October 29th Market Recipes ft. Romanesco

Our brassicas are loving this crisp autumn weather! The brassica family is home to many fall favorites, such as romanesco, kohlrabi, radishes, and cabbage. Sadly I wasn’t able to take pictures before our samples were gobbled up yesterday, so I’ve included some other market photos for your viewing pleasure. Here’s what we sampled up downtown in the cool sunshine:

  • Watermelon Radishes, raw (October 8th Post)img_2948-2
  • Black Radishes, raw (October 8th Post)
  • Romanesco with Leeks and Chard Stem
  • Gill’s Golden Pippin Acorn Squash with Pimento Peppers

Romanesco with Leeks and Chard Stem:

Romanesco, although commonly thought of as a type of cauliflower, is actually just as separate from cauliflower as broccoli is. The formation and placement of leaves and other plant parts is called Phylotaxy, a process driven by the famous Fibonacci Sequence. Romanesco may be one of the only plants where the bare bones of this complicated mathematical form is visible and available for appreciation by the human eye. If you can bring yourself to cut into this beauty, Romanesco has an amazing nutty, cauliflower-like flavor.14656421_1322301794446585_2603067765083979695_n

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 2 Leeks, sliced thin
    • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
    • 1 bunch Chard, stems only
    • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely (Beene Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
    • Slice your leeks thinly. The entire leek is edible, even the dark green part! They cook down just the same.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the leeks and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
    • Remove the stems from your chard leaves by slicing them out individually with your knife. Once you have a pile of bright stems, slice them thinly and add them into the pan.  Let cook another 3-5 minutes. I don’t like to crowd romanesco with leafy greens so that their beauty can be most appreciated, so the chard stem is a nice addition that adds some color without stealing the spotlight. But do make sure to save your greens and use them for some other delicious meal!
    • Finely chop the garlic and add it along with 1-2 pinches salt and pepper. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the romanesco is cooked but still has some crunch.
    • Enjoy!

Gill’s Golden Pippin Acorn Squash with Pimento Peppers:

Acorn squash is the one winter squash that I grew up eating, which is strange since it is notoriously the blander of the squashes, requiring hefty quantities of butter and brown sugar to make it exciting. But the past two years we’ve been growing a new type of acorn squash that is supposed to put those bland old acorns to shame, with an intensely sweet flavor more like a delicata. It’s tiny, it’s golden, it’s Gill’s Golden Pippin. And because winter squash is always amazing when paired with peppers, I paired the sweet acorn with one of our sweetest pepper varieties, the pimento. Not only do we still have pimentos when it’s almost November, but they are still tasting as good as they did in the middle of August. 20161029_183524

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 2 shallots, chopped fine
    • 2 Gill’s Golden Pippin Acorn Squash, sliced thin
    • 4 Pimento peppers, sliced thin
    • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely (Beene Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Slice off the ends off your acorn squash and then slice them in half. Scoop out the seeds, and slice lengthwise once more so that you have quarters. Make thin slices down the quarters and set aside.
    • Slice your pimento peppers in half and rip out the seeds and stem. Make thin slices down each pepper half and set aside as well.
    • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the sliced pimentos and let cook covered about 3-5 minutes.
    • Add the acorn squash, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
    • Remove the lid and cook another 3-5 minutes until at desired softness. Add more salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!

 

October 8th Market Recipes ft. Hakurei Turnips

This Saturday was one of my favorite markets of the season. It was a perfect autumnal Oregon day, complete with a misty morning and a beautiful sunny afternoon. Tis the season of cool days and warm sautés. This week I’m throwing in some photos of our market booth at the end of the recipes, everything was just too beautiful not to share. Happy cooking everyone! img_2948-2

  • Kohlrabi, raw (June 4th post)
  • Watermelon Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Black Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Hakurei Turnip: Raw & Tamari Stir Fry
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéed

RECIPES:

