2016 CSA – Week 14: Tomatoes Aplenty

csa-week-14-graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 14


Tomatoes Aplenty

Put plainly, this has been a bountiful year for tomatoes. We planted the same amount of row feet in tomatoes as we did last year but this year we have so many more! The variables that contribute to the success of a crop are numerous, including location, fertility, plant variety, and even weather.

Grafting has been an ongoing project in which we improve our process each year. The grafted root stock can improve disease resistance and vigor over the course of the season resulting in healthier, higher producing plants. Additionally, the scion (vegetative, fruiting part of the plant) variety selection plays a large role in disease resistance and ultimately yield. This year, we grafted varieties that are bred for improved disease resistance in greenhouse conditions and we are certainly seeing some great results!

Even with 9 markets a week, restaurant orders, and the CSA, and our own tomato roasting efforts, we still have tomatoes galore!

A few folks have asked about ordering additional produce for canning and preservation. I am extending the invitation to all CSA members that we are taking bulk orders for tomatoes and some additional produce. Email Chris at gtf@gatheringtogetherfarm.com to place an order.


Table of Box Contents

☐  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐  1 Red Watermelon ($6.00)

☐  2 Colored Bell Peppers ($4.00) – Delicious sautéed with onions and garlic and served with eggs. Also, try adding them to cornbread, see recipe.  

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

  Green Kale ($3.00) – Sauté with onions and garlic, use in soup, or make a kale and cabbage salad, see recipe.

2 Dried Sweet Onions ($2.25)

☐  Red Cabbage ($6.00) – Try making coleslaw with fresh mint and golden raisins or make kale and cabbage salad, see recipe.

☐  Italian Parsley ($2.00) – This bold, hearty herb is delicious in salads and dressings and it also makes a nice pesto, see recipe.

☐  2 lbs Big Beef Tomatoes ($6.00)

Box Market Value: $37.00

 

Recipes

Loaded Cornbread

I made cornbread for the first time in a long time last week and I forgot how delicious it is! I adapted the recipe by adding grated cheese, fresh corn cut off the cob (raw), scallions, and chipotle powder. I don’t often cook with buttermilk but it is worth getting for this recipe. Incorporate chopped peppers, onions, herbs, dried spices or other flavors. The possibilities are endless!

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus butter for baking dish
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 1/2 cups buttermilk

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Lightly grease an 8-inch baking dish.
    In a large bowl, mix together the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  2. In a separate bowl, mix together the eggs, buttermilk, and butter. Pour the buttermilk mixture into the cornmeal mixture and fold together until there are no dry spots (the batter will still be lumpy). Pour the batter into the prepared baking dish.
  3. Bake until the top is golden brown and tester inserted into the middle of the corn bread comes out clean, about 20 to 25 minutes. Remove the cornbread from the oven and let it cool for 10 minutes before serving.

I prefer to bake cornbread in a cast iron skillet. Leave it in the oven as it preheats and pour the batter in when the skillet is hot out of the oven.

Read More: FoodNetwork

 

Kale and Red Cabbage Slaw with Turmeric Tahini Dressing

Ingredients

  • 1 Red cabbage
  • 1 bunch Fresh kale
  • 1/2 cup Toasted hazelnuts
  • 1 tablespoon Poppy seeds
  • 2 tablespoons Tahini
  • 1 tablespoon Organic raw honey
  • 1/2 cup Fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon Sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon Turmeric powder

Preparation

  1. Chop the red cabbage in the food processor and use a knife to roughly chop the kale (do not remove the stems, as they’re also loaded with nutrients). Place both in a big bowl. Serve garnished with toasted hazelnuts.
  2. Place the dressing ingredients in a blender and process to obtain a smooth paste.
  3. Pour it over the veggies, add the poppy seeds and stir to combine.

Read More: Food52

 

Parsley Thyme Pesto

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups Italian flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 cup thyme leaves
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 1 lemon, zested
  • 1/2 cup toasted walnuts
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt

Preparation

Combine parsley, thyme leaves, lemon zest, Parmesan, walnuts, and garlic in a food processor. When finely chopped, add olive oil in a steady stream until pesto is smooth. Season to taste with salt.

Read More: Food52

2016 CSA – Week 10: Onion Harvest…Waiting for the Flop

CSA Week 10 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 10


Onion Harvest: Waiting for the Flop

In early spring, we seeded about 800 flats of onions and shallots in the greenhouse (that’s over 19,000 onions!). These guys have spent the summer growing in the fields and now the tops are beginning to flop. This is an indication that they are done growing. Once the majority of the onions have flopped, they are pulled, by hand, from the ground and laid on the soil surface for a few days. This allows the roots to dry, decreasing the chance of rot
during storage.

