2016 CSA – Week 10: Onion Harvest…Waiting for the Flop

CSA Week 10 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 10


Onion Harvest: Waiting for the Flop

In early spring, we seeded about 800 flats of onions and shallots in the greenhouse (that’s over 19,000 onions!). These guys have spent the summer growing in the fields and now the tops are beginning to flop. This is an indication that they are done growing. Once the majority of the onions have flopped, they are pulled, by hand, from the ground and laid on the soil surface for a few days. This allows the roots to dry, decreasing the chance of rot
during storage.

The onions are then loaded onto trucks and transported from the field into greenhouses for curing. Curing allows the onion to dry and for a protective skin to form. We typically let them cure for at least one week, sometimes longer if we are busy harvesting other crops! Once the onions have
dried, the tops and roots are trimmed and they are placed in wooden crates for storage. If the crop is healthy and the storage conditions are right, these onions will last through the beginning of next year. You can never have too many onions in my book!

Have a great week.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

☐ Lettuce ($2.00)
☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)
☐ 1 Eggplant ($4.50) – See the recipes for a delicious eggplant sauce.
☐ 2 Colored Bell Peppers ($4.00) – Grill or broil and use in soups, sandwiches,
dips, or salad.
☐ 1 Red Cipollini onion ($1.00) – Cipollinis are lovely roasted or caramelized and can be used in any recipe calling for onion.
☐ 1 White Cipollini onion ($1.00)
☐ 2 Dried Sweet onions ($1.25) – Store in a cool, dry place.
☐ 1 Fennel Bulb ($2.00) – For fennel lovers, use the fronds as the greens in
your favorite pesto recipe.
☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)
☐ 2-3 Zucchini ($2.50)
☐ 1 lb Romano Beans ($4.00) – Substitute these beans for green beans in any
recipe. Delicious blanched or sautéed.
☐ 3 lbs Heirloom Tomatoes (3) ($12.00) – You can’t go wrong with these beautiful tomatoes. Sandwiches, caprese salad, pasta, or slice, salt, and eat with a knife and fork!
☐ 4 Ears of Corn ($4.00) – Picked by farmer John himself. Steam or grill
(with husk on) and eat with salt and butter. For a culinary adventure, make fresh polenta!

Box Market Value: $44.00

 

Recipes

Ottolenghi’s Eggplant Sauce

This recipe is adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s book Plenty. The full recipe includes making a fresh corn polenta which is topped with this sauce. However, the sauce sounded so good it seems that it would be delicious on just about anything! Check out the full recipe at Food 52.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 medium eggplant, cut into 3/4-inch dice
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • 1/4cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup chopped peeled tomatoes (fresh or canned)
  • 6 1/2tablespoons water
  • 1/4teaspoon salt
  • 1/4teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped oregano

Preparation

  1. Heat up the oil in a large saucepan and fry the eggplant on medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until nicely brown.
  2. Drain off as much oil as you can and discard it — the safest way to do this is to scoop out the eggplant to a plate using a slotted spoon, then pour off the oil into a bowl before added the eggplant back in. You can save the oil to fry lamb chops or eggs in tomorrow.
  3. Add the tomato paste to the pan and stir with the eggplant.
  4. Cook for 2 minutes, then add the wine and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add the chopped tomatoes, water, salt, sugar and oregano and cook for a further 5 minutes to get a deep-flavored sauce.
  6. Set aside; warm it up when needed.


Jalapeno Corn Fritters

This is not the type of thing that I would make regularly, but a good fritter sure is delicious! For a slightly lighter version, omit the bacon and cheese.

 Ingredients

  • 3 c. fresh corn
  • 2/3 c. cornmeal
  • 1/4 c. shredded Cheddar
  • 1/4 c. cream cheese
  • 2 scallions, sliced
  • 2 slices cooked bacon, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 jalapeño, finely diced
  • kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil or canola oil
  • Juice of 1 lime, divided
  • Sour cream, for serving

Preparation

  1. In a medium bowl, combine corn, cornmeal, cheddar, cream cheese, scallions, bacon, eggs, the juice of half a lime, and jalapeño.
  2. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper to taste. Using your hands, form the mixture into small patties.
  3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  4. Working in batches, fry the patties until they’re golden brown, about 3 to 4 minutes per sidee.

Read More: Delish

2016 CSA – Week 9: Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie

CSA Week 9 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – week 9


Expanding the Farm Fleet: The Veggie Mobile

One of the things that I love about farming is the constant need for innovation. Challenges arise on a daily basis and it takes creativity and ingenuity to move forward — constant problem solving.

