olive oil)
    • Salt
  • Directions:
    • Heat the oil up in the pan to medium high and dump the shishitos into the pan whole. Cover with a grease screen to avoid splattering.
    • Let the peppers fry in the oil 5-10 minutes, stirring them around occasionally.
    • Salt the peppers with 2-3 big pinches and let fry another 2-5 minutes.
    • Serve as a snack or side dish. I forgot to take pictures of samples at market yesterday so I recreated everything at home this morning. We ate the shishitos along with our poblano potatoes and they were delicious!

2016 CSA – Week 8: The Value of Variety

CSA Week 8 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 8


The Value of Variety

A seemingly simple question was posed to me the other week: Why grow this yellow flying saucer squash when you can just grow a regular green zucchini? In the moment, I didn’t have a great answer, but the question got me thinking about the many reasons that variety and biodiversity are important to our farm system.

On a farm, there are so many factors and considerations that determine what we grow. Of course, we want to grow products that we can sell and that are tasty. Because we sell at a variety of markets, to chefs and restaurants, grocery stores, and directly to people like you, there is a wide variation of products, sizes desired within our broad market creating a diverse demand therefore, more variety means more possibilities of meeting people’s needs. Also, product diversity certainly makes our farmers market setups look beautiful and inviting!

On the farm, the seasons often dictate what we grow, and we can extend seasons by growing varieties that are early season, heat tolerant, overwintering, etc. Other on-farm considerations include days to maturity (how long it takes to grow), yield, ease of harvest, disease resistance, and storability.

In the case of the flying saucer squash, its fun shape and firm, nutty texture make it a squash we’ll continue to grow. With all of the complexities and variables in agriculture, sometimes it’s that simple!

Happy August and enjoy your salsa box!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

2 Poblano Peppers ($2.00) – Stuff as chile rellenos, or incorporate into a potato and corn hash

Bunched Golden Beets ($3.00)

☐ 1 Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

1 Red Torpedo Onion ($1.50) – The long, cylindrical shape of this onion lends itself well to slicing rounds for salad.

☐ 1 Jalapeno ($.50) – Add a little kick to your salsa or pico de gallo

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

Cilantro ($2.00) – Use in salad, salsa, or to garnish any dish

1 lb Tomatillos (4-6) ($3.00) – Roast them and make salsa verde

☐ 4 zucchini ($3.50) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread

2 Big Beef Tomatoes ($4.50)

4 Ears of Corn ($3.00) – Boil or grill and eat straight off the cob or cut off the ear and add to stir-fry or salsa

Box Market Value: $32.25

Recipes

Pico de Gallo

Make this simple, fresh salsa using your tomatoes, white onion, jalapeno, and cilantro.

The tomatoes will most likely be the limiting factor so chop those first and add chopped onions and cilantro to taste. Depending on your heat preference, add chopped jalapeno. Add a little salt and lime and adjust ingredients to taste.

Tomatillo Salsa

Ingredients

  • 5 medium tomatillos
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 serrano chiles (or jalapeno)
  • Handful chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • salt to taste

Preparation

  1. Peel and wash the tomatillos. Split and seed the chiles. Place the tomatillos and chiles under a broiler for about 4 minutes each side.
  2. Transfer the blackened tomatillos, chiles, and any juices from the pan to a blender or food processor. Simply add the rest of the ingredients and blend.
  3. This is the absolute basic recipe. Try adding garlic, cumin, avocado, and/or lime.

Poblano, Potato, and Corn Gratin

This dish is a bit indulgent but potatoes, corn, and poblanos are such a great combination, I couldn’t resist!  For a lighter version, cut the potatoes into chunks, salute with onions and olive oil for 10 minutes and then add the poblanos and corn. Sauté until ingredients are cooked through and add salt and pepper to taste.

 Ingredients

  •  3 teaspoons olive oil, divided
  • 2 large fresh poblano chiles, stemmed, seeded, cut into 2×1/4-inch strips
  • 1 1/4 pounds potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 cup cooked corn, cut off the cob
  • 1 cup coarsely grated Oaxaca cheese or whole-milk mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups half and half
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Rub 9 1/2-inch-diameter deep-dish glass pie dish or cast-iron skillet with 2 teaspoons oil. Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add poblano strips and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. Arrange 1/3 of potato rounds, overlapping slightly, in prepared pie dish. Sprinkle 1/3 of poblano strips over, then 1/3 of corn and 1/3 of cheese. Repeat with 1/3 of potatoes, 1/3 of poblanos, 1/3 of corn, and 1/3 of cheese. Top with remaining potatoes, poblanos, and corn, reserving remaining 1/3 of cheese. Place dish on rimmed baking sheet.
  3. Whisk half and half, flour, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper in small bowl. Pour over potato mixture in pie dish; press potatoes to submerge. Cover dish tightly with foil. Bake 30 minutes. Remove foil; sprinkle remaining cheese over gratin. Continue to bake gratin until potatoes are tender and cheese is golden brown, about 25 minutes longer. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

Read More: Bon Appétit