October 22nd Market Recipes ft. Savory Sunchokes

Sunchokes, also known as Jerusalem Artichokes, are a commonly overlooked vegetable. Sure, they look like knobby wrinkled potatoes, but there is so much more to them than meets the eye. The sunchoke plant looks like a towering sunflower, anchored into the soil by a huge tangle of root. Once you’ve dug up this large root, washed all the dirt out of the crevices, and cut it into manageable pieces, the savory artichoke-like flavor of the sunchoke can finally be appreciated. I was getting over a cold and refrained from sampling yesterday, but one of our wonderful marketeers, Logan cooked up the following delicious dishes including an excellent sunchoke stir fry.

  • Raw Black and Watermelon Radishes (October 8th post)
  • Spinach Salad with Shallot Balsamic Dressing
  • Stir Fried Sunchokes with Sesame Oil
  • Delicata Squash with Green Kaleimg_3055-2

SPINACH SALAD WITH SHALLOT BALSAMIC DRESSING:

  • Ingredients:
    • 2 bu. Spinach
    • 1 Shallot, minced
    • ~6 Tbsp Olive Oil
    • ~4 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
    • Salt to taste, ~2-3 pinches
  • Directions:
    • Mince a shallot and place into a bowl.
    • Add olive oil and balsamic vinegar to the bowl and use the back of a spoon to smash the shallot in the juices. This will release the garlic flavor of the shallot into the dressing, and you’ll instantly be able to smell the resulting fragrance explosion.
    • Add in a few pinches of salt and let sit while you chop up your spinach.
    • Toss the spinach in the dressing, and if needed add more salt, vinegar, or oil to taste. Though it can be served right away, letting the vinegar soften the spinach for ten to fifteen minutes before serving can really accentuate the deliciousness!img_3062-2
    • Excellent paired with the stir fried sunchokes.

STIR FRIED SUNCHOKES WITH SESAME OIL:

  • Ingredients:
    • 1 Shallot, finely chopped
    • 4-5 Sunchokes, finely chopped
    • 2-3 Tbsp Olive Oil
    • 1 Tbsp Sesame Oil
    • Salt
    • Parsley, Cilantro, or your herb of choice
  • Directions:
    • Finely chop your shallot and set aside.
    • Cut the sunchokes into even slices by first cutting them in half lengthwise, then cut each half lengthwise again. Finally, make thin slices all the way down your sunchoke pieces.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in your sunchokes and stir around. Cover and let cook about five minutes. Sunchokes have a strong crunch to them, so you’ll want to make sure to cook them thoroughly so that they become soft.
    • Add in the sesame oil and salt and let cook another five to ten minutes until soft to the taste.
    • Mince up some fresh herbs and sprinkle on top before serving.

DELICATA SQUASH WITH GREEN KALE:img_3061-2

  • Ingredients:
    • 1 Shallot, finely chopped
    • 1/2 head Garlic, finely chopped
    • 1 Delicata squash, chopped into half moons
    • 1/2 bunch Green Kale, finely chopped
    • 2-3 Tbsp Olive Oil
    • Salt
  • Directions:
    • Finely chop your shallot and set aside.
    • Delicata squash have a very high sugar content, and their skin is so tender that it doesn’t require peeling. Cut the top and bottom ends off the squash and stand up on end so you can slice it in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds with a spoon and then cut each half in half lengthwise again. Make thin slices all the way down each squash quarter, so that you make little moon shapes.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the delicata squash and stir around to coat in oil. Cover and let cook about eight minutes.
    • Finely chop garlic and green kale and add into the pan, along with a few pinches of salt and a splash of oil if needed. Let cook about three minutes covered.
    • Remove the lid and let cook another few minutes until the squash is tender to the taste. Add more salt if needed.

Happy cooking!

img_3050-2

2016 CSA – Week 9: Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie

CSA Week 9 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – week 9


Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie Mobile

One of the things that I love about farming is the constant need for innovation. Challenges arise on a daily basis and it takes creativity and ingenuity to move forward — constant problem solving.

Farmer John Eveland has had a longstanding innovation challenge that came to fruition last week with the inaugural trip of the GTF Mobile Veggie Truck. John hopes that this truck will help the farm bring veggies to folks in under-served areas without regular access to fresh, organic produce.

Since acquiring a retired bottled water truck a few years ago, John has been working away at retrofitting the truck as a veggie mobile. This meant installing pop up awnings, custom built in pop out displays, oh and giving the retired truck’s engine a bit of a tune up!