Farmer John Eveland has had a longstanding innovation challenge that came to fruition last week with the inaugural trip of the GTF Mobile Veggie Truck. John hopes that this truck will help the farm bring veggies to folks in under-served areas without regular access to fresh, organic produce.

Since acquiring a retired bottled water truck a few years ago, John has been working away at retrofitting the truck as a veggie mobile. This meant installing pop up awnings, custom built in pop out displays, oh and giving the retired truck’s engine a bit of a tune up!

It has certainly been a shared project as our agronomist took on the task of fabricating the awnings, a local carpenter designed and built the pop out displays, and two local artists painted a beautiful mural on the back.

It is really fun to see that after many years of farming, there are always new, exciting things on the horizon.

Have a wonderful week!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25)

☐ Green Cabbage ($4.50)

1 Colored Bell Pepper ($2.00) – Grill or broil pepper halves. Let cool and remove skin. Use to make in salads, eggs, on sandwiches, or make romesco.

☐ 2 Dried Sweet Onions ($1.75)

1 Dried Red Onion ($0.75)

1 Sweet Italian Pepper ($1.00) – Eat fresh in salads, grill, or sauté. Substitute in any recipe calling for bell peppers.

☐ 2 Jimmy Nardello Peppers ($1.25) – Great for sautéing or frying, see recipe.

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

½ lb Spinach ($4.50)

☐ 4 Zucchini ($3.50)

¾ lbs Green Beans ($3.00) – Blanch or sauté plain or season with bacon, garlic, butter, lemon juice, or make garlic and ginger string beans (see recipe).

2 Tomatoes (~1 lb) ($3.00)

1 Pint Cherry Tomatoes ($3.50)

Box Market Value: $36.50

 

Recipes

Beyond the Bell Pepper: Jimmy Nardello Sweet Italian Frying Pepper

This variety was brought to the US in the late 1800’s by an Italian family and was grown by them for almost 100 years. The seed was donated to the seed savers exchange in 1983, before Jimmy Nardello passed away at the age of 81.

The Jimmy Nardello pepper has a characteristic scrunch towards the stem and has thinner flesh than the more common bell peppers. This thin flesh lends itself well to frying rather than roasting as with bell type sweet peppers.

Fried Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  1. Slice peppers in half lengthwise (removing seeds optional)
  2. Heat olive oil in a frying pan on medium-low heat
  3. Add the peppers to the frying pan stirring constantly until the skins are blistered and the peppers are slightly wilted, 6-8 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and serve.

Serving Suggestions:

  • Sauté with garlic (add at the end of cooking) and/or other herbs such as parsley.
  • Pairs well with a soft cheese such as goat chèvre, fresh mozzarella, burrata.
  • Also delicious served on top of steak.

 

String Beans with Ginger and Garlic

Sometimes a very simple recipe is the best way to enjoy such high quality, fresh food. This NYT cooking recipe is simple and delicious. If you’re not inspired by garlic and ginger, use the bean preparation technique and season your beans with something else to your liking. This recipe can easily be adjusted to a larger quantity of beans.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pounds string beans (French-style slim haricots verts work especially well), trimmed
  • 1 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger (about 2 inches ginger root, peeled)
  • 1 medium-size garlic clove, minced

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and fill a large bowl with ice water. Boil beans until just tender but still crisp and bright green. Start testing after 4 minutes or so, being careful not to overcook. When done, plunge beans into ice water to stop cooking, lift out immediately when cool and drain on towels. (Recipe can be made to this point up to a day in advance and kept refrigerated, wrapped in towels.)
  2. When ready to cook, heat oil in a wide skillet over high heat. Add beans, ginger and garlic, and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until beans are heated through and ginger and garlic are softened and aromatic. Sprinkle with salt, and remove to a serving dish.

Read More: NYT Cooking

 

2016 CSA – Week 8: The Value of Variety

CSA Week 8 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 8


The Value of Variety

A seemingly simple question was posed to me the other week: Why grow this yellow flying saucer squash when you can just grow a regular green zucchini? In the moment, I didn’t have a great answer, but the question got me thinking about the many reasons that variety and biodiversity are important to our farm system.

On a farm, there are so many factors and considerations that determine what we grow. Of course, we want to grow products that we can sell and that are tasty. Because we sell at a variety of markets, to chefs and restaurants, grocery stores, and directly to people like you, there is a wide variation of products, sizes desired within our broad market creating a diverse demand therefore, more variety means more possibilities of meeting people’s needs. Also, product diversity certainly makes our farmers market setups look beautiful and inviting!

