Tag Archives: tomatoes

2016 CSA – Week 9: Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie

CSA Week 9 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – week 9


Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie Mobile

One of the things that I love about farming is the constant need for innovation. Challenges arise on a daily basis and it takes creativity and ingenuity to move forward — constant problem solving.

Farmer John Eveland has had a longstanding innovation challenge that came to fruition last week with the inaugural trip of the GTF Mobile Veggie Truck. John hopes that this truck will help the farm bring veggies to folks in under-served areas without regular access to fresh, organic produce.

Since acquiring a retired bottled water truck a few years ago, John has been working away at retrofitting the truck as a veggie mobile. This meant installing pop up awnings, custom built in pop out displays, oh and giving the retired truck’s engine a bit of a tune up!

It has certainly been a shared project as our agronomist took on the task of fabricating the awnings, a local carpenter designed and built the pop out displays, and two local artists painted a beautiful mural on the back.

It is really fun to see that after many years of farming, there are always new, exciting things on the horizon.

Have a wonderful week!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐ Green Cabbage ($4.50)

1 Colored Bell Pepper ($2.00) – Grill or broil pepper halves. Let cool and remove skin. Use to make in salads, eggs, on sandwiches, or make romesco.

☐ 2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75)

1 Dried Red Onion ($0.75)

1 Sweet Italian Pepper ($1.00) – Eat fresh in salads, grill, or sauté. Substitute in any recipe calling for bell peppers.

☐ 2 Jimmy Nardello Peppers ($1.25) – Great for sautéing or frying, see recipe.

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

½ lb Spinach ($4.50)

☐ 4 Zucchini ($3.50)

¾ lbs Green Beans ($3.00) – Blanch or sauté plain or season with bacon, garlic, butter, lemon juice, or make garlic and ginger string beans (see recipe).

2 Tomatoes (~1 lb) ($3.00)

1 Pint Cherry Tomatoes ($3.50)

Box Market Value: $36.50

 

Recipes

Beyond the Bell Pepper: Jimmy Nardello Sweet Italian Frying Pepper

This variety was brought to the US in the late 1800’s by an Italian family and was grown by them for almost 100 years. The seed was donated to the seed savers exchange in 1983, before Jimmy Nardello passed away at the age of 81.

The Jimmy Nardello pepper has a characteristic scrunch towards the stem and has thinner flesh than the more common bell peppers. This thin flesh lends itself well to frying rather than roasting as with bell type sweet peppers.

Fried Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  1. Slice peppers in half lengthwise (removing seeds optional)
  2. Heat olive oil in a frying pan on medium-low heat
  3. Add the peppers to the frying pan stirring constantly until the skins are blistered and the peppers are slightly wilted, 6-8 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and serve.

Serving Suggestions:

  • Sauté with garlic (add at the end of cooking) and/or other herbs such as parsley.
  • Pairs well with a soft cheese such as goat chèvre, fresh mozzarella, burrata.
  • Also delicious served on top of steak.

 

String Beans with Ginger and Garlic

Sometimes a very simple recipe is the best way to enjoy such high quality, fresh food. This NYT cooking recipe is simple and delicious. If you’re not inspired by garlic and ginger, use the bean preparation technique and season your beans with something else to your liking. This recipe can easily be adjusted to a larger quantity of beans.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pounds string beans (French-style slim haricots verts work especially well), trimmed
  • 1 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger (about 2 inches ginger root, peeled)
  • 1 medium-size garlic clove, minced

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and fill a large bowl with ice water. Boil beans until just tender but still crisp and bright green. Start testing after 4 minutes or so, being careful not to overcook. When done, plunge beans into ice water to stop cooking, lift out immediately when cool and drain on towels. (Recipe can be made to this point up to a day in advance and kept refrigerated, wrapped in towels.)
  2. When ready to cook, heat oil in a wide skillet over high heat. Add beans, ginger and garlic, and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until beans are heated through and ginger and garlic are softened and aromatic. Sprinkle with salt, and remove to a serving dish.

Read More: NYT Cooking

 

2016 CSA – Week 6: Mechanical Cultivation

CSA Week 6 Graphic

CSA Newsletter  – Week 6


Mechanical Cultivation: Keeping our fields well groomed

In passing, our logistics coordinator and cultivator extraordinaire, Joey, was lamenting about not wanting to get back on the tractor to cultivate in the afternoon. I don’t blame him, long days spent in the hot sun; meticulously driving through row after row of crops is tedious and straining.  However, cultivation is a very essential part of our weed management program and can make or break the success of a crop.

This time of year, we have a dedicated crew of cultivators who spend much of their days riding classic International and Farmall cultivation tractors,  from the 50’s and 60’s, through fields, the walking the fine line of effective cultivation and uprooting the very plants we are trying to protect. Like so many things in farming, timing is everything. If a crop (or the weeds) grows too large, the cultivation implement may not be able to run through the crop safely. Alternatively, if a crop is too small when cultivated, the plants may get buried in the processes, adversely impacting their success.  With new crops being planted weekly, there is never a shortage of things to cultivate. Often, the limiting factor is hours in the day.

Anything that does not get cultivated by tractor gets cultivated and weeded by hand. Our skilled field crew can knock out a weedy planting pretty quick if it’s all hands on deck, but with much of the harvest coming on, hand weeding often takes a back seat to harvesting mature crops ready for sale.

So thank you to the cultivation crew for taking one for the team and keeping our fields looking beautiful and weed free (reduced)!

Have a great week and enjoy those veggies.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

¾ Lbs Green Beans ($3.00)

Bunched Red Shallots ($2.50) – Delicious in eggs, salad, or grilled

2 Fresh Sweet Onion ($3.00)

1 Eggplant ($4.50) – Best eaten soon after harvest. Delicious roasted or charred, in dips, ragu, or as eggplant parmesan.

Bunch Carrots ($3.50) – Remove tops for storage

Fresh Dill ($2.00)

Green Bell Pepper ($1.50)

Dried Garlic ($1.50)

2-3 Summer Squash ($3.00) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread.

3 Cucumbers ($3.00)

1 lb Tomatoes (2-3) ($3.50)

Box Market Value: $35.25

 

Recipes

Lisa’s Turkish Eggplant Dish

 Lisa, a dear friend of the farm and former CSA Coordinator, is also a wonderful cook. I remembered tasting her eggplant dip when she made it last year and I am so excited to share it with you this week (and to have the recipe for myself)!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 eggplant
  • 1 (plus a bit) tablespoons butter
  • 1-2 cloves garlic (depending on size)
  • 1/3 to 2/3 cup yogurt
  • salt to taste

PREPARATION

  1. Place whole eggplant on grill (even straight on the coals)or in very hot oven until black. Let cool.
  2. Lightly sauté garlic in butter not allowing it to turn brown or black.
  3. Peel eggplant and chop into chunks.
  4. Add eggplant to garlic butter mixture and cook on medium low for about 5 minutes.
  5. Add yogurt and salt to taste.


Seasoned Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise is one of my favorite condiments for grilled or roasted vegetables. It is incredibly versatile and can be dressed up in endless ways. Make your own mayo or use the jar from the fridge. Don’t be shy, a little mayo never hurt anybody and you’ll be surprised at how delicious it tastes!

Flavors (try combinations too!):

  • Roasted garlic (raw too!)
  • Sriracha
  • Mustard
  • Fresh Herbs: basil, parsley, dill, etc.
  • Chipotle
  • Harissa: a Tunisian hot chili pepper paste
  • Dry spices: curry powder, paprika, etc.

Ratatouille

This very versatile dish is perfect for using up the abundant zucchini and tomatoes, at this time of year. Add dried or fresh hot pepper to taste. Eat this dish with fresh bread, over rice or pasta, or all by itself.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large globe eggplant, peeled, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large zucchini, sliced into ¼-inch-thick rounds
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more
  • ¾ cup olive oil, divided
  • 5 sprigs thyme
  • 1 large onion, halved, sliced ½ inch thick
  • 1 red bell pepper, ribs and seeds removed, coarsely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 pints cherry tomatoes divided (or use 2-3 whole tomatoes)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup torn basil leaves

PREPARATION

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Toss eggplant, zucchini, and 2 tsp. salt in a colander. Let sit 30 minutes, then pat dry with paper towels.
  2. Heat ¼ cup oil in a large Dutch oven or other heavy ovenproof pot over medium-high. Add half of eggplant and zucchini and cook, stirring constantly, until vegetables begin to take on color, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl. Repeat with ¼ cup oil and remaining eggplant and zucchini.
  3. Tie thyme sprigs together with kitchen twine. Heat remaining ¼ cup oil in same pot and cook onion, bell pepper, garlic, and thyme, stirring occasionally, until onion is beginning to brown and is softened, 8–10 minutes.
  4. Add half of tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until just beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in zucchini and eggplant, then top with remaining 1 pint tomatoes (do not stir); season with salt and pepper. Transfer pot to oven and roast until all vegetables are softened and tomatoes have begun to burst, 15–20 minutes.
  5. Remove thyme bundle. Transfer to a serving platter and top with basil.

Read More: Bon Appétit

2016 CSA – Week 5: Cultivating a Tomato Forest

CSA Week 5 Graphic

CSA Newsletter  – Week 5


Cultivating a Tomato Forest

I was walking through one of the greenhouses a few days ago and couldn’t believe the size of our tomato plants. It was like walking through a tomato forest. Plants towering over my head and branches the circumference of a shovel handles. These tomatoes aren’t messing around!

The genesis of these tomatoes began in the early months of the year in our propagation house. When they are about the size of a toothpick, scion stems are meticulously grafted to separate rootstock plants. The seeding, grafting, and healing process of the tomato plants takes about 4 weeks of diligent care in the propagation house.

Once the tomatoes are planted in the high tunnels or in the field, they are “trained” by wrapping the leading stems with twine.  This supports the plants vegetation and fruit as they grow larger. Each week, the plants are pruned and shoots called suckers are removed.

In the high tunnels, the tomato plants can reach the high tunnel ceiling, up to 15 feet high. If the plants remain healthy throughout the season, fruit can be harvested up to the first hard frost, usually into November. That is some serious growing power!

Have a great week and enjoy those veggies.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

Red Scallions ($2.50) – Delicious in eggs, salad, or grilled

☐ Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

☐ Bunch Carrots ($3.50) – Remove tops for storage

Italian Parsley ($2.00) – Substitute for basil in your favorite pesto recipe or try this one from SimplyRecipes.

Radicchio ($3.00) – Delicious in salad or grilled. Pairs well with balsamic and an aged cheese such as parmesan.

Swiss Chard ($3.00) – Sauté with onions and eat with eggs or top over a grilled sausage.

Green Cabbage ($5.25) – Coleslaw is a wonderful summer salad. See recipe.

2-4 Zucchini ($3.25) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread.

4 Cucumbers ($4.00) – Try them smashed! See recipe.

1 lb Tomatoes (2-3) ($3.50)

 

Recipes

Smashed Cucumber Salad

Smashing cucumbers is fun and it makes a delicious salad! I made this last week and it was so tasty, and refreshing. Definitely a new summer staple for me! Use as few or as many cucumbers as you like and season to taste.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2-4 cucumbers
  • salt
  • Chili oil or toasted sesame oil
  • rice vinegar (optional)

Add-ons: toasted sesame seeds, scallions, garlic, red pepper flakes

PREPARATION

  1. Smash the cucumbers, one at a time, using a rolling pin. Smash on one side, flip, and smash on the other.
  2. Tear cucumbers into chunks, place in a colander, and salt. Let drain for 10 minutes.
  3. Drizzle with the oil and add any other additional flavorings to taste.

Watch this fun Bon Appetit video for a visual recipe.

 

Quinoa Tabbouleh

This twist on the classic Middle Eastern salad is delicious using quinoa but you can also use the traditional grain, bulger. This is one of those dishes that just taste better the longer the flavors meld so make a large batch and eat it all week!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup quinoa, rinsed well
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt plus more
  • 2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2/3 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint
  • Scallions, thinly sliced

PREPARATION

  1. Bring quinoa, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1 1/4 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat.
  2. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until quinoa is tender, about 10 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork.
  4. Meanwhile, whisk lemon juice and garlic in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Spread out quinoa on a large rimmed baking sheet; let cool. Transfer to a large bowl; mix in 1/4 cup dressing.
  6. Add cucumber, tomatoes, herbs, and scallions to bowl with quinoa; toss to coat. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Drizzle remaining dressing over.

Read More: Epicurious

 

Coleslaw with Mint and Golden Raisins

This is one of my go to salads. The mint is so fresh and the raisins add a hint of sweetness. Make a day ahead to let the raisins plum up and for the flavors to meld. Quantities are flexible depending on how you like your coleslaw. Season to taste.

INGREDIENTS

  • Green or Red Cabbage
  • Mayonnaise (or veganaise)
  • Fresh Mint
  • Golden Raisins

PREPARATION

  1. Chop Cabbage into long, thin strips. Chop mint.
  2. In a large bowl, mix cabbage, mint, and golden raisins.
  3. Add enough mayonnaise to coat. Enjoy!

2016 CSA – Week 4: Cooking with Recipes

CSA Week 4 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 4


Cooking with Recipes

I subscribe to cooking magazines and own several cookbooks and I love to read the recipes! However, when it comes to actually cooking, I almost never follow the recipe exactly. If I’m missing an ingredient, I’ll make a substitution or omit it all together. Or if there is something that I have in my fridge that I think would be a good addition to the dish, I’ll throw it in. To me, recipes are more of inspiration or reference rather than a formula. While this can be a risky approach when baking where ratios and ingredients can be critical, there is often a lot of room in for flexibility in recipes in cooking.

As a CSA member, your challenge each week is to utilize the contents of your box to make room for next week. There will be times when recipes you come across, even in the newsletter, call for ingredients that aren’t in your box. I encourage you to be flexible and adaptable. What recipe substitutions can you make to use your ingredients? Are there ingredients in your box that would be a great addition to a recipe that you found?

In the age of the internet, there are so many great digital resources for recipes and food preparation ideas. I have covered a few of my personal favorites in the recipe section.

Happy 4th of July and have a great week!

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

Napa Cabbage ($3.00)

great for stir fry, salad rolls, or coleslaw. See recipe!

Baby Red Onions ($2.50)

Chioggia Bunch Beets ($3.50) Remove greens and sauté or steam. Roast or steam beets. Great with balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre.

Cilantro ($2.00)

Jalapeno pepper ($0.50)

Broccoli ($1.75) Great fresh, sautéed, and in stir-fry

Fennel ($2.00) Use the bulb and fronds too. See recipe

3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads

2-4 zucchini ($3.25) try zucchini pancakes! See recipe.

3 Tomatoes ($4.50)

Box Market Value: $30.25

 

Digital Resources All about Food and Cooking

 Food 52

A site that started with a simple mission: talk about food! This site is a forum for what to cook, how to cook, and recipes too!

NewYorkTimes Cooking

Find cooking techniques, searchable recipes, and gorgeous pictures!

Bon Appétit

A food magazine that follows trends, chefs, and what’s in season. Visit Bon Appétit for trending food news and recipes!

Epicurious

Search their large database of recipes by ingredient or dish. And peruse their articles for ingredient tips and expert advice.

 

Recipes:

Thai Coleslaw with Mint and Cilantro

This fresh take on coleslaw comes to your from Christopher Kimball at Milk Street Kitchen. I made this last week and it was light and delicious. Make a large batch and eat it all week!

Coconut milk offers the right balance of richness and fresh flavor for this Napa cabbage-based coleslaw. Many vegetables worked well, but the combination of sweet sugar snap peas and crispy radishes tested best.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (add more to taste)
  • 1 medium serrano chili, seeded and minced
  • 5 tablespoons coconut milk (not light coconut milk)
  • 1 pound Napa cabbage (1 small head), thinly sliced crosswise (about 8 cups)
  • 6 radishes, trimmed, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces sugar snap peas, strings removed and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh mint
  • ½ cup roasted, salted cashews, coarsely chopped

Instructions

  1. In a liquid measuring cup, combine the lime juice, sugar, fish sauce and chili. Let sit for 10 minutes. Whisk in the coconut milk until combined.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, radishes, peas, cilantro and mint. Add the dressing and toss until evenly coated. Stir in the cashews and serve.

Read More: Milk Street Kitchen

 

Fennel Slaw with Mint Vinaigrette

The sugar helps bring out the natural sweetness of the fennel, don’t leave out!

Ingredients

  • 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 medium bulbs)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar (or honey)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 2 teaspoons minced shallot or onion

Make the vinaigrette: Put the lemon juice, shallot, mustard, salt, sugar and mint in a blender (or use whisk) and pulse briefly to combine. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil until it is well combined.

Shave the fennel into thin slices: Very thinly slice the fennel into 1/8 inch slices starting from the bottom of the bulb (use a mandolin if you have one). Chop some of the fennel fronds as well to toss in with the salad.

Marinate fennel with vinaigrette: Toss with the fennel and marinate for at least an hour. Serve this salad either cold or at room temperature.

Read More: Simplyrecipes.com

 

Zucchini Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups grated zucchini
  • 1/2 cup grated potato
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

 Instructions

  1. Grate zucchini and potato. Let drain in colander for at least 30 minutes. Salt generously.
  2. In a bowl, beat egg, chopped parsley, and lemon zest. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Roll and squeeze zucchini/potato mixture in a towel to soak up moisture.
  4. Combine zucchini / potato mixture with egg mixture. Mix well.
  5. Heat skillet on medium high heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter or olive oil. Drop a spoonful of mixture in pan. Pat with spatula to flatten as much as possible — it’ll be crispier that way.
  6. Cook 2 at a time until golden brown on each side. Serve as soon as possible, with a dollop of sour cream or yogurt on top.

Read More: Food52

 

Lunch Menu: Week of June 20, 2016

1699-web

composed salad

Antipasti

bread/olives  4.0

bread/ pesto  5.5

country pork pâté/mustard/cornichon  5.5

tomato/marinated mozzarella/basil  6.5

bruschetta/beef tongue/baby onion 6.5

ricotta sformato/grill zucchini/pesto   6.5

mixed field greens, balsamic vinaigrette  6.5

GTF salad  –  beet/blue/cuke  10.5

cold cucumber soup/bread  4

roasted pepper soup/ bread   4

Pizze Rosse

garlic/tomato/basil/mozz   9.5

bacon/blue/onion/mozz  10.5

bells/zukes/kale/mozz  10.5

 

Pizze Bianche

tomato/olives/mozz 10.5

ham/caper/egg/mozz 10.5

duck/anchovy/scallion/mozz  10.5

–add an egg, pickled jalapenos

or anchovies for  $1

1697-web

semolina gnocchi with braised pork shoulder and cavelo nero


Secondi:

spaghetti carbonara, pork belly, capers & blue cheese   10

semolina gnocchi with braised pork shoulder and cavelo nero  10

creamy polenta with soft farm egg*, zukes, tomato & balsamic reduction 10

savory bread pudding with carrot, tomato, baby onions, beet greens & basil pesto  10

composed salad of grilled tuna, tomatoes, potatoes, olives & aioli*   12.5


Dolce:

almond cream tarte w/ marionberries  5.5