It has certainly been a shared project as our agronomist took on the task of fabricating the awnings, a local carpenter designed and built the pop out displays, and two local artists painted a beautiful mural on the back.

It is really fun to see that after many years of farming, there are always new, exciting things on the horizon.

Have a wonderful week!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐ Green Cabbage ($4.50)

1 Colored Bell Pepper ($2.00) – Grill or broil pepper halves. Let cool and remove skin. Use to make in salads, eggs, on sandwiches, or make romesco.

☐ 2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75)

1 Dried Red Onion ($0.75)

1 Sweet Italian Pepper ($1.00) – Eat fresh in salads, grill, or sauté. Substitute in any recipe calling for bell peppers.

☐ 2 Jimmy Nardello Peppers ($1.25) – Great for sautéing or frying, see recipe.

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

½ lb Spinach ($4.50)

☐ 4 Zucchini ($3.50)

¾ lbs Green Beans ($3.00) – Blanch or sauté plain or season with bacon, garlic, butter, lemon juice, or make garlic and ginger string beans (see recipe).

2 Tomatoes (~1 lb) ($3.00)

1 Pint Cherry Tomatoes ($3.50)

Box Market Value: $36.50

 

Recipes

Beyond the Bell Pepper: Jimmy Nardello Sweet Italian Frying Pepper

This variety was brought to the US in the late 1800’s by an Italian family and was grown by them for almost 100 years. The seed was donated to the seed savers exchange in 1983, before Jimmy Nardello passed away at the age of 81.

The Jimmy Nardello pepper has a characteristic scrunch towards the stem and has thinner flesh than the more common bell peppers. This thin flesh lends itself well to frying rather than roasting as with bell type sweet peppers.

Fried Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  1. Slice peppers in half lengthwise (removing seeds optional)
  2. Heat olive oil in a frying pan on medium-low heat
  3. Add the peppers to the frying pan stirring constantly until the skins are blistered and the peppers are slightly wilted, 6-8 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and serve.

Serving Suggestions:

  • Sauté with garlic (add at the end of cooking) and/or other herbs such as parsley.
  • Pairs well with a soft cheese such as goat chèvre, fresh mozzarella, burrata.
  • Also delicious served on top of steak.

 

String Beans with Ginger and Garlic

Sometimes a very simple recipe is the best way to enjoy such high quality, fresh food. This NYT cooking recipe is simple and delicious. If you’re not inspired by garlic and ginger, use the bean preparation technique and season your beans with something else to your liking. This recipe can easily be adjusted to a larger quantity of beans.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pounds string beans (French-style slim haricots verts work especially well), trimmed
  • 1 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger (about 2 inches ginger root, peeled)
  • 1 medium-size garlic clove, minced

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and fill a large bowl with ice water. Boil beans until just tender but still crisp and bright green. Start testing after 4 minutes or so, being careful not to overcook. When done, plunge beans into ice water to stop cooking, lift out immediately when cool and drain on towels. (Recipe can be made to this point up to a day in advance and kept refrigerated, wrapped in towels.)
  2. When ready to cook, heat oil in a wide skillet over high heat. Add beans, ginger and garlic, and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until beans are heated through and ginger and garlic are softened and aromatic. Sprinkle with salt, and remove to a serving dish.

Read More: NYT Cooking

 

Dinner Menu for July 7-9, 2016

Antipasti

bread-olives   4.5

-duck rillette   5.5

-duck liver mousse  5.5

-pork pâté  5.5  all three 9.5

chicken polpetti/tomato sauce/parm  6.5

marinated eggplant salad/bread  6.5

blue cheese tarte  6.5

bruschetta/duck liver/beets   6.5

GTF salad-beets/almond/blue cheese  7.5

gazpacho  soup  5

curried carrot  soup  5

Pizze Rosse

garlic/basil/tomato/mozzarella    9.5

duck/anchovy/mozz  10.5

ham/onion/capers/mozz  10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

egg/bacon/blue/mozz  10.5

tomato/zukes/olives/mozz 10.5

mushroom/scallion/mozz   10.5

 

-add an egg, anchovies, pickled jalapeno

for  2.