The onions are then loaded onto trucks and transported from the field into greenhouses for curing. Curing allows the onion to dry and for a protective skin to form. We typically let them cure for at least one week, sometimes longer if we are busy harvesting other crops! Once the onions have
dried, the tops and roots are trimmed and they are placed in wooden crates for storage. If the crop is healthy and the storage conditions are right, these onions will last through the beginning of next year. You can never have too many onions in my book!

Have a great week.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

☐ Lettuce ($2.00)
☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)
☐ 1 Eggplant ($4.50) – See the recipes for a delicious eggplant sauce.
☐ 2 Colored Bell Peppers ($4.00) – Grill or broil and use in soups, sandwiches,
dips, or salad.
☐ 1 Red Cipollini onion ($1.00) – Cipollinis are lovely roasted or caramelized and can be used in any recipe calling for onion.
☐ 1 White Cipollini onion ($1.00)
☐ 2 Dried Sweet onions ($1.25) – Store in a cool, dry place.
☐ 1 Fennel Bulb ($2.00) – For fennel lovers, use the fronds as the greens in
your favorite pesto recipe.
☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)
☐ 2-3 Zucchini ($2.50)
☐ 1 lb Romano Beans ($4.00) – Substitute these beans for green beans in any
recipe. Delicious blanched or sautéed.
☐ 3 lbs Heirloom Tomatoes (3) ($12.00) – You can’t go wrong with these beautiful tomatoes. Sandwiches, caprese salad, pasta, or slice, salt, and eat with a knife and fork!
☐ 4 Ears of Corn ($4.00) – Picked by farmer John himself. Steam or grill
(with husk on) and eat with salt and butter. For a culinary adventure, make fresh polenta!

Box Market Value: $44.00

 

Recipes

Ottolenghi’s Eggplant Sauce

This recipe is adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s book Plenty. The full recipe includes making a fresh corn polenta which is topped with this sauce. However, the sauce sounded so good it seems that it would be delicious on just about anything! Check out the full recipe at Food 52.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 medium eggplant, cut into 3/4-inch dice
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • 1/4cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup chopped peeled tomatoes (fresh or canned)
  • 6 1/2tablespoons water
  • 1/4teaspoon salt
  • 1/4teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped oregano

Preparation

  1. Heat up the oil in a large saucepan and fry the eggplant on medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until nicely brown.
  2. Drain off as much oil as you can and discard it — the safest way to do this is to scoop out the eggplant to a plate using a slotted spoon, then pour off the oil into a bowl before added the eggplant back in. You can save the oil to fry lamb chops or eggs in tomorrow.
  3. Add the tomato paste to the pan and stir with the eggplant.
  4. Cook for 2 minutes, then add the wine and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add the chopped tomatoes, water, salt, sugar and oregano and cook for a further 5 minutes to get a deep-flavored sauce.
  6. Set aside; warm it up when needed.


Jalapeno Corn Fritters

This is not the type of thing that I would make regularly, but a good fritter sure is delicious! For a slightly lighter version, omit the bacon and cheese.

 Ingredients

  • 3 c. fresh corn
  • 2/3 c. cornmeal
  • 1/4 c. shredded Cheddar
  • 1/4 c. cream cheese
  • 2 scallions, sliced
  • 2 slices cooked bacon, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 jalapeño, finely diced
  • kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil or canola oil
  • Juice of 1 lime, divided
  • Sour cream, for serving

Preparation

  1. In a medium bowl, combine corn, cornmeal, cheddar, cream cheese, scallions, bacon, eggs, the juice of half a lime, and jalapeño.
  2. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper to taste. Using your hands, form the mixture into small patties.
  3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  4. Working in batches, fry the patties until they’re golden brown, about 3 to 4 minutes per sidee.

Read More: Delish

2016 CSA – Week 9: Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie

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CSA Newsletter – week 9


Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie Mobile

One of the things that I love about farming is the constant need for innovation. Challenges arise on a daily basis and it takes creativity and ingenuity to move forward — constant problem solving.

Farmer John Eveland has had a longstanding innovation challenge that came to fruition last week with the inaugural trip of the GTF Mobile Veggie Truck. John hopes that this truck will help the farm bring veggies to folks in under-served areas without regular access to fresh, organic produce.