On the farm, the seasons often dictate what we grow, and we can extend seasons by growing varieties that are early season, heat tolerant, overwintering, etc. Other on-farm considerations include days to maturity (how long it takes to grow), yield, ease of harvest, disease resistance, and storability.

In the case of the flying saucer squash, its fun shape and firm, nutty texture make it a squash we’ll continue to grow. With all of the complexities and variables in agriculture, sometimes it’s that simple!

Happy August and enjoy your salsa box!

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

☐ 1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) – Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

2 Poblano Peppers ($2.00) – Stuff as chile rellenos, or incorporate into a potato and corn hash

Bunched Golden Beets ($3.00)

☐ 1 Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

1 Red Torpedo Onion ($1.50) – The long, cylindrical shape of this onion lends itself well to slicing rounds for salad.

☐ 1 Jalapeno ($.50) – Add a little kick to your salsa or pico de gallo

☐ Bunched Carrots ($3.50)

Cilantro ($2.00) – Use in salad, salsa, or to garnish any dish

1 lb Tomatillos (4-6) ($3.00) – Roast them and make salsa verde

☐ 4 zucchini ($3.50) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread

2 Big Beef Tomatoes ($4.50)

4 Ears of Corn ($3.00) – Boil or grill and eat straight off the cob or cut off the ear and add to stir-fry or salsa

Box Market Value: $32.25

Recipes

Pico de Gallo

Make this simple, fresh salsa using your tomatoes, white onion, jalapeno, and cilantro.

The tomatoes will most likely be the limiting factor so chop those first and add chopped onions and cilantro to taste. Depending on your heat preference, add chopped jalapeno. Add a little salt and lime and adjust ingredients to taste.

Tomatillo Salsa

Ingredients

  • 5 medium tomatillos
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 serrano chiles (or jalapeno)
  • Handful chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • salt to taste

Preparation

  1. Peel and wash the tomatillos. Split and seed the chiles. Place the tomatillos and chiles under a broiler for about 4 minutes each side.
  2. Transfer the blackened tomatillos, chiles, and any juices from the pan to a blender or food processor. Simply add the rest of the ingredients and blend.
  3. This is the absolute basic recipe. Try adding garlic, cumin, avocado, and/or lime.

Poblano, Potato, and Corn Gratin

This dish is a bit indulgent but potatoes, corn, and poblanos are such a great combination, I couldn’t resist!  For a lighter version, cut the potatoes into chunks, salute with onions and olive oil for 10 minutes and then add the poblanos and corn. Sauté until ingredients are cooked through and add salt and pepper to taste.

 Ingredients

  •  3 teaspoons olive oil, divided
  • 2 large fresh poblano chiles, stemmed, seeded, cut into 2×1/4-inch strips
  • 1 1/4 pounds potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 cup cooked corn, cut off the cob
  • 1 cup coarsely grated Oaxaca cheese or whole-milk mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups half and half
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Rub 9 1/2-inch-diameter deep-dish glass pie dish or cast-iron skillet with 2 teaspoons oil. Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add poblano strips and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. Arrange 1/3 of potato rounds, overlapping slightly, in prepared pie dish. Sprinkle 1/3 of poblano strips over, then 1/3 of corn and 1/3 of cheese. Repeat with 1/3 of potatoes, 1/3 of poblanos, 1/3 of corn, and 1/3 of cheese. Top with remaining potatoes, poblanos, and corn, reserving remaining 1/3 of cheese. Place dish on rimmed baking sheet.
  3. Whisk half and half, flour, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper in small bowl. Pour over potato mixture in pie dish; press potatoes to submerge. Cover dish tightly with foil. Bake 30 minutes. Remove foil; sprinkle remaining cheese over gratin. Continue to bake gratin until potatoes are tender and cheese is golden brown, about 25 minutes longer. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

Read More: Bon Appétit

2016 CSA – Week 5: Cultivating a Tomato Forest

CSA Week 5 Graphic

CSA Newsletter  – Week 5


Cultivating a Tomato Forest

I was walking through one of the greenhouses a few days ago and couldn’t believe the size of our tomato plants. It was like walking through a tomato forest. Plants towering over my head and branches the circumference of a shovel handles. These tomatoes aren’t messing around!