  • Hakurei Turnip Tamari Stir Fry
    • For those of you who had the luxury of tasting these sweet treats in the spring, the rumors are true, Hakurei turnips are back in season. Raw, these turnips are soft and sweet and pure with fall magic. They can be eaten like an apple, added to a salad, or my favorite- used as a vehicle for dip. If you can stop munching them raw for a moment and use them in a stir fry, they are extremely satiating. There is no reason to not utilize the entire plant in the stir fry- the roots, stems, and leaves are all delicious and add to the meal.img_2947-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 2 bunches Hakurei Turnips
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head Garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive Oil
      • Tamari
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic and set both aside.
      • Remove the tails and tops from the Hakurei turnips, cut them in half, and then slice them thin.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in 3-5 Tbsp of tamari and let cook another minute, allowing the tamari to reduce ever so slightly.
      • Add in your Hakurei turnips and the garlic at this point. Adding garlic later in the cooking process preserves its flavor, which you definitely want when you’ve spent the time to peel and mince. Let cook about 3 minutes.
      • Roughly chop the turnip greens and stems and add them into the sauté. Add another splash of tamari  and a pinch or two of salt and let cook 1-2 minutes.
      • Turn off the pan and add more salt and tamari to taste if needed. Serve as is or over rice.
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
    • This amazing dish can only be enjoyed in a small window of time when we still have summer peppers hanging on despite winter squash encroaching on our market shelves. It was a favorite last year at market and continues to be one of mine, as the smoky poblano flavor compliments the creamy sweet delicata so well.
    • INGREDIENTS:img_2958-2
      • 1 Delicata squash, sliced into half-moons
      • 3-4 Poblano peppers, sliced thinly
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Cut the ends off your delicata squash to make a flat surface, then stand it on end and slice it in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to remove the seeds. Make thin half-moon slices down the delicata. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the sliced delicata and let cook covered about 4-6 minutes.
      • Chop the poblanos in half and rip out the seeds and stem (make sure to wash your hands after touching the spicy seeds). Chop each half into thin slices.
      • Add the poblanos, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
      • Let cook a couple more minutes to desired softness. Add more salt to taste, and enjoy! Customers last year said this dish was a hit at Thanksgiving.
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéedimg_2954-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 1 head Broccoli, broken into pieces
      • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
      • 2-3 Carrots, sliced into discs
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the broccoli and romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
      • Slice up a few carrots just to add some color to the green sauté. Add them into pan along with garlic and 1-2 pinches salt. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the broccoli and romanesco are cooked but still have some crunch.
      • Enjoy!

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Potato Varieties from left to right: Mountain Rose, Nicola, Rose Apple Finn Red Fingerlings, Purple Majesty, French Yellow Fingerlings

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Corvallis Market Recipes from May 14th

Happy Sunday!

A big thanks to all who were able to brave the rain and visit us at one of our markets yesterday. It was lovely to be the one standing next to the cook stove, I stayed toasty all day. Here is what we sampled up:

  • Raw Hakurei Salad Turnips (May 1st post)
  • Raw Red Radishes
  • Daikon Radish Stir Fry (May 1st post)
  • Wilted Chicory Salad

RAW RED RADISHES:

We served these raw, as they pack the most punch this way. Contrasted with the soft and sweet Hakurei turnip, these tiny pink bombs are crunchy with a sweet yet powerful spice. They’re great as a fresh, spicy snack, or sliced up into a salad.

Don’t forget about your radish greens! They come free with every bunch. Though these greens are fairly hairy, they become very tender and delicious when cooked. When sautéed they end up just like any other mild mustard green, such as mizuna or bekana mustard.

WILTED CHICORY SALAD:

Chicory greens can be an acquired taste. Not everyone enjoys the flavor of bitter, and up until about a year ago, I was one of those people. If I did ever eat bitter greens, I had to make myself do it, telling myself how good they were. They really are extraordinarily good for you, as the compounds that make the bitter flavor aid in healthier digestion. My taste buds acclimated to the new flavor, and now I actually crave these bitter leaves on a regular basis. So even if you haven’t liked them in the past, don’t give up! I had no idea what I was missing out on.IMG_2258 (2) half pixels

  • ½ Willamette Sweet Onion, chopped
  • ½ head Fresh Spring Garlic, minced
  • 1 head Frisee Endive, chopped including stems
  • 1 bunch Dandelion Greens, chopped including stems
  • Olive oil
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Salt

Directions:

  1. Coat the bottom of the pan with olive oil and bring up to medium temp. Add in the Willamette sweet onion and fresh spring garlic. Sauté for 5 minutes, quasi-caramelizing the onions. Add in about 3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar and saute for another 5 minutes. This sweet, savory, tangy base is IMG_2292 (2)what you want to balance out the bitterness.
  2. Add in the chopped endive, and stir around until it cooks down half way, about a minute.
  3. Then you’ll have room in the pan to add in the chopped dandelion greens. Sprinkle 2-3 pinches of salt and stir around for another minute or two, just until the greens look wilted.
  4. Turn off the stove. Let finish of cooking then taste. Add more balsamic and salt to taste.

 

CSA 2011 – Week 17: More on Storing Vegetables!

It’s hard to believe, but melons are gone and squash is here! There will most likely be a winter squash in each box for the rest of the season. Provided below is more information on storing and keeping vegetables. These are storing tips from Johnny’s Seed catalog.