Since acquiring a retired bottled water truck a few years ago, John has been working away at retrofitting the truck as a veggie mobile. This meant installing pop up awnings, custom built in pop out displays, oh and giving the retired truck’s engine a bit of a tune up!

It has certainly been a shared project as our agronomist took on the task of fabricating the awnings, a local carpenter designed and built the pop out displays, and two local artists painted a beautiful mural on the back.

It is really fun to see that after many years of farming, there are always new, exciting things on the horizon.

Have a wonderful week!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐ Green Cabbage ($4.50)

1 Colored Bell Pepper ($2.00) – Grill or broil pepper halves. Let cool and remove skin. Use to make in salads, eggs, on sandwiches, or make romesco.

☐ 2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75)

1 Dried Red Onion ($0.75)

1 Sweet Italian Pepper ($1.00) – Eat fresh in salads, grill, or sauté. Substitute in any recipe calling for bell peppers.

☐ 2 Jimmy Nardello Peppers ($1.25) – Great for sautéing or frying, see recipe.

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

½ lb Spinach ($4.50)

☐ 4 Zucchini ($3.50)

¾ lbs Green Beans ($3.00) – Blanch or sauté plain or season with bacon, garlic, butter, lemon juice, or make garlic and ginger string beans (see recipe).

2 Tomatoes (~1 lb) ($3.00)

1 Pint Cherry Tomatoes ($3.50)

Box Market Value: $36.50

 

Recipes

Beyond the Bell Pepper: Jimmy Nardello Sweet Italian Frying Pepper

This variety was brought to the US in the late 1800’s by an Italian family and was grown by them for almost 100 years. The seed was donated to the seed savers exchange in 1983, before Jimmy Nardello passed away at the age of 81.

The Jimmy Nardello pepper has a characteristic scrunch towards the stem and has thinner flesh than the more common bell peppers. This thin flesh lends itself well to frying rather than roasting as with bell type sweet peppers.

Fried Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  1. Slice peppers in half lengthwise (removing seeds optional)
  2. Heat olive oil in a frying pan on medium-low heat
  3. Add the peppers to the frying pan stirring constantly until the skins are blistered and the peppers are slightly wilted, 6-8 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and serve.

Serving Suggestions:

  • Sauté with garlic (add at the end of cooking) and/or other herbs such as parsley.
  • Pairs well with a soft cheese such as goat chèvre, fresh mozzarella, burrata.
  • Also delicious served on top of steak.

 

String Beans with Ginger and Garlic

Sometimes a very simple recipe is the best way to enjoy such high quality, fresh food. This NYT cooking recipe is simple and delicious. If you’re not inspired by garlic and ginger, use the bean preparation technique and season your beans with something else to your liking. This recipe can easily be adjusted to a larger quantity of beans.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pounds string beans (French-style slim haricots verts work especially well), trimmed
  • 1 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger (about 2 inches ginger root, peeled)
  • 1 medium-size garlic clove, minced

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and fill a large bowl with ice water. Boil beans until just tender but still crisp and bright green. Start testing after 4 minutes or so, being careful not to overcook. When done, plunge beans into ice water to stop cooking, lift out immediately when cool and drain on towels. (Recipe can be made to this point up to a day in advance and kept refrigerated, wrapped in towels.)
  2. When ready to cook, heat oil in a wide skillet over high heat. Add beans, ginger and garlic, and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until beans are heated through and ginger and garlic are softened and aromatic. Sprinkle with salt, and remove to a serving dish.

Read More: NYT Cooking

 

2016 CSA – Week 8: The Value of Variety

CSA Week 8 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 8


The Value of Variety

A seemingly simple question was posed to me the other week: Why grow this yellow flying saucer squash when you can just grow a regular green zucchini? In the moment, I didn’t have a great answer, but the question got me thinking about the many reasons that variety and biodiversity are important to our farm system.

On a farm, there are so many factors and considerations that determine what we grow. Of course, we want to grow products that we can sell and that are tasty. Because we sell at a variety of markets, to chefs and restaurants, grocery stores, and directly to people like you, there is a wide variation of products, sizes desired within our broad market creating a diverse demand therefore, more variety means more possibilities of meeting people’s needs. Also, product diversity certainly makes our farmers market setups look beautiful and inviting!

