Lunch Menu: Week of Sept. 24, 2019

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and champagne vinaigrette  7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, pepitas, and basil vinaigrette  9-

Plate of farm pickled vegetables  6-

Chevre tartine with grapes, honey, hazelnuts and lemon zest  8-

Radicchio salad with shaved apples, fennel, shallots, mint yogurt and mozzarella  9-

Sourdough bread with butter and Newport sea salt  6-

Tiger eye bean soup with charred radicchio, pecorino, and grilled bread  6-

Entrees      

Plate of grilled summer vegetables with mole verde and toasted pepitas  15-

Fettuccine pasta with summer vegetable ragout, pecorino romano and breadcrumbs  16- 

Seared albacore tuna with romesco, poached potatoes, sweet peppers, onions, grilled corn and fresh herbs  23-

Grilled GTF chicken with olive oil fried potatoes, roasted peppers, pickled onions and aji verde sauce  20-

Sandwiches 

Community Cow beef pastrami on rye with farm sauerkraut, emmentaler cheese and thousand island*  13-

Community Cow beef burger on a brioche bun with aged white cheddar , sweet onions, tomato, butter lettuce and garlic aioli  13-

Grilled summer vegetables and herbs with whipped chevre on grilled flatbread  12-

Wood-Fired Pizzas

Pizza Bianca with fresh herbs  13-

Pizza Margherita  13-        

Fennel sausage, anaheim peppers, red onion, GTF tomato sauce, and mozzarella  15-   

Basil pesto, fresh tomato, shishito peppers, and pecorino  14-

Roasted delicata squash ,cherry tomato, zucchini, and gruyere  14-

Lunch Menu: Sept. 17-20, 2019

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and champagne vinaigrette  7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, pepitas, and basil vinaigrette  9-

Plate of farm pickled vegetables  6-

GTF chicken liver mousse with pickled grapes, stone ground mustard and crostini  10-

Radicchio salad with shaved apples, fennel, shallots, mint yogurt and mozzarella  9-

Sourdough bread with butter and Newport sea salt  6-

Red bean, tomato, and kale soup with toasted bread  6-

Entrees      

Plate of grilled summer vegetables with mole verde and toasted pepitas  15- 

Potato gnocchi with summer vegetable ragout and fresh herbs  17- 

Seared albacore tuna with romesco, poached potatoes, sweet peppers, onions, grilled corn and fresh herbs  23-

Grilled GTF chicken with olive oil fried potatoes, roasted peppers, pickled onions and aji verde sauce  20-

Sandwiches 

Community Cow beef pastrami on rye with farm sauerkraut, emmentaler cheese and thousand island*  13-

Community Cow beef burger on a brioche bun with aged white cheddar , sweet onions, tomato, butter lettuce and garlic aioli  13-

Grilled summer vegetables and herbs with whipped chevre on grilled flatbread  12-

Wood-Fired Pizzas

Pizza Bianca with fresh herbs  13-

Pizza Margherita  13-        

Fennel sausage, sweet peppers, shallot, GTF tomato sauce, and mozzarella  15-   

Basil pesto, cherry tomatoes, shishito peppers, and feta  14-

Roasted potatoes, fresh tomato, red onion, and blue cheese  14-

Lunch Menu: Week of September 10, 2019

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and champagne vinaigrette  7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, pepitas, and basil vinaigrette  9-

Plate of farm pickled vegetables  6-

GTF chicken liver mousse with a frisee and pear salad, dijon mustard and toast  10-

Tomato and melon salad with goat’s milk feta, radicchio, and maple-sherry vinegar  9-

Spicy salmon pate with cucumbers and dill on sourdough bread  10-

Sourdough bread with butter and Newport sea salt  6-

Melon gazpacho with smoky spiced yogurt, basil and cilantro  6-

Entrees      

Plate of grilled summer vegetables with mole verde and toasted papitas  15- 

Fettuccine pasta with basil pesto, fresh tomatoes, zucchini, shishito peppers, and alsea acres chevre  17- 

Seared albacore tuna with romesco, poached potatoes, sweet peppers, onions, grilled corn and fresh herbs  23-

Grilled GTF chicken with smoked summer vegetable succotash and chicken jus  20-

Sandwiches 

Community Cow beef pastrami on rye with farm sauerkraut, emmentaler cheese and thousand island*  13-

Community Cow beef burger on a brioche bun with aged white cheddar , sweet onions, tomato, butter lettuce and garlic aioli  13-

Grilled summer vegetables and herbs with whipped chevre on grilled flatbread  12-