The genesis of these tomatoes began in the early months of the year in our propagation house. When they are about the size of a toothpick, scion stems are meticulously grafted to separate rootstock plants. The seeding, grafting, and healing process of the tomato plants takes about 4 weeks of diligent care in the propagation house.

Once the tomatoes are planted in the high tunnels or in the field, they are “trained” by wrapping the leading stems with twine.  This supports the plants vegetation and fruit as they grow larger. Each week, the plants are pruned and shoots called suckers are removed.

In the high tunnels, the tomato plants can reach the high tunnel ceiling, up to 15 feet high. If the plants remain healthy throughout the season, fruit can be harvested up to the first hard frost, usually into November. That is some serious growing power!

Have a great week and enjoy those veggies.

-Lily, CSA Coordinator

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

Red Scallions ($2.50) – Delicious in eggs, salad, or grilled

☐ Fresh Sweet Onion ($1.50)

☐ Bunch Carrots ($3.50) – Remove tops for storage

Italian Parsley ($2.00) – Substitute for basil in your favorite pesto recipe or try this one from SimplyRecipes.

Radicchio ($3.00) – Delicious in salad or grilled. Pairs well with balsamic and an aged cheese such as parmesan.

Swiss Chard ($3.00) – Sauté with onions and eat with eggs or top over a grilled sausage.

Green Cabbage ($5.25) – Coleslaw is a wonderful summer salad. See recipe.

2-4 Zucchini ($3.25) – Grill, sauté, or make zucchini bread.

4 Cucumbers ($4.00) – Try them smashed! See recipe.

1 lb Tomatoes (2-3) ($3.50)

 

Recipes

Smashed Cucumber Salad

Smashing cucumbers is fun and it makes a delicious salad! I made this last week and it was so tasty, and refreshing. Definitely a new summer staple for me! Use as few or as many cucumbers as you like and season to taste.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2-4 cucumbers
  • salt
  • Chili oil or toasted sesame oil
  • rice vinegar (optional)

Add-ons: toasted sesame seeds, scallions, garlic, red pepper flakes

PREPARATION

  1. Smash the cucumbers, one at a time, using a rolling pin. Smash on one side, flip, and smash on the other.
  2. Tear cucumbers into chunks, place in a colander, and salt. Let drain for 10 minutes.
  3. Drizzle with the oil and add any other additional flavorings to taste.

Watch this fun Bon Appetit video for a visual recipe.

 

Quinoa Tabbouleh

This twist on the classic Middle Eastern salad is delicious using quinoa but you can also use the traditional grain, bulger. This is one of those dishes that just taste better the longer the flavors meld so make a large batch and eat it all week!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup quinoa, rinsed well
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt plus more
  • 2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2/3 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint
  • Scallions, thinly sliced

PREPARATION

  1. Bring quinoa, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1 1/4 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat.
  2. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until quinoa is tender, about 10 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork.
  4. Meanwhile, whisk lemon juice and garlic in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Spread out quinoa on a large rimmed baking sheet; let cool. Transfer to a large bowl; mix in 1/4 cup dressing.
  6. Add cucumber, tomatoes, herbs, and scallions to bowl with quinoa; toss to coat. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Drizzle remaining dressing over.

Read More: Epicurious

 

Coleslaw with Mint and Golden Raisins

This is one of my go to salads. The mint is so fresh and the raisins add a hint of sweetness. Make a day ahead to let the raisins plum up and for the flavors to meld. Quantities are flexible depending on how you like your coleslaw. Season to taste.

INGREDIENTS

  • Green or Red Cabbage
  • Mayonnaise (or veganaise)
  • Fresh Mint
  • Golden Raisins

PREPARATION

  1. Chop Cabbage into long, thin strips. Chop mint.
  2. In a large bowl, mix cabbage, mint, and golden raisins.
  3. Add enough mayonnaise to coat. Enjoy!

2016 CSA – Week 4: Cooking with Recipes

CSA Week 4 Graphic

CSA Newsletter – Week 4


Cooking with Recipes

I subscribe to cooking magazines and own several cookbooks and I love to read the recipes! However, when it comes to actually cooking, I almost never follow the recipe exactly. If I’m missing an ingredient, I’ll make a substitution or omit it all together. Or if there is something that I have in my fridge that I think would be a good addition to the dish, I’ll throw it in. To me, recipes are more of inspiration or reference rather than a formula. While this can be a risky approach when baking where ratios and ingredients can be critical, there is often a lot of room in for flexibility in recipes in cooking.