 

Secondi          (three course meal $29)

duck breast/carrot/spinach/blue berries  18.5

GTF chicken legs/polenta/carrots/peas/baby onions/parsley & lemon  17 .5

hanger  steak/roast potato/kale/pepper aioli* 19.5

albacore tuna/tomato/radicchio/patty pan/zuke/lemon vin/pesto  19.5

stuffed peppers/brown rice/tomato/black kale   16.5

 

To Finish

chocolate and coffee mousse cake*/coffee and chocolate anglaise   6.5

marionberry tart/marionberries/almond ice cream  6.5

strawberry ice cream baked Alaska/almond  6.5

2016 CSA – Week 3: Succession Planting

CSA Box

CSA Newsletter – Week 3


Succession Planting – extending the harvest

While storage crops such as beets, parsnips, and winter squash, can be harvested at one time and sold gradually, berries or tomatoes can be frozen; many of our crops must be harvested right before being sold. Each Monday and Friday, first thing in the morning, the barn crew goes out into the fields to harvest head lettuce to be sold to restaurants, at market, and to go into your CSA boxes. In order to have a constant supply of mature lettuce each week, we plan for successive plantings of lettuce.

Starting in February and continuing through August, a lettuce planting is seeded every week in the greenhouse, 27 plantings in all. Each planting consists of around 80 flats of romaine, butter, oak and little gem head lettuces as well as specialized varieties for the salad mix. That equates to around 13,000 lettuce plants per week! This weekly planting cycle starts a reoccurring cycle of tasks: thinning of newly germinated plants, transplanting of lettuce once the plants have reached the proper maturity, and then finally, harvest of the mature lettuce heads.  As we harvest the plantings each week, we make room in the fields for other crops to be planted, and the cycle continues.

Enjoy your lettuce and the rest of the veggies in your box!

– Lily Walton, CSA Coordinator

We’d love to see what you’re doing with your CSA box! Share your photos with us on Facebook and Instagram (@gatheringtogetherfarm) and #gtfcsa or send me an email and I’d be happy to share them.

 

Table of Box Contents:

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Red Potatoes ($4.50) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

Spinach ($3.00) Eat fresh in salads or sauté

Scallions ($2.00)Great in green salads, eggs, and on the grill!

Bunch Carrots ($3.50) Remove tops for storage. Eat them fresh, roast them, or add them to stir fry.

3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads

2 zucchini ($2.00) cut into 2 inch pieces and sauté with onions, garlic, or both

2 Dried Sweet Onions ($3.00)

Fresh Dill ($2.00) Add to potato salad, salad dressing, and even savory scones

Sugarloaf Chicory ($3.00) Try it fresh! See the recipes

1 Tomato ($2.50)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $30.50

 

Love the Loaf

Sugar Loaf chicory, or pan di Zucchero in Italian, is one of my favorite greens. Yes, you can braise it or sauté it, but if I’m not drizzling it with balsamic and olive oil and throwing it on the grill, I’m eating it in a salad. If you’ve eaten our salad mix, chances are you’ve eaten sugar loaf chicory raw too! Taste is a very individual sense, but I would encourage you to try chicories raw! Their texture and crunch is wonderful and their flavor is crisp and, yes, a tad bitter. Cut the bitterness with an acidic dressing using such things as lemon juice or balsamic vinegar (any vinegar for that matter).  Add elements of sweetness by putting fresh or dried fruit in your salad. If you’re still not convinced that eating raw chicory is for you, then definitely fire up the grill for a smoky, braised loaf.

 

Recipes:

Make your own Vinaigrette Salad Dressing

The possibilities are endless with salad dressing! I like to make the dressing in the same bowl that I am serving the salad in, before I add the greens.

The basic ratio is 3:1, oil to acid (vinegar, lemon juice, etc)

Preparation
In a bowl, add a pinch of salt to the acid and whisk to dissolve

  • (Optional) add an emulsifier such as Dijon mustard, egg or egg yolk, crushed garlic, or mayonnaise
  • Slowly add the oil while whisking until the dressing reaches the desired flavor and consistency
  • (Optional) Add flavor elements such as fresh herbs, minced or thinly sliced onion or shallots, etc

I like let some ingredients such as onions, carrots, or radishes marinate in the dressing before I toss the salad. In the case of chicories, I would toss the salad and let it marinate for a few minutes before eating.

Learn more about dressings and how to make them:

Cooks Illustrated Make Ahead Vinaigrette

Epicurious Homemade salad dressing recipes and tips

 

Cucumber Potato Salad

 Make use of your potatoes, dill, cucumber and onions with this potato salad recipe adapted from Sunset Magazine. Thinly sliced scallions would be a great addition to the salad or they could replace the onion all together.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds small red potatoes
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped fresh dill
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups slivered red onion, rinsed and patted dry
  • 1 cucumber, very thinly sliced

Preparation

1. Bring 1 in. water to a boil in a saucepan. Set whole potatoes in a steamer basket and steam in pan, covered, until tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Cool in ice water, then pat dry.