Wood-Fired Pizzas

Pizza Bianca with fresh herbs  13-

Pizza Margherita  13-        

Sage sausage, roasted potatoes, onions, tomato sauce, and fontina  15-   

Basil pesto, cherry tomatoes, shishito pepper, and chevre  14-

Summer squash, roasted peppers, sweet onions, and Rogue River bleu cheese  14-

Lunch Menu: Week of September 3, 2019

Salads & Small Plates

Simple salad and champagne vinaigrette 7-

Mixed green salad with summer vegetables, pepitas, and basil vinaigrette 9-

Plate of farm pickled vegetables  6-

GTF chicken liver mousse with a strawberry-tomatillo mostarda, dressed greens and toast 10-

Tomato and melon salad with goat’s milk feta, radicchio, and maple-balsamic vinegar 9-

Spicy salmon pate with cucumbers and dill on sourdough bread 10-

Sourdough bread with olive oil, balsamic, and basil 6-

Tomato gazpacho with olive oil and basil 6-

Entrees      

Plate of grilled summer vegetables with romesco and toasted hazelnuts 15- 

Fettuccine pasta with basil pesto, fresh tomatoes, zucchini, shishito peppers, and alsea acres chevre 17- 

Seared Oregon albacore with eggplant puree, couscous, green beans, sweet peppers and cherry tomatoes 23-

Grilled GTF chicken with smoked summer vegetable succotash and chicken jus 20-

Sandwiches 

Community Cow beef pastrami on rye with farm sauerkraut, emmentaler cheese and thousand island*  13-

Community Cow beef burger on a brioche bun with aged white cheddar , sweet onions, tomato, butter lettuce and garlic aioli 13-

