2016 CSA: Thank You, Thank You

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CSA Newsletter – Week 21


Thank You, Thank You

Throughout the year, there are certain events that are indicators that remind us of the changing seasons. The end of the CSA is certainly one of them. It marks the beginning of the season winding down. In a month, many markets will be ending and things will start to get a little quieter around the farm. Then, before you know it, we start the cycle all over again!

We hope that you have enjoyed your CSA experience this year. We certainly appreciate your support! While we do have diversified sales avenues, the CSA remains a vital part of our farm model. Your support in the early months of the year when we are working hard to prepare for the growing season is very integral to our success. As an individual, your contribution may seem small but when there are 330 shares, that amounts to a lot of support!

On our end, we do our best to give you a taste of our seasonal offerings and to share the bounty of our harvest. Our way of saying thank you for investing in our farm is by loading you up with veggies throughout the season. This year, the market value of your CSA veggies was about 35% over what you paid for your share.

Thank you for your support and we hope that you’ll join us again!

 

Table of Box Contents

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Butternut Squash ($3.00) – Butternut squash is incredibly versatile and delicious. The skin is thin enough that you can eat cooled or peal it easily before cooking. Roast it, use it for pie, add it to soup, the possibilities are endless!

☐  1 Pie Pumpkin ($4.00) – This pumpkin is cute to look at and is tatsy to eat too. Roast it and make a pie, or use it in soup or curry. If you have leftovers when you cook it, freeze for later use this winter.

☐  White Kale ($3.00)

  1 Celeriac ($2.50) – You are now acquainted with this gnarly fall veggie. Roast it, mash it, add it to soup. Try the Root Ribbons with Sage recipe.

☐  Bulk Carrots ($2.00)

☐  2 Parsnips ($2.00) – Parsnips are deliciously sweet when sautéed or roasted. Use them to make home fries, pureed soup, or mashed.

☐  Parsley ($2.00) – Parsley is a great addition or garnish to almost any dish. Add it to salad, soups, pesto, or salad dressings. Not going to use it all? Dry it for later use!

☐  1 Shallot ($1.50)

  2 Storage Onions ($1.50) – These onions are not as sweet raw but are delicious when cooked and they can last a very long time when stored in a dry, dark area.

Box Market Value: $25.00

 

Recipes

Butternut Squash and Kale Torte

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • ½ small butternut squash (about 1 lb)
  • 1 medium red onion
  • 1 small bunch kale
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • 1 medium Yukon gold potato (about 6 oz)
  • 6 oz. thinly sliced provolone cheese (from the deli counter)
  • 1 plum tomato
  • ¼ c. grated Parmesan (1 oz)

Preparation

Heat oven to 425°F. Oil a 9-in. springform pan. Arrange half the butternut squash in the bottom of the pan, in concentric circles. Top with half the onion, separating the rings. Top with half the kale, drizzle with half the oil and season with 1/4 tsp salt. Top with the potatoes and half the provolone cheese.

Top with remaining kale, drizzle with the remaining oil and season with 1/4 tsp each salt and pepper. Top with the remaining onion, tomatoes and provolone. Arrange the remaining squash on top and sprinkle with the Parmesan.

Jerry Traunfeld’s Root Ribbons with Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds medium root vegetables, such as carrots, parsnips, celeriac, rutabagas, turnips, parsley root, or salsify (avoid beets)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped sage
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

 Preparation

Wash and peel the roots and discard the peelings. Continue to peel the vegetables from their tops to the root tips to produce ribbons, rotating the roots on their axis a quarter turn after each strip is peeled, until you’re left with cores that are too small to work with. (You can snack on these or save them for stock.) Alternately, you may use a mandoline.

Melt the butter with the sage in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir for a minute to partially cook the sage. Add the root ribbons and toss them with tongs until they begin to wilt. Add the salt, a good grinding of black pepper, the maple syrup, lemon juice, and about 3/4 cup of water.

 

Butternut Squash Fries

As you probably know by now, I believe that anything is more delicious in fry form. Squash is now exception. Try making parsnip fries too. For a great dipping sauce, make herbed aioli with your fresh herbs.

 Ingredients

  • 1 butternut squash
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • sea salt to garnish

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 400° F. Peel and cut the squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds and then cut each half into fries or wedges.

Toss the fries in oil and then place in a single layer onto a baking tray. Bake for 20-35 minutes (depending on the size of your fries) turning once.

Remove from the oven and sprinkle with sea salt.

2016 CSA – Week 1: Greetings from the Farmers

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CSA Newsletter  – Week 1


Greetings from the Farmers

Thank you for joining us in our 19th CSA season! Last week, I saw the first heirloom tomato in the barn – a sure sign of the summer bounty that is yet to come. Your contribution as a CSA member provided a much needed kick start to our off-season allowing us to do such things as purchase seed and graft tomatoes months before the first harvest. The next 21 weeks is our way of saying thank you for your support.

Thank you to those who were able to contribute to the scholarship fund. This year we were able to make it possible for two local families take part in our CSA program.

The CSA newsletter is a way for me to share a little bit about the contents of each box, keep you up to date on farm happenings, and share ideas about ways to prepare your weekly supply of veggies. We would also love to hear from you! Share your favorite recipes or preparation methods, pictures, or questions. If you are social media savvy, you can find us on Facebook and Instagram at @gatheringtogetheringfarm and hashtag your pictures and comments with #gtfcsa so that we can find you! I will be sure to share tips, recipes, and questions in future newsletters.

Thanks so much everyone. Happy first week!

– Lily Walton, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents:

☐ Lettuce ($2.00) Store greens in mesh bag (or paper towel) inside plastic bag or container in fridge.

☐ 1½ lbs New Potatoes ($4.50) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

☐ Red Kale ($3.00) Separate the stems from the leaves by holding base of the stem and sliding your the other hand along the stem towards the tip of the leaf. Reserve the stems for sautéing or for adding flavor to soups or stews.

☐ 2-3 Zucchini ($4.00) Great on the grill or sautéed with garlic and onions.

☐ Bunch Carrots ($3.50) Remove tops for storage. Eat them fresh, roast them, or add them to stir fry.

☐ 3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads.

☐ 2 Storage Onions ($2.00)

☐ Fresh Thyme ($2.00)

☐ 1 Siletz Tomato ($2.50)

☐ 1 head cabbage ($4.00)

Box value at the farmers’ market: $31.00

 

Recipes:

The Versatility of Kale

Kale has become quite a popular vegetable touted for its nutritional value and cancer fighting properties. However I love kale because of its taste and versatility. It can be eaten raw, blanched, sautéed, you name it.

For a decadent raw kale salad, try this recipe from The Pioneer Woman. The vinegar in the dressing helps to break down the hardy kale leaves.


Killer Kale Salad

4 slices thin bacon, cut into bits

1 tablespoon butter

1 whole medium red onion, halved And sliced

8 ounces, weight white mushrooms, sliced

1/2 cup white wine

Salt And pepper, to taste

4 ounces goat cheese crumbled

3/4 cups olive oil

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

1 bunch kale

  • Fry the bacon bits until slightly crisp. Drain on a paper towel.
  • Pour out most of the grease and add the butter to the skillet. Add the onions and cook them over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until soft. Remove them to a plate. Add the mushrooms, stir, then add the wine, and salt and pepper. Turn the heat to medium-high and cook the mushrooms for several minutes, until most of the wine has evaporated and the mushrooms are soft. Remove them from the heat and set them aside.
  • Add the olive oil, vinegar, thyme, salt, and pepper to a mason jar and shake it to combine.
  • Remove the kale leaves from the stalks, then roll them up in batches and slice very thinly. Place the kale in a bowl. Add half the dressing and toss. Then add mushrooms, onions, and bacon and toss again. Finally, add the goat cheese and more dressing if needed, and toss. (Reserve extra dressing for another use.)

Oven Roasted Veggies, with or without Chicken

If the weather outside is any indication (at least in Philomath), maybe it isn’t quite summer yet. This box is perfect for roasted veggies – onions, carrots, potatoes, and season with olive oil, salt, fresh thyme and any other herbs that you have around. If you’re a meat eater, roast the veggies with bone in chicken thighs.

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 450 ° F
  • Cut onions, carrots, potatoes, and any other root veggies that you may have into evenly sized pieces. If potatoes are small, leave them whole
  • Toss with a few pinches of salt, thyme (oregano and parsley if you have it), and 3 tablespoons (or more) of olive oil
  • Place veggies in baking dish or a cast iron pan
  • Blot dry chicken thighs, brush with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and pepper
  • Place chicken on top of roasted veggies and bake for 40-45 minutes until the skin is crispy and browned and the vegetables are tender.