2. Whisk yogurt, mayonnaise, dill, vinegar, salt, and pepper in a small bowl to combine.

3. Quarter potatoes and put in a large bowl. Add onion, cucumber, and half the dressing; gently stir to coat. Add more dressing if you like, or save to use as a dip.

Make ahead: Up to 2 days through step 2. Chill potatoes a dressing separately and slice cucumber just before serving.

June 25th Market Recipes – Spinach Basil Salad and Fresh Pico de Gallo

Summer is officially here, and with it has come another slew of seasonal produce. It’s now that time of year when a few quick chops is all that stands between you and a meal of simple fresh food. The following recipes focus on quick raw dishes that can be enjoyed without turning on the stove, although I did break down and cook up some zucchini, I just missed it so much all winter.

  • Fresh Cucumber with Lemon and Salt20160622_090504 (2) 700 pixels wide
  • Fresh Kohlrabi with Lemon and Salt (June 4th post)
  • Cocozelle Squash Sauté with Black Kale and Garlic
  • Spinach Basil Salad
  • Pico de Gallo

FRESH CUCUMBER WITH LEMON AND SALT:

Cucumber season is in full swing! Eat them whole like an apple, slice them up with lemon and salt, mince them into a salad- cucumbers are good for everything.

COCOZELLE SQUASH SAUTE WITH BLACK KALE AND GARLIC:20160625_104941 (2)

Summer squash and garlic are soul mates, and when they are together, deliciousness is sure to result. Many people asked me, “One head of garlic? You must mean 1 clove?” No sir, no ma’am, I mean one head! Though garlic is most commonly treated as a seasoning, I prefer to treat it as a vegetable as it provides a savory flavor that makes vegetarian dishes feel especially filling. Feel free to add as much as or as little as you wish! I used Cocozelle in this dish, a type of zucchini that has thicker skin which helps the squash maintain its form without getting mushy in the pan.

  • 3 Cocozelle Summer Squash, sliced into discs
  • 1/2 Willamette Sweet Onion, finely chopped
  • 1 head Garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch Lacinato Black Kale, roughly chopped
  • Olive oil
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Coat the bottom of the pan in olive oil and bring it up to medium-high heat.
  2. Once up to temperature, add in the chopped onion and cook for 2 minutes.
  3. Add in sliced squash and garlic, stirring around to coat everything in oil. Sauté for about 7 minutes.
  4. Stir in the black kale and add a couple pinches of salt. Sauté for about 3 minutes. Timing is somewhat key here, as we don’t want the squash to get mushy. Make sure to add in the kale while the squash is still a little bit raw so that both the kale and the squash finish cooking about the same time in the pan.
  5. My favorite way to eat this dish is for breakfast topped with two fried eggs and some hot sauce. However it is also delicious along side rice and chicken, or just by itself.

SPINACH BASIL SALAD:20160625_104933 (2)

Spinach is not the biggest fan of hot weather, so I made this dish in an effort to enjoy it in its prime before we all have to go a month or two without its tender greens in our lives.

  • 1 bunch Spinach, roughly chopped
  • 2/3 bunch Basil, finely chopped
  • ~6 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • ~4 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/4 Willamette Sweet Onion, minced
  • Salt to taste, 2-3 pinches

Directions:

  1. Mince the garlic and onion and place them in a medium bowl.
  2. Pour the olive oil, salt, and balsamic vinegar into the bowl, and mash the onion and garlic into the dressing a bit with the back of a spoon. This is the magic secret! All those onion and garlic juices will release into your dressing making it incredibly flavorful.
  3. Chop up the spinach and basil and toss them in the dressing.
  4. This salad is delicious as is, although if you let it sit 10-15 minutes before serving, the vinegar will break down the spinach a bit making for an extremely tender salad.

PICO DE GALLO:20160625_115024 (2)

Pico de Gallo is one of my main dinners during the summer. All you have to do is roughly chop up the following ingredients, dump them all in a bowl, and mix them around. Serve with tortilla chips, on top of tacos, or if you’re crazy like me, grab a spoon and experience just how fresh summer can taste. You’ll notice from this picture that I like my pico with heavy quantities of onion; for those of you who prefer less onion, feel free to add less.

  • 4 medium Tomatoes
  • 1 medium-large Willamette Sweet Onion
  • 2-3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 bunch Cilantro
  • 1/3 bunch Basil
  • Lemon Juice to taste
  • Salt to taste