On the farm, the seasons often dictate what we grow, and we can extend seasons by growing varieties that are early season, heat tolerant, overwintering, etc. Other on-farm considerations include days to maturity (how long it takes to grow), yield, ease of harvest, disease resistance, and storability.

In the case of the flying saucer squash, its fun shape and firm, nutty texture make it a squash we’ll continue to grow. With all of the complexities and variables in agriculture, sometimes it’s that simple!

Happy August and enjoy your salsa box!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

2 Poblano Peppers ($2.00) – Stuff as chile rellenos, or incorporate into a potato and corn hash

Bunched Golden Beets ($3.00)

☐ 1 Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

1 Red Torpedo Onion ($1.50) – The long, cylindrical shape of this onion lends itself well to slicing rounds for salad.

☐ 1 Jalapeno ($.50) – Add a little kick to your salsa or pico de gallo

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

Cilantro ($2.00) – Use in salad, salsa, or to garnish any dish

1 lb Tomatillos (4-6) ($3.00) – Roast them and make salsa verde

☐ 4 zucchini ($3.50) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread

2 Big Beef Tomatoes ($4.50)

4 Ears of Corn ($3.00) – Boil or grill and eat straight off the cob or cut off the ear and add to stir-fry or salsa

Box Market Value: $32.25

Recipes

Pico de Gallo

Make this simple, fresh salsa using your tomatoes, white onion, jalapeno, and cilantro.

The tomatoes will most likely be the limiting factor so chop those first and add chopped onions and cilantro to taste. Depending on your heat preference, add chopped jalapeno. Add a little salt and lime and adjust ingredients to taste.

Tomatillo Salsa

Ingredients

  • 5 medium tomatillos
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 serrano chiles (or jalapeno)
  • Handful chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • salt to taste

Preparation

  1. Peel and wash the tomatillos. Split and seed the chiles. Place the tomatillos and chiles under a broiler for about 4 minutes each side.
  2. Transfer the blackened tomatillos, chiles, and any juices from the pan to a blender or food processor. Simply add the rest of the ingredients and blend.
  3. This is the absolute basic recipe. Try adding garlic, cumin, avocado, and/or lime.

Poblano, Potato, and Corn Gratin

This dish is a bit indulgent but potatoes, corn, and poblanos are such a great combination, I couldn’t resist!  For a lighter version, cut the potatoes into chunks, salute with onions and olive oil for 10 minutes and then add the poblanos and corn. Sauté until ingredients are cooked through and add salt and pepper to taste.

 Ingredients

  •  3 teaspoons olive oil, divided
  • 2 large fresh poblano chiles, stemmed, seeded, cut into 2×1/4-inch strips
  • 1 1/4 pounds potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 cup cooked corn, cut off the cob
  • 1 cup coarsely grated Oaxaca cheese or whole-milk mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups half and half
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Rub 9 1/2-inch-diameter deep-dish glass pie dish or cast-iron skillet with 2 teaspoons oil. Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add poblano strips and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. Arrange 1/3 of potato rounds, overlapping slightly, in prepared pie dish. Sprinkle 1/3 of poblano strips over, then 1/3 of corn and 1/3 of cheese. Repeat with 1/3 of potatoes, 1/3 of poblanos, 1/3 of corn, and 1/3 of cheese. Top with remaining potatoes, poblanos, and corn, reserving remaining 1/3 of cheese. Place dish on rimmed baking sheet.
  3. Whisk half and half, flour, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper in small bowl. Pour over potato mixture in pie dish; press potatoes to submerge. Cover dish tightly with foil. Bake 30 minutes. Remove foil; sprinkle remaining cheese over gratin. Continue to bake gratin until potatoes are tender and cheese is golden brown, about 25 minutes longer. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

Read More: Bon Appétit

2016 CSA – Week 7: Seed Selection: Growing Larger Grey Shallots

CSA Week 7 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 7


Seed Selection: Growing Larger Grey Shallots

Most of the seed that we use at our farm comes from seed companies around the country from Johnny’s Select Seeds in Maine to Osborne Seed Company in Washington and everywhere in-between.  Sometimes our seeds are even sourced from companies in Europe. Specialty crops such as potatoes and ginger, that are cultivated vegetatively, are often source from specific farms that grow specific varieties for seed.

While we typically leave seed selection and saving up to seed companies sometimes, we do some seed saving of our own. Several years ago, we acquired some grey shallot seed from a farmer in Southern Oregon. Grey Shallots are a true shallot which means they only reproduce vegetatively. Grey shallot seed is simply a grey shallot that is planted in the ground to grow and reproduce more. Since then, we have been selecting the largest, best-looking shallots each year as seed for next year’s crop.