As a CSA member, your challenge each week is to utilize the contents of your box to make room for next week. There will be times when recipes you come across, even in the newsletter, call for ingredients that aren’t in your box. I encourage you to be flexible and adaptable. What recipe substitutions can you make to use your ingredients? Are there ingredients in your box that would be a great addition to a recipe that you found?

In the age of the internet, there are so many great digital resources for recipes and food preparation ideas. I have covered a few of my personal favorites in the recipe section.

Happy 4th of July and have a great week!

 

Table of Box Contents

Lettuce ($2.00)

1½ lbs Potatoes ($2.25) Store in dry, cool, darkness. Don’t scrub until you’re ready to eat them.

Napa Cabbage ($3.00)

great for stir fry, salad rolls, or coleslaw. See recipe!

Baby Red Onions ($2.50)

Chioggia Bunch Beets ($3.50) Remove greens and sauté or steam. Roast or steam beets. Great with balsamic vinegar and goat chèvre.

Cilantro ($2.00)

Jalapeno pepper ($0.50)

Broccoli ($1.75) Great fresh, sautéed, and in stir-fry

Fennel ($2.00) Use the bulb and fronds too. See recipe

3 cucumbers ($3.00) Eat fresh or add to salads

2-4 zucchini ($3.25) try zucchini pancakes! See recipe.

3 Tomatoes ($4.50)

Box Market Value: $30.25

 

Digital Resources All about Food and Cooking

 Food 52

A site that started with a simple mission: talk about food! This site is a forum for what to cook, how to cook, and recipes too!

NewYorkTimes Cooking

Find cooking techniques, searchable recipes, and gorgeous pictures!

Bon Appétit

A food magazine that follows trends, chefs, and what’s in season. Visit Bon Appétit for trending food news and recipes!

Epicurious

Search their large database of recipes by ingredient or dish. And peruse their articles for ingredient tips and expert advice.

 

Recipes:

Thai Coleslaw with Mint and Cilantro

This fresh take on coleslaw comes to your from Christopher Kimball at Milk Street Kitchen. I made this last week and it was light and delicious. Make a large batch and eat it all week!

Coconut milk offers the right balance of richness and fresh flavor for this Napa cabbage-based coleslaw. Many vegetables worked well, but the combination of sweet sugar snap peas and crispy radishes tested best.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (add more to taste)
  • 1 medium serrano chili, seeded and minced
  • 5 tablespoons coconut milk (not light coconut milk)
  • 1 pound Napa cabbage (1 small head), thinly sliced crosswise (about 8 cups)
  • 6 radishes, trimmed, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces sugar snap peas, strings removed and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh mint
  • ½ cup roasted, salted cashews, coarsely chopped

Instructions

  1. In a liquid measuring cup, combine the lime juice, sugar, fish sauce and chili. Let sit for 10 minutes. Whisk in the coconut milk until combined.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, radishes, peas, cilantro and mint. Add the dressing and toss until evenly coated. Stir in the cashews and serve.

Read More: Milk Street Kitchen

 

Fennel Slaw with Mint Vinaigrette

The sugar helps bring out the natural sweetness of the fennel, don’t leave out!

Ingredients

  • 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 medium bulbs)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar (or honey)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 2 teaspoons minced shallot or onion

Make the vinaigrette: Put the lemon juice, shallot, mustard, salt, sugar and mint in a blender (or use whisk) and pulse briefly to combine. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil until it is well combined.

Shave the fennel into thin slices: Very thinly slice the fennel into 1/8 inch slices starting from the bottom of the bulb (use a mandolin if you have one). Chop some of the fennel fronds as well to toss in with the salad.

Marinate fennel with vinaigrette: Toss with the fennel and marinate for at least an hour. Serve this salad either cold or at room temperature.

Read More: Simplyrecipes.com

 

Zucchini Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups grated zucchini
  • 1/2 cup grated potato
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

 Instructions

  1. Grate zucchini and potato. Let drain in colander for at least 30 minutes. Salt generously.
  2. In a bowl, beat egg, chopped parsley, and lemon zest. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Roll and squeeze zucchini/potato mixture in a towel to soak up moisture.
  4. Combine zucchini / potato mixture with egg mixture. Mix well.
  5. Heat skillet on medium high heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter or olive oil. Drop a spoonful of mixture in pan. Pat with spatula to flatten as much as possible — it’ll be crispier that way.
  6. Cook 2 at a time until golden brown on each side. Serve as soon as possible, with a dollop of sour cream or yogurt on top.

Read More: Food52