Grilled summer vegetables and herbs with whipped chevre on grilled flatbread 12-

Wood-Fired Pizzas

Pizza Bianca with fresh herbs 13-

Pizza Margherita 13-        

Fennel sausage, shaved fennel, tomato sauce, mozzarella and anchovies 15-   

Basil pesto, cherry tomatoes, roasted corn, olives and chevre 14-

Summer squash, roasted peppers, sweet onions, and gruyere 14-

The Life of a GTF Tomato

  • Seed Selection—there are thousands of tomato varieties in this world, and we need the tomatoes that grow well and sell in this area. Joelene spends countless hours meeting with seed company representatives and other farmers talking about which varieties they think are best. Then she has to use her twenty years of growing experience on GTF land to choose what’s best for us, taking into consideration what sells well at markets and wholesale.
  • Seed Timing & Grafting—We seed tomatoes about every other week from January through April. We have to have successions of dozens of different varieties of tomatoes, some in hoop houses, some outside. Plus nearly all of our tomatoes destined for hoop houses must be grafted, so we have to match the timing of rootstock and scion tomatoes which grow at different rates but must have the same stem girth at the time of grafting.
  • Flat Preparation—We make our own propagation soil mix for all the transplants we grow. To do that we have to make our own compost (a very complex piece of the puzzle), and then sift it all by hand, mixing it in a cement mixer with peat moss, perlite or pumice, and our own special mixture of micro ingredients and mycorrhizal fungi. The greenhouse crew makes soil nearly all day twice a week about January—April.
    • Tomato Seeding—We seed all of our tomatoes by hand, and the flats sit on hot tables to improve germination. For grafted tomatoes, twice the number of plants must be seeded.
    • The Grafting Chamber—After many years, Joelene has finished our grafting chamber to be a deluxe resort where tomatoes can form graft unions, a place where they can have just the right amount of light, heat, and moisture. Two people graft two to three days a week for at least two months. This takes precision razor cuts, sanitation, steady hands, and many years of practice.
    • Up-potting—After the tomatoes have sealed their grafts and the graft clip pops off, it’s time to up-pot all the seedlings into larger pots, which the tomatoes grow up in for another couple weeks.
    • Succession Planning & Disease Rotation—We graft nearly all the tomatoes destined for hoop houses. This is because we don’t have quite enough houses to rotate our hot weather crops as much as we’d like, so there is more disease build up in that soil. Many of the diseases that inflict tomatoes are soil born, so that’s why we graft disease-resistant rootstock with heirloom tomato scion material. We have more land outside of hoop houses and can do a better disease rotation, so grafting isn’t as important for outdoor tomatoes.
  • House Preparation
    • Install snow protection in the winter so we don’t lose any houses to snow. Remove them in the spring.
    • Soil testing—Check for all the macro and micro nutrients, add fertility and other various amendments. It’s actually quite a bit more complicated than that, especially including mid-growth applications.
    • Till the ground and form the beds.
    • Lay out drip tape and hook up irrigation, including trench digging, pressure calculations and pipe repairs.
    • Lay plastic over the drip tape and cover edges with soil to hold in place.
    • Sterilize trellising wires and install in the houses.
  • Tomato Transplanting—All the up-potted tomatoes must be loaded onto flatbed trucks and driven out to their planting destination. For many of the things we grow we use a partially mechanized transplanting method (tractor attachments that allow people to either sit or lay down while they plant), but all of our tomatoes get transplanted by hand. It’s a whole lot of bending over, at first in the cold and muddy spring, and later in the blistering hot summer.
  • Tomato Trellising—We have metal hooks with twine hanging down from the greenhouse ceiling. The strings are attached to the tomato plants planted below, and the plants grow up the strings as the season progresses.
  • Tomato Pruning—We prune nearly all of our indeterminate tomatoes to have two main leaders, one to twine around each string hanging down from the trellis. For about ten weeks out of the year a four-person crew works about three full days a week pruning and trellising tomatoes. Trellising entails twining the new tomato growth around the strings as the plants grow. Pruning involves careful pinching and clipping of branches and suckers. Anyone who’s spent much time pruning tomatoes knows the feeling of having green sticky tomato gunk all over your arms and hair and face. We prune largely to decrease disease pressure allowing more air flow through the houses.
  • Greenhouse Shading—In the summer months it can get way too hot inside a long hoop house, so we have to provide the plants some shade. If we had all the dollars we would just buy shade cloth, but we don’t , so we have designed a mud cannon to shoot mud all over the outside of our greenhouses, thus shading our tomato plants. Before the cannon was invented, it took a crew of four people standing (barely) on the back of a flatbed throwing mud up onto the houses one Nancy’s yogurt scoop at a time while driving forward in a jerky fashion.
  • Weeding—This is the one thing that doesn’t take too much time with tomatoes, as they are planted in plastic mulch. The plastic we use is a special plastic designed to prevent weed germination, but also designed to allow lots of heat to come through. This extra heat on the root system is what really drives up our yields.
  • Pest & Disease Monitoring—The plants have to be constantly monitored to see how they’re doing, see if we need to address any pest or disease issues, or if we need to apply mud or go through and do another prune. This is a duty shared by many who are at the farm all the time. We all watch and observe and share our concerns.
  • Tomato Irrigation—Irrigation is a very delicate dance. Water too much and you get disease and dilute fruit; water too little and you’ll have stunted plants and decreased yields. And those are but a few of the problems that can arise from improper irrigation. Joelene lives at the farm and gets up with the sun every day. She spends her entire day turning water on and off all around the farm until it’s dark out, and it’s light out for a long time in the summer! She has to use decades of knowledge about farming to decide which crops need what, taking into account what the weather’s been doing for the past few weeks and what it’s projected to do. Only so much water can be drawn from individual pumps at a time, so crops have to be prioritized, and a huge mental map must exist.
  • Tomato Harvest—Our field crew of about fifteen people harvests tomatoes nearly every day for almost four months straight. It’s a lot harder than it sounds to judge when a tomato is at the perfect time to pick, especially because every variety is different, every microclimate is different, every hoop house is different, and all of our eyes are different. You don’t want it too ripe or else it won’t make it to market, but you don’t want it so green that it won’t finish ripening. And aside from that, the simple mechanics of getting your body into a greenhouse packed with tomato plants taller than you, while holding a flat of thirty pounds of tomatoes while it’s crazy humid and reaching 90 degrees outside—that’s difficult.
  • Tomato Grading—Once in the packing shed, all of our tomatoes get graded by a crew of 2-3 people. Every single tomato gets picked up, felt, looked at, and put back down into its final destination. Tomato grading takes a trained eye and hand, and is broken down into the following categories:
    • Grocery Store Order—get packed into nice boxes and delivered all over Corvallis and Portland.
    • Restaurant Order—get packed into nice boxes and delivered all over Corvallis and Portland.
    • Farmers’ Markets—get packed into yellow flats and sent to markets.
    • #2’s—get sold discounted by the box or get roasted by our food processing crew and used in our salsa, in our restaurant (pizza sauce) and sold wholesale to other restaurants.
    • Compost—another place where the whole cycle begins again.
  • Heirloom Tomatoes—Heirlooms are so huge and delicate that they have to be cradled to stay protected. When harvested, we put them in foam-lined yellow flats in a single layer, so they take up a lot of space on pallets.
  • Marketing Tomatoes—Every year the giant selection of tomato varieties we grow changes to match changes in growing conditions and market demand. This information has to get compiled by our office and given out to our marketeers and our customers, which takes a good deal of time as well.
  • Cleaning Tomato Houses—At the end of the season we have to remove all of the dead tomato plants from the trellis strings. The plants get loaded onto a flatbed and get taken to our compost pile. The strings must be cleaned of all plant material, wrapped up in an organized fashion, and unhooked from the greenhouse ceiling. Then all the plastic must be carefully pulled out of the soil and thrown away. The drip tape must be gathered together and moved out of the way for the winter, and then the whole cycle starts over again.

Though tomatoes are one of our most labor-intensive crops to produce, many of the things we grow take nearly as much work and time, such as leeks and strawberries.

This blog post was written by Laura Bennett.