This week, I had the opportunity to be a part of the grey shallot seed selection process. We set aside 1,000 of the biggest shallots from this year’s harvest. This year’s seed is about three times larger than the seed that we started with initially! I am certainly looking forward to even larger grey shallots next year.

Have a great week and enjoy those veggies.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

2 Anaheim Peppers ($2.00) – This versatile, mild chili pepper can be used in chili rellenos, salsa, or in any recipe that calls for peppers.

Fresh Cipollini Onions ($2.50) – Delicious in eggs, salad, or grilled

1 Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

1 Colored Bell Pepper ($2.00)

Bunched Purple Carrots ($3.50)

1 Bunch Basil ($3.00) – Make pesto or caprese salad with your heirloom tomato and some fresh mozzarella.

2 Leeks ($3.00) – Delicious  and very versatile. Enjoy them grilled, sautéed, in soup, or in a savory galette or frittata.

1 Bunch Swiss Chard ($3.00) – Sauté and put in a savory galette and make a dip with the stems. See recipes!

2 Cucumbers ($2.00)

1 Heirloom Tomato ($4.50)

1 Pint Strawberries ($4.00)

Box Market Value: $35.25

 

Recipes

Romesco

Romesco is a delicious Catalonian roasted pepper sauce that can be used as a dip, dressing, or eaten all by itself. I first had it in our very own Farmstand and was blown away by its rich, smoky flavor.

There are many variations of romesco. This simple recipe comes from my friend Lisa, the person who introduced me to this wonderful sauce.

Ingredients

  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 peeled, roasted bell peppers
  • (roast on the grill or in the oven)
  • ½ cup olive oil (more to taste)
  • ½ cup roasted almonds
  • lemon juice to taste
  • salt to taste
  1. Grind the nuts and garlic in a food processor until the mixture is fairly fine
  2. Add the peppers and a pinch of salt and process to combine
  3. While processor is running, slowly add the olive oil. Add salt, lemon juice, and olive oil to taste.

What to Do with Those Stems?

I always use the stems of my chard. I either add them to my sauté before the leaves or set them aside for use in making stock. However, I haven’t ventured to make any dishes that feature the chard stems themselves.

Once I started looking, I found recipes for chard stems. I love this NYT Cooking recipe for Swiss chard stem dip but the recipes for pickled Swiss chard stems, Chard Stems with Sesame-Yogurt Sauce and Black Sesame Seeds, Baked Swiss Chard Stems Recipe with Olive Oil and Parmesan sound delicious too!

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Swiss chard stalks, coarsely chopped (about 4 cups)
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 to 4garlic cloves (to taste), peeled, green shoots removed
  • ½cup sesame tahini, stirred if the oil has separated
  • ¼ to ½cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste
  • 1tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Preparation

Steam the chard stalks about 15 minutes or until tender when pierced with a fork. Drain well, and allow to cool. Place in a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Puree, stopping the machine from time to time to scrape down the sides.

In a mortar, mash the garlic with 1/2 teaspoon salt until you have a smooth paste (you can also do this in the food processor). Add to the chard stalks. Process until smooth. Add the tahini, and again process until smooth. With the machine running, add the lemon juice and salt to taste. Stop the machine, taste and adjust seasonings.

Read More: Swiss Chard Stalk and Tahini Dip


Galette: The Sweet and Savory Catchall

Galettes are one of my favorite things to make. Take whatever is in season (or in your fridge), fold it up in your favorite pie crust, and it is guaranteed to be delicious. I typically make sweet galettes (because I have a terrible sweet tooth) but savory ones are equally delicious. 

If you have a favorite pie crust recipe, use that. Recently, I have been making an all butter crust from the NYT Cooking section that is simple and delicious. I typically bake my galettes in a hot oven (375-400) until the crust is golden brown and the filling has set (40-50 minutes)

Galette Tips:

-Sauté greens, onions, mushrooms, etc, before baking

-Drain excess liquid from ingredients before filling crust to prevent a soggy bottom

-Add cheese, herbs, mustard, pesto, etc as a base before adding filling

-Toss fruit with a bit of cornstarch or flour absorb excess moisture

-Leave room around the edges to fold over the crust, about 2-3 inches

-Brush crust with egg for a golden brown sheen and sprinkle with sugar or cheese
Read More: