October 29th Market Recipes ft. Romanesco

Our brassicas are loving this crisp autumn weather! The brassica family is home to many fall favorites, such as romanesco, kohlrabi, radishes, and cabbage. Sadly I wasn’t able to take pictures before our samples were gobbled up yesterday, so I’ve included some other market photos for your viewing pleasure. Here’s what we sampled up downtown in the cool sunshine:

  • Watermelon Radishes, raw (October 8th Post)img_2948-2
  • Black Radishes, raw (October 8th Post)
  • Romanesco with Leeks and Chard Stem
  • Gill’s Golden Pippin Acorn Squash with Pimento Peppers

Romanesco with Leeks and Chard Stem:

Romanesco, although commonly thought of as a type of cauliflower, is actually just as separate from cauliflower as broccoli is. The formation and placement of leaves and other plant parts is called Phylotaxy, a process driven by the famous Fibonacci Sequence. Romanesco may be one of the only plants where the bare bones of this complicated mathematical form is visible and available for appreciation by the human eye. If you can bring yourself to cut into this beauty, Romanesco has an amazing nutty, cauliflower-like flavor.14656421_1322301794446585_2603067765083979695_n

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 2 Leeks, sliced thin
    • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
    • 1 bunch Chard, stems only
    • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely (Beene Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
    • Slice your leeks thinly. The entire leek is edible, even the dark green part! They cook down just the same.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the leeks and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
    • Remove the stems from your chard leaves by slicing them out individually with your knife. Once you have a pile of bright stems, slice them thinly and add them into the pan.  Let cook another 3-5 minutes. I don’t like to crowd romanesco with leafy greens so that their beauty can be most appreciated, so the chard stem is a nice addition that adds some color without stealing the spotlight. But do make sure to save your greens and use them for some other delicious meal!
    • Finely chop the garlic and add it along with 1-2 pinches salt and pepper. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the romanesco is cooked but still has some crunch.
    • Enjoy!

Gill’s Golden Pippin Acorn Squash with Pimento Peppers:

Acorn squash is the one winter squash that I grew up eating, which is strange since it is notoriously the blander of the squashes, requiring hefty quantities of butter and brown sugar to make it exciting. But the past two years we’ve been growing a new type of acorn squash that is supposed to put those bland old acorns to shame, with an intensely sweet flavor more like a delicata. It’s tiny, it’s golden, it’s Gill’s Golden Pippin. And because winter squash is always amazing when paired with peppers, I paired the sweet acorn with one of our sweetest pepper varieties, the pimento. Not only do we still have pimentos when it’s almost November, but they are still tasting as good as they did in the middle of August. 20161029_183524

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 2 shallots, chopped fine
    • 2 Gill’s Golden Pippin Acorn Squash, sliced thin
    • 4 Pimento peppers, sliced thin
    • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely (Beene Farm)
    • Olive oil
    • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • DIRECTIONS:
    • Slice off the ends off your acorn squash and then slice them in half. Scoop out the seeds, and slice lengthwise once more so that you have quarters. Make thin slices down the quarters and set aside.
    • Slice your pimento peppers in half and rip out the seeds and stem. Make thin slices down each pepper half and set aside as well.
    • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
    • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
    • Add in the sliced pimentos and let cook covered about 3-5 minutes.
    • Add the acorn squash, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
    • Remove the lid and cook another 3-5 minutes until at desired softness. Add more salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!

 

2016 CSA – Week 20: From the Field to the Fridge

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CSA Newsletter – Week 20


From the Field to the Fridge

I have the pleasure of hosting a pickup each week in Corvallis. It is there that I get to see the fruits of our labor enjoyed by CSA members, their children, and even a few dogs! Last week, I was chatting with a member about how many vegetables are groomed during harvest or during packing on the farm. For some vegetables, there is quite a transformation from the field to your fridge.

Anything with a twist tie has been bunched in the field. That means that several plants, leaves, or stems are gathered together, sometimes from multiple plants or stalks, to make a bunch. Bunches must be uniform and consistent, it is certainly a skill. Bunches are comprised of the best vegetation from a planting, so no matter how the planting looks in the fields, the bunches will always look great!

Root crops such as beets, turnips, or rutabagas are trimmed in the field. The greens are left in the field along with any roots that are clearly not marketable. The resulting harvest is brought into the barn for washing and further grading.

In the barn, cabbages are peeled down to layers without holes or blemishes. Onions are peeled to check for quality. Leeks and scallions tops are trimmed or chopped.

All of this selection allows us to bring you the best of what we have to offer. Enjoy!

 

Table of Box Contents

  Lettuce ($2.00)

☐  1½ lbs Potatoes ($3.00)

☐  1 Crown Prince Squash ($6.50) – This beautiful blue squash is a great keeper and has dense, sweet orange flesh. Roast it and use it for pie, soup, or eat it as is.

☐  1 Black Radish ($1.00) – This striking radish is very versatile. It is a bit denser than a salad radish but can certainly be eaten fresh when sliced thin. Try adding it to gratins or roasting it, see recipe.

☐  1 Watermelon Radish ($1.00) – These radishes are a welcomed burst of color in the fall. Slice into the green and white radish to reveal a vibrant pink interior. Add some color to any salad, soup, or veggie roast.

  1 Cabbage ($6.25) – This cabbage will keep for several weeks (or longer) in your fridge and can become an ingredient in many meals. Try it stir-fried, in soups, salads, or stuffed.

  1 Kohlrabi ($1.25)

☐  1 Bunch Carrots ($3.50)

☐  Swiss Chard ($3.00)

  1 Red Onion ($0.75)

☐  2 Sweet Onions ($1.75) – Sweet onions don’t store as well as other varieties. They are delicious raw in salad, sautéed with greens, or in soup. 

 Box Market Value: $30.00

 

Recipes

Pumpkin Pie

 For the Crust

  • 3 cups raw pecans
  • 6 tbsp. light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 12 tsp. kosher salt
  • 6 tbsp. butter, cubed

For the Filling

  • 1 ¾ Cup roasted squash
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup 2% milk

Preheat oven to 350° with rack in the middle position. Pulse pecans, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in food processor until coarsely chopped. Add butter and pulse until mixture is finely ground and holds together like damp sand. Press most of the pecan mixture into deep dish 9″ pie plate, Bake 8–10 minutes until lightly colored and fragrant. Set aside until ready to fill.

In large bowl, combine the squash, eggs, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves; beat until smooth. (I like to use a food processor)  Gradually beat in milk. Pour into crust.

Bake at 350° for  50-60 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cover edges with foil during the last 30 minutes to prevent over-browning if necessary. Cool on a wire rack. Refrigerate leftovers.

Read More: Saveur for crust and TasteofHome for filling.

 

Roasted Radishes

Radishes are delicious raw in salads but they are also delicious cooked or roasted. Cooking tones down the spiciness so if you aren’t’ a fan of raw radishes, try them cooked!

Ingredients

  • 3 large watermelon radishes, peeled
  • 1 Black radish, peeled
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

Chèvre Horseradish Dressing

  • Fresh horseradish
  • Zest from 1/2 of a lemon
  • 1 ½ tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ cup chèvre
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400º.  Cover a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil, coat lightly with oil.

Cut radishes into 1/2-inch thick, even pieces. Toss radish pieces with olive oil, salt, and pepper in a large bowl to coat evenly. Distribute the radish pieces in an even layer on the baking sheet.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring after 15 minutes. Radishes should have some browning, and retain some firmness when they are done.

While radishes are roasting, grate about 2 to 3 packed tablespoons’ worth of fresh horseradish. Thoroughly combine 1 ½  tbsp of the grated horseradish with the lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, chèvre, and 1/8 tsp salt.

Once radishes have finished roasting, transfer them to the bowl with the dressing. Toss to coat. Taste and add salt if needed. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Read More: Food52

 

Kimchi-Style Sautéed Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 2 scallions, cut into ½” pieces, plus more, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 1” piece peeled ginger, chopped
  • 2 tbsp gochujang
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ½ head green cabbage, cut into 1” strips
  • Kosher salt

Preparation

Purée scallions, garlic, ginger, gochujang, fish sauce, and rice vinegar in a blender. Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Cook cabbage, tossing often, until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add scallion mixture and sliced scallions; season with salt.

Read More: BonAppetit

 

October 8th Market Recipes ft. Hakurei Turnips

This Saturday was one of my favorite markets of the season. It was a perfect autumnal Oregon day, complete with a misty morning and a beautiful sunny afternoon. Tis the season of cool days and warm sautés. This week I’m throwing in some photos of our market booth at the end of the recipes, everything was just too beautiful not to share. Happy cooking everyone! img_2948-2

  • Kohlrabi, raw (June 4th post)
  • Watermelon Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Black Radish, raw (right photo)
  • Hakurei Turnip: Raw & Tamari Stir Fry
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéed

RECIPES:

  • Hakurei Turnip Tamari Stir Fry
    • For those of you who had the luxury of tasting these sweet treats in the spring, the rumors are true, Hakurei turnips are back in season. Raw, these turnips are soft and sweet and pure with fall magic. They can be eaten like an apple, added to a salad, or my favorite- used as a vehicle for dip. If you can stop munching them raw for a moment and use them in a stir fry, they are extremely satiating. There is no reason to not utilize the entire plant in the stir fry- the roots, stems, and leaves are all delicious and add to the meal.img_2947-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 2 bunches Hakurei Turnips
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head Garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive Oil
      • Tamari
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic and set both aside.
      • Remove the tails and tops from the Hakurei turnips, cut them in half, and then slice them thin.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in 3-5 Tbsp of tamari and let cook another minute, allowing the tamari to reduce ever so slightly.
      • Add in your Hakurei turnips and the garlic at this point. Adding garlic later in the cooking process preserves its flavor, which you definitely want when you’ve spent the time to peel and mince. Let cook about 3 minutes.
      • Roughly chop the turnip greens and stems and add them into the sauté. Add another splash of tamari  and a pinch or two of salt and let cook 1-2 minutes.
      • Turn off the pan and add more salt and tamari to taste if needed. Serve as is or over rice.
  • Delicata Squash and Poblano Pepper, sautéed
    • This amazing dish can only be enjoyed in a small window of time when we still have summer peppers hanging on despite winter squash encroaching on our market shelves. It was a favorite last year at market and continues to be one of mine, as the smoky poblano flavor compliments the creamy sweet delicata so well.
    • INGREDIENTS:img_2958-2
      • 1 Delicata squash, sliced into half-moons
      • 3-4 Poblano peppers, sliced thinly
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Cut the ends off your delicata squash to make a flat surface, then stand it on end and slice it in half lengthwise. Use a spoon to remove the seeds. Make thin half-moon slices down the delicata. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the sliced delicata and let cook covered about 4-6 minutes.
      • Chop the poblanos in half and rip out the seeds and stem (make sure to wash your hands after touching the spicy seeds). Chop each half into thin slices.
      • Add the poblanos, garlic, and 1-2 pinches of salt to the pan and stir around. Cover and let cook about another 3-5 minutes.
      • Let cook a couple more minutes to desired softness. Add more salt to taste, and enjoy! Customers last year said this dish was a hit at Thanksgiving.
  • Broccoli and Romanesco, sautéedimg_2954-2
    • INGREDIENTS:
      • 1 head Broccoli, broken into pieces
      • 1 head Romanesco, broken into pieces
      • 2-3 Carrots, sliced into discs
      • 1-2 large shallots, chopped finely
      • 1/2 head garlic, chopped finely
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
    • DIRECTIONS:
      • Broccoli and Romanesco look and taste nicest in a sauté if you maintain their form throughout the cooking process. The shapes that we chop things into change their texture and flavor. So instead of “chopping” it, try to use your knife to cut off individual little trees. Set aside.
      • Finely chop the shallots and garlic.
      • Heat up your pan to medium-high with olive oil coating the bottom. Once up to temp, add in the shallots and let cook about 2 minutes.
      • Add in the broccoli and romanesco and let cook covered 3-5 minutes.
      • Slice up a few carrots just to add some color to the green sauté. Add them into pan along with garlic and 1-2 pinches salt. Let cook another 3-5 minutes uncovered until the broccoli and romanesco are cooked but still have some crunch.
      • Enjoy!

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Potato Varieties from left to right: Mountain Rose, Nicola, Rose Apple Finn Red Fingerlings, Purple Majesty, French Yellow Fingerlings

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