Vegetables that last…

1-2 months: Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, parsley, turnips, winter squash (acorn and delicata).
2-4 months: Leeks, pumpkins, radishes, winter squash (buttercup, hubbard, kabocha, and Spaghetti).
4 months plus: Beets, cabbage, carrots, celeriac, garlic, Jerusalem artichoke, onions, parsnips, dried hot peppers, potatoes, rutabagas, butternut squash.

Temperature and humidity play a big role in a vegetable’s ability to store. Here are some tips on how these vegetables store best below:

Cold and Humid: Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celeriac, leeks, parsley, radishes, rutabagas, and turnips.
Cool and Humid: Potatoes.
Cold and Dry: Garlic and Onions (this is why these are best stored when dry in a paper bag, or a bag with holes; not plastic).
Cool and Dry: Pumpkins, winter squash.

Winter Squash Information:
Acorn: Last up to 3 months
Spaghetti Squash: Lasts up to 3 months
Delicata and similar types: Stores up to 4 months
Buttercup: Sweeter after storing for a few weeks; keeps up to 4 months
Kabocha: Gets sweeter when stored for a few weeks; green varieties keep from 4-5 months. Grey varieties will keep up to 6 months.
Butternut and Hubbard: Best a few weeks after harvest; will store up to 6 months.
All Squash stores best if it’s stem is still intact.

Squash Towels! Have any old towels laying around the house that need a new home? Bring them down to GTF! We are at the brink of a wonderful squash washing season and are in need of old towel donations for drying them. We’ll gladly take them off your hands!

What’s in the Box?

1.5 lb Potatoes (nicola)– Steam, roast, fry, mash; you can do just about anything with these!

Carrots, bunched – Shred them on salad, sauté in butter with salt, or eat plain.

2 onions (wallas)– Caramelize, eat raw sliced thin on sandwiches, or add to a slaw or potato salad.

1 bunch of scallions– Chop raw for salad, mix chopped green tops with cheese or eggs.

2 delicata squash– Roast with olive oil and salt, add onions, scallions, or even chopped peppers if you’d like.

1 bunch of red kale– Sauté in butter or olive oil and salt. (See recipe)

2 colored peppers- Grill, roast, or just eat raw; they are sweet.

1 bag baby onions – Cut them into quarters and add to vegetable roasts or sautés.

1 Cauliflower or Romanesco– Roast with olive oil and salt, top with cheese and scallions.

Red oak, cardinal, red Leaf, or green leaf lettuce- Make a salad, or add to sandwiches. Use to make lettuce wraps.

Tomatoes (approximately 2 lbs) – Chop raw on salad or sandwiches.

Roasted Cauliflower with cheese
1 large head or 2 small heads of cauliflower or Romanesco, cut into quarter size or larger pieces.
4 tablespoons of melted butter
Handful of baby onions(6 or so), cut in half and then sliced into quarters
1/2 cup of shredded parmesan cheese
1/4 cup finely chopped green onion tops
Pinch of salt
1 cup of sourdough or whole grain bread crumbs (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Mix the cauliflower, onions, scallion tops, butter and salt together. Place in a baking pan or dish and in the oven for about 20 minutes or until the cauliflower is mostly cooked but not brown yet. Add the shredded cheese on top and continue roasting until the cheese melts and starts to bubble and turn a light shade of brown. Add the bread crumbs in with the cheese if you want bread crumbs. This dish is versatile and a variety of seasonings can be used in it, such as chile flakes, chopped peppers, tomatoes, or even parsley. Mix it up! Try new things!

Roasted Delicata Squash
Cut the squash in half. Remove the seeds (you can save these seeds and roast them for eating or dry them for planting). Cut the squash up into 1/2 inch pieces. Place in a baking pan or casserole dish with olive oil, some pieces of butter and salt. Bake at 400 degrees for about 30 minutes, checking the squash and mixing it every 10 minutes or so. For a crispier, more caramelized flavor turn the oven on broil for about 3-5 minutes at the end. Keep a close eye on it, the squash will brown fast. I like to eat the skins of the delicata, they are not tough and have a good flavor. Try seasonings with minced garlic if you want! But it’s wonderful plain as well.

Dan the Man’s Red Kale Specialty
1 bunch red kale
1 tablespoon soy sauce
Pinch of cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 c rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1/3 c extra virgin olive oil

Cut the leaves of the kale off where they end. You can remove the stem part if it’s too thick for your liking. Chiffonade (cut very thinly) the leaves and combine all the ingredients into one bowl. Mix thoroughly and serve. You can let it sit for 15-20 minutes before serving if you like, the kale will seem more cooked if you do. Dan says this recipe is a great way to eat any type of kale and the two acids in the recipe are what actually cook the kale. It is also great leftover the next day, the kale is tender as if it had been lightly cooked. Adjust the ingredients to your liking. If you like more soy sauce and less rice vinegar try that, or add some raw minced garlic if you want.

